Home
Videos uploaded by user “Love Your Clothes”
Quick fixes: How to open sewn pockets
 
01:29
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-open-sewn-pockets YOU WILL NEED - An unpicker or nail scissors METHOD At the edge of the pocket opening you’ll see that the tacking stitch holding the pocket closed is loose and stretches open slightly when you lightly try pulling the pocket open. Starting at either side of the pocket take your unpicker and pull at the stitches which will easily come unstitched. Once you have more of an opening you may be able to cut the rest of the threads quickly with the unpicker or a small pair of scissors. Be careful not to slip with the unpicker and make a hole in the garment, it’s worth taking your time and being careful, it’s still a very quick task! Pull out any loose threads.
Views: 10572 Love Your Clothes
Creative crafts: make a memory quilt from babygrows
 
13:47
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/creative-crafts-making-memory-quilt-babygrows YOU WILL NEED - A selection of baby grows, or other types of baby clothing – you can get about four squares from each baby grow, so you’ll need 14 baby grows in total - Matching thread - Iron-on fusible interfacing - A 95cm x 110cm piece of wadding - A 130cm x 110cm piece of backing fabric - Self-healing mat, rotary cutter and quilting ruler - optional - Paper for template - Scissors - Pins - Hand-sewing needle - Tape measure - Tailor’s chalk - Fabric spray adhesive – it’s important to get the right type of adhesive! - Sewing machine - A walking foot and a ¼ inch (0.6mm) foot - optional - Iron and ironing blanket METHOD Cut out 56 15.5 x 15.5cm squares of interfacing – these are slightly larger than you’ll cut the patchwork squares. Cut the baby grows up one side seam, around the sleeve and then across the shoulder seam so they lie flat for ironing. Iron the interfacing squares onto the back of the baby grow fabric. Take care to place the squares so the pattern of the fabric is how you want it. Using a rotary cutter, ruler and matt, cut out 56 14x14cm squares from the baby grow fabric. Alternatively, you can make a 14x14cm square paper template, pin this onto the fabric and cut out with scissors. You’ll need to be as accurate as possible. Lay out all of your squares in a 7 by 8 grid and rearrange until you are happy with the design. Taking one row at a time, sew the squares right sides together using a 0.6mm (¼inch) seam allowance. Use the ¼ inch foot to do this – if you have one. If not, use the stitching guide on your sewing machine. Press the seams flat. Sew the rows right sides together, making sure the seams match, using a 0.6mm (¼ inch) seam allowance. Press the seams flat. Cut a section of wadding measuring 5cm larger than the quilt front all the way round. Cut a section of backing fabric 10cm bigger than the quilt front all the way round – this is also used to bind the quilt. Starting from the middle of the quilt, pin the patchwork, wadding and backing fabric together. Alternatively, you can use a fabric spray adhesive to stick them. Sew all the layers together using a walking foot – if you have one. Sew on directly on top of the seam lines between the squares – this will form a grid on the backing fabric. Then sew around the perimeter of the patchwork to complete the ‘squares’ on the outside edge. Mark, then trim, the wadding so that it is 3cm bigger than the quilt front all round. Mark, then trim, the backing fabric so that it is 7.5cm bigger than the quilt front all round. Turn the seam allowance of the backing fabric over and press. Fold the backing fabric over the wadding so it slightly overlaps the patchwork. Tuck the fabric in on each corner to create a mitre. Hand-sew the backing fabric to the front of the quilt using a ladder stitch.
Views: 11405 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to repair ripped pockets
 
02:37
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-repair-ripped-pockets YOU WILL NEED - A needle and thread of any colour - A pin - Scissors METHOD Turn your garment inside out and trim any frayed fabric off the pocket bag. Hold the top and bottom piece of pocket fabric together and roll it over by half a centimetre and then again to create a secure rolled hem. Pin this rolled hem in place. Sew with double thread along the rolled hem to secure the layers together. Sew one stitch forward and one back so that it is very strong. Finish it off securely and turn your garment back through.
Views: 13795 Love Your Clothes
Family Crafts: How to make a Halloween ghost costume from an old bedsheet
 
05:06
Unleash your spooky skills with this crafty costume from Love Your Clothes. For more information and the step-by-step instructions for this costume, visit www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/refashion-upcycle Disclaimer: We recommend that you avoid using highly flammable materials and if the product is intended for use by a child that particular care is taken with small parts. The products shown in our guides are not intended for use by under 3’s. If children are involved in the making process, adult supervision is recommended at all times. You will need: - Old light coloured double bed sheet (elasticated fitted sheet works best) - Dark coloured fabric (e.g. an old shirt or pillow case) - Fusible webbing suitable for applique - A length of string and a pen - Sewing kit - Sewing machine (if available) - Iron and ironing board Fold the sheet into quarters and lay it flat on a clean floor or large table. Tie a piece of string (that measures slightly longer than the quarter edge of the sheet) to the pen. Hold the string in the folded corner of the sheet (the centre point) and mark the widest arc you can with the pen. Cut the sheet along the marked line through all 4 layers. This will make ¼ of a circle (it will be a full circle when unfolded). Measure the head circumference of the person wearing the costume and add 5cms on to this measurement. Divide this measurement by 4 (to give ¼ head circumference + allowance for ease) and make note of this measurement for step 6. To make the neck hole for the costume, measure the length of the ¼ head circumference along the fold from the remaining corner (the centre point) and mark another arc. Cut the sheet along the marked line through all 4 layers. FOR THE HOOD Use the excess piece of fabric that you cut off when you were making the circle, matching seamed edge, place 2 pieces of fabric together. To get the correct size, take the full head circumference measurement (including the 5cm allowed for ease), halve this measurement then add on 1cm. Measure a square of this size from the seamed edge and cut the square out. Placing the seamed edge at the bottom, cut a curve from the bottom left side of the seamed edge to the opposite corner, to shape the back of the hood. Match the two halves of the hood right sides together and pin, so that when the hood is sewn and turned all of the seams will be on the inside. Sew the hood together along the curved edge (corner to corner), removing the pins as you go. Use a 1cm seam allowance and a straight stitch (or a back stitch if you are sewing by hand). See our skills sheet for instructions on how to do back stitch. INSERTING THE HOOD INTO THE MAIN BODY OF COSTUME On the neck hole of the costume mark the centre back, centre front and two sides using pins. By dividing the neck hole into quarters you can distribute the hood evenly, easing where necessary. Note: To make it easier, you can also divide the hood edge into quarters working from the centre back. Match the hood to the costume (placing right sides together), and pin the hood in place. Use the divided quarters of the neck hole and hood edge to do this evenly, easing where necessary (the hood will be on the outside of the costume while you are doing this). Using a 1cm seam allowance, stitch the hood in place, removing the pins as you sew. FOR THE DECORATION Sketch a suitable design such as a spooky face, or write something suitable for Hallowe’en on a piece of paper. Note: You can draw your design on an A4 sheet of paper but you will need to size it correctly for the costume in the following step. Using a hot iron carefully fuse the webbing to the wrong side of a suitably sized piece of dark fabric. Make sure you iron on the paper side and not the sticky side. Note: You can protect the fabric with a pressing cloth or tea towel if your fabric isn’t 100% cotton. It is worth doing a small test piece first as some fabrics can burn or melt when they are ironed at high temperatures. With a pencil, sketch your design on to the fusible webbing paper, ensuring the design is the right size for your costume. You will also need to ensure you draw any letters in reverse. Cut out each part of your design and then remove the paper layer from the webbing. Position the design pieces on the costume (sticky side down) and carefully press in place with a hot iron, using a pressing cloth or tea towel if necessary. Stitch each shape or letter down carefully using matching coloured threads on your sewing machine (or by hand, using a back stitch). See our skills sheet for instructions on how to do back stitch and on how to use fusible web. Finally, you can snip along the bottom edge of the costume to make a ragged edge.
Views: 16432 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to add elbow patches
 
05:21
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-add-elbow-patches YOU WILL NEED - A pair of patches - Pins - A medium heat iron - Needle and matching thread METHOD Place your patches onto your garment making sure they are level with each other, if you hold the under arms together and match up the seams on the sleeves you should be able to match the patches correctly. Pin your patches in place and try on the garment, you want to make sure that the hole/s are covered but also that the patches sit on your elbows when you have the garment on. Place a scrap piece of paper inside the sleeve, this is to stop the adhesive patch from sticking to the other side of your sleeve through the hole. Place your iron on the patch without moving and without using steam, ensure it has stuck down and if not repeat the ironing process. Sew a small neat running stitch around the patch close to the edge in a matching thread making sure you get your non-needle hand inside the sleeve so that you don’t accidentally sew the sleeve closed! Finish securely and give a final press. Repeat on the other sleeve.
Views: 3222 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to fix bra underwires
 
02:15
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-fix-bra-underwires YOU WILL NEED - Strapping (the sticky roll of fabric tape from a first aid kit) METHOD Push the wire back into the garment so it no longer protrudes from the hole. Cut a piece of strapping that is twice as wide as the hole. Pull the hole closed and cover it with your strapping patch, pressing down well. This will hold it and withstand washing, it is not an invisible repair but is on the inside of the bra.
Views: 304057 Love Your Clothes
Stain Removal: how to get sun cream off your clothes
 
02:54
Try these stain hacks to remove those tricky sunscreen marks! For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-how-get-sun-cream-your-clothes Sun’s out, sun cream’s out! There’s nothing better than a rare British summer’s day, but sun cream stains can be tricky to remove. Watch our video guide for step-by-step instructions on how to get rid of sunscreen stains so you can get back outside and enjoy some rays! We hope that you find the tips and suggestions in these videos helpful and fun to follow. Please note that no guarantees are given that any particular results will be achieved and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist. YOU WILL NEED - ,Kitchen towel, or clean dry cloth - Washing up liquid - White vinegar REMOVE Firstly, try blotting the sun cream stain with kitchen towel, to remove as much of the cream or oil as possible. Don’t rub it as you may drive the stain in deeper. TREAT Apply neat washing up liquid and rub into the stain to remove as much of the oil as possible, and then rinse in cold water. Next, soak the item in a solution of approximately half white vinegar and half cold water for about an hour. WASH Now, wash and dry the item as normal, and if possible leave to dry in the sun, as it has a natural bleaching quality. The sun cream stain should now be gone! If there are any marks still showing, try repeating the procedure.
Views: 16090 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to create a core wardrobe: men
 
03:11
Save money with our video guide that shows how to create a great core wardrobe for men. There are men’s fashion tips on how to choose versatile clothes, dress to suit your body and invest in pieces that’ll last for years. Never be short of something to wear ever again. Fashion advice to help you invest in less but wear more! Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-create-core-wardrobe-men For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes This guide will help you to define your wardrobe into a selection of wearable, interchangeable items for all occasions – saving you time and money. INVEST IN LESS A core wardrobe is a collection of essential items that you can mix and match to form a wide variety of outfits to suit any occasion. Owning a simple, clutter-free capsule wardrobe allows you to invest in great clothes that suit you and your lifestyle down to the ground CORE PIECES Jeans – classic blue jeans are always in fashion, and black jeans are great for a more formal occasion. Corduroy offers an alternative to denim, and in a neutral like tan can be teamed with muted tones like grey. Plain scarves can be teamed with sweaters for a smart casual look. Shirts – button down shirts can go with jeans or corduroys for a more formal occasion. White T-shirts should be considered a staple piece in any man’s wardrobe, much like the classic white shirt. Jackets – to help keep warm, a sports jacket is great for casual events. Padded or quilted versions are ideal for cooler weather and, as always, black, tan, brown or navy – neutral colours – will go with anything. If you want to inject some color, consider coloured scarves and belts. Shoes – consider a classic moccasin or Derby shoe, in black or brown. For relaxed occasions, a pair of trainers can add colour and provide comfort and are an essential item. Suit – this should be considered one of the most important items in a man’s wardrobe. A well-fitting suit is ideal for the workplace or formal social functions, especially in the basic choices of grey, navy or black. With these items, you should find you have a simple, de-cluttered wardrobe that suits your lifestyle and can see you through all occasions and from season to season.
Views: 2199 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: advice on refreshing clothes without washing them
 
03:55
Love Your Clothes and Jade Whitson-Smith show you how to refresh your clothes without washing them. There’s a number of different techniques that you can do that will require things like freezer bags, as well as cheap vodka and a spray bottle. It’s great to refresh clothes without washing them because sometimes your clothes might not be dirty, but might smell a bit dusty, so it’s great to have them smelling clean without washing them again. If you have a garment you want to refresh, hang it up in a steamy bathroom while you have a shower – this will help knock out creases and get it smelling fresh. You can also hang garments outside on a nice day if you have access to outside space to get rid of any smells. The second technique you can use is freezing your clothes. Freezing your clothes kills any bacteria in the clothes because of the low temperatures. We recommend using big freezer bags rather than plastic bags as normal bags can split and fall apart in the freezer. Add your garments to the bag, pop them in the freezer and leave them in there overnight. The third way you can refresh your clothes is to use vodka. It’s a great way to refresh your clothes in a much cheaper and nicer way by creating a clothing refresher spray instead of buying a shop bought one that has a chemically smell to it. Add your vodka to a spray bottle and spray any clothes you want to refresh. The Sprayed vodka again kills the bacteria on the clothes and refreshes them. You can also add a fragrance to your spray, by adding a few drops of essential oil to your vodka in the spray bottle and mix up. Give the garment a good spray from a distance and hang it to dry. Once dried it will smell nice and fresh without you having to rewash your clothing.
Views: 3635 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to declutter your wardrobe with a wardrobe audit
 
03:11
Struggling for space in your wardrobe? Follow our special de-cluttering guide to make the most of your clothes, clear out what you don’t need, and discover the secrets to identifying the key pieces that you should invest in. Never again will you have ‘nothing to wear’! Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-de-clutter-your-clothing-using-wardrobe-audit For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes Undertaking a wardrobe audit will help you to rediscover clothes you’ve forgotten about, recycle clothes you no longer want, and free up space for the key pieces that you need. ASSESS Go through every item in your wardrobe for your clearout. If it’s been languishing in the wardrobe for a while, it might be time to de-clutter and stop hoarding. Don’t be tempted to keep clothes just because they look good on the hanger but they don’t fit you or suit your body shape; these items will just take up space in your wardrobe. Consider whether you can alter any items to extend their use. If you love something and it needs repairing look for advice on the Love Your Clothes website. This could be something as simple as making minor repairs like replacing a missing button, or a more adventurous project like upcycling an old skirt into a shopping bag. DEJUNK Create separate piles of unwanted clothes: one pile to go to charity, one to give away to friends, one to sell, one for altering and one for laundering. If there are items that are worn beyond repair, donate them to a local textiles bank. We have a recycling locator that will help you find your nearest textiles recycling point. Rather than going to landfill the fabric can then be reused and turned into something useful: never throw clothes in the bin. RENEW Once you have your new edited wardrobe you might be able to identify key items which are missing in your core wardrobe. If this is the case, write a shopping list, and stick to it. Consider buying pre-loved clothes at charity shops or swishing parties. Choice is growing all the time and you can pick up unique vintage items often at a bargain price. You will then have a de-cluttered wardrobe, full of items you love that you can mix and match to suit all occasions. You don’t need lots of clothes in your wardrobe, just the right ones!
Views: 2182 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to organise a successful swishing clothes swap event
 
04:20
Whether you’re starting small at home or hosting a larger event at a public venue, our clothes swapping event guide will talk you through the basics you need to start swishing. Find out about different swapping systems, what people should bring, and practical information about setting up the venue. Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-organise-successful-swishing-clothes-swap-event For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes Exchange good quality clothes in a fun, relaxed atmosphere – whether it’s a big or small event. CHOOSE A VENUE Find a venue to suit the expected turnout for your clothes swap (swishing) event. This could be a table in the office at lunchtime to swap amongst colleagues, your front room with a group of friends, or your local village hall/community centre if you want to invite even more people. PROMOTE AND MAKE IT FUN Promote it via friends, colleagues and family – don’t underestimate the power of local word of mouth – you really want as many people as possible! Emphasise the fun, social aspect, and offer incentives to share details of the community event on social media. Don’t worry about starting small with a group of friends as these swaps can be great fun. However, the more participants you have the greater the choice of clothes will be! Why not ask everyone to bring two of their friends along? LET PEOPLE KNOW WHAT TO BRING Ask people to bring clean, dry, good quality clothing and make it explicit if there’s a minimum number of items they must bring, as well as if there’s an entry fee. You may want to specify that they should bring items on hangers to put up around the room or on a rail. Let people know if you’re happy to swap other items such as pieces of fabric, shoes, bags, vintage homewares etc too, and perhaps set this up in a different area of the room. HOW TO SWAP Encourage a spirit of goodwill, and remind people that they should only bring good quality second-hand clothes that they don’t mind giving away to a new loving home, and not to have an equivalent value in mind when swapping. On the day it can help to play some upbeat background music and you may like to provide some food or drinks (away from the clothes). Larger swaps sometimes incorporate a raffle so that attendees get a raffle ticket for every item brought to the swap. A clear swapping system can be important, especially for larger swaps, or those with an entry fee – although for small swaps with friends a free-for-all can be great fun! It’s up to you what system you use but here are a few popular options: • Tokens can be handed out according to the number of garments accepted into the swapping pool. Each token is then exchanged for an item in the swap. This is a good way of making sure that only high quality items are accepted into the pool of clothing, and people don’t leave with significantly more than they came with. • Coloured tokens based on value: coloured tokens (e.g. pieces of coloured card) can be used to distinguish between items of higher value, or higher weight. This would mean that people can swap a light top for a similar item, but not for a heavy coat – which would require a higher value of token. Tokens can be awarded different numbers of ‘points’ if you want them to be interchangeable. • For larger events, it might be useful to have someone on the door who checks the quality of items people have brought and decides the value before handing out the correct level of token. If this will be the case it can help to let people know in advance so they aren’t surprised to have their clothes checked over and awarded a value of token. • Swaps with an entry fee often set item limits (e.g. £4 entry fee gets you 4 items) – if people want to take more items home you can offer the opportunity to pay another entry fee and take home more items of clothing. Layout is important. You may want to set it up like a boutique (with items hanging up, on rails if possible) or have a pile to rummage through or both – think about what will work best depending on how many people are coming and the volume of clothes expected. It helps to have a good starting stock built up beforehand, for example, clothes that are left behind from previous swaps or stuff you’ve gathered from friends and family, this means there’s less chance of someone going home disappointed or empty-handed. It’s always handy to have a full-length mirror available, and a separate room to try items on, or a makeshift changing room. This will cut down on people taking home things they don’t actually want, which devalues the clothes swap and potentially refills their wardrobe with things they won’t wear!
Views: 560 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to create a core wardrobe: women
 
03:16
Learn how to create your own core wardrobe, with the classic key pieces that can be styled to suit any occasion. From dressing for daytime to accessorising for a night out, this guide will show you all the tips you need to ensure you’ll always look smart and feel great. Be stylish every day, without breaking the bank! Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/build-your-core-wardrobe For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes
Views: 1023 Love Your Clothes
Stain Removal: How to get curry off your clothes
 
03:51
Eaten your curry in a hurry and now you’ve got a souvenir of the meal? Follow our top tips to help get that tell-tale curry stain out of your clothes, all in one handy video. With only everyday items from the kitchen cupboard, our easy stain hacks can save the day. Remove that curry in a hurry! We hope that you find the tips and suggestions in these videos helpful and fun to follow. Adult supervision is recommended at all times when following our guides. Please note that no guarantees are given that any particular results will be achieved and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist. Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-how-get-curry-your-clothes For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/care-repair
Views: 8861 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to get biro out of clothes
 
02:25
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-biro You will need - Paper towel, ie kitchen towel - Rubbing alcohol or hand sanitiser - Hairspray - Water METHOD Treat the stain as soon as possible. Lay the garment on top of a paper towel with the stain facing down. Soak another paper towel in rubbing alcohol or hand sanitiser and dab it onto the back of the stain. Rinse the garment in cold water. Spray hairspray directly onto the stain. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label.
Views: 9955 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove sweat stains from clothes
 
03:11
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-sweat You will need - Baby powder - Iron and ironing board - Table salt or white vinegar - Warm water Note: It is always best to prevent a stain than remove it. • To prevent sweat stains on white shirts, use a stain guard by sprinkling a little baby powder onto the underarms and collar, then iron. • The powder forms a barrier that keeps grease and grime from seeping into the garment. METHOD Make a solution of two pints of warm water with four tablespoons of table salt. Soak the garment in this solution overnight. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label. FOR STUBBORN STAINS Stretch the shirt over a bowl, keeping the stained area exposed in the middle of the bowl. Pour white household vinegar through the stained area three times. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label. You can also try sponging hot vinegar onto the stain and let it soak for a few hours before washing.
Views: 3349 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: How to wash and dry silk garments
 
03:49
Love Your Clothes and Jenniffer Taylor give you advice on how to wash silk and drying silk garments. Always check the label of your garment to make sure your clothes aren’t dry clean only. Second tip, we recommend drying your hair or putting on any perfume before you put on your silk clothes as either could damage the fibers in your clothes. The best way to wash silk is by hand as washing machines can damage silk. Use an appropriate delicate detergent in a bowl of water around 30 degrees. When washing silk you want to agitate it in the water but do not ring the silk as it can damage the fibers. Adding a drop of distilled vinegar can bring your silk back to life when rinsing it. Gently bunch your silk to get out excess water – if you bunch it up you will damage it. Next get a cold clean towel and place your silk on the towel and wrap it in the towel. Then you can give it a bit more of a squeeze in the towel to get as much as the water out as possible. You should only use plastic coat hangers for silk garments as others can damage. You then want to hang your silk in the bathroom or somewhere similar as it gets rid of wrinkles without having to iron and potentially damage your silk clothing.
Views: 985 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: how to brighten your whites
 
01:56
Love Your Clothes and Jenniffer Taylor gives you some great and simple tips for whitening your clothes – and also how to brighten your clothes. We look at easy and effective ways to do this by using bicarbonate of soda. Just using half a cup will allow you to cheaply brighten your whites and brighten all of your other clothes as well, such as shirts with areas of white. The natural oils of your skin will naturally make the underarms of your clothes yellow. The best way to fix this is to get a small amount of water and a couple of teaspoons of bicarbonate of soda and mix to a paste – this technique is perfect for adding to underneath the arms as a pre-treatment. Throw it in the wash as normal and then dry outside on a line to kill all bacteria and get your whites looking white again. Disclaimer: The guides contained on this site are a collection of home remedies and personal recommendations which have not been scientifically tested. No guarantees are given that following them will achieve the intended results and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. You must make your own assessment about the guides and if you choose to follow them it is at your own risk. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist.
Views: 3910 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to repair a fallen hem
 
02:36
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-repair-fallen-hem YOU WILL NEED - Hemming tape - Medium heat iron - A damp cloth METHOD Lay the garment layer to be hemmed on your ironing board, inside up. Arrange the hem so that the width matches the rest of the garment hem. Cut a piece of hemming tape the length of the fallen section of hem. Place the hemming tape inside the hem, between the folded section and the body of the garment, making sure it is straight and flat to the garment. Hemming tape is adhesive on both sides so once you are happy with the positioning you can place your iron on the garment, do not move it around just hold it down for around 30 seconds. If you are using this technique on fabric that is fine or delicate it’s a good idea to dampen a clean tea towel and place this on top of the garment before ironing. This will withstand washing but for a more secure finish take a matching, single thread and make some invisible, loose stitches on the inside of the garment.
Views: 4873 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: how to prevent moth damage naturally
 
02:54
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/fabric-focus-preventing-moth-damage YOU WILL NEED - Lavender bags / lavender oil - Cedar wood balls or hang tags PLEASE NOTE We can’t guarantee the following tips will stop moths, but they should help to avoid them and prevent damage to your clothes. If you already have clothes moths, you might need to contact a professional to help remove them altogether. METHOD Moths love dust, so one of the best ways to prevent them in the first place is to have a clean, well-organised wardrobe. Make sure you regularly sort through your clothes and remove dust from your wardrobes and drawers. Moths tend to do the most damage when clothes are being stored and an infestation goes unnoticed - when wool jumpers are put away over the summer, for instance. So, wash all garments before storing them in vacuum bags. Lavender acts as a deterrent to moths - it won’t kill them, but they don’t like it. Lavender bags can be hung in your wardrobe with your garments, and a few drops of lavender essential oil can be added to the final rinse of hand-washed garments. Cedar wood contains an oil that can kill small moth larvae. Cedar wood balls and hang tags can be put in drawers and wardrobes. They do lose their effectiveness after a few years, so they’ll need to be topped up with cedar wood essential oil. IF YOU FIND MOTH DAMAGE ON YOUR CLOTHES Wash the moth-damaged garments to remove all eggs and larvae. Any other garments in your wardrobe can be put in the freezer, in a plastic freezer bag, for a few days to kill off any potential infestation. Thoroughly clean all wardrobes, drawers and anywhere else where your clothes are stored. Mend the holes in any moth-damaged garments. We have a step-by-step guide here: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/tip/mending-a-hole-or-tear/
Views: 2558 Love Your Clothes
Fabric care: How to wash and dry woollen garments
 
03:43
Love Your Clothes and Jade Whitson-Smith show you how to wash and dry woollen garments. The great thing about woollen garments is that they don’t need to be washed very often. Washing your wool too often can actually damage the fibers and prematurely age your knitted garments. If you really want to look after your wool it needs handwashed. Unlike the rest of your laundry, wool needs a really gentle detergent – you can buy wool detergents and follow the instructions on the packet. Most of them just require one cap of detergent poured into your sink with warm water. Make sure the water isn’t hot or that could damage your clothes. Make sure it is mixed well and then gently add your garment to the mixture and try to rinse some of that detergent out, repeating until no soap comes out into the water. Once complete you will want to take your wool out – you don’t want to ever ring wool garments as that will damage the fibres. You just want to gently squeeze your wool of any excess water. In order to dry it you want to lay out a towel, squeeze the excess water out of your garment and place on the towel. Then roll the towel up, with the garment inside, like a swill roll and gently press to get any excess water out. Once complete, you can just lay the garment flat onto the towel to dry. You don’t want to put your drying wool near heat as that can damage your clothing. Once the wool is dry and you want to press it, get your ironing board out and use a steam iron. You don’t ever want to press down on a wool garment, you want to hover the iron over the garment while pressing steam at it. If you don’t have a steam iron, put a tea towel on top of your wool and use a normal iron on top to steam your wool flat.
Views: 1104 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to get the best value when selling your clothes online
 
03:43
Make money with this super smart guide to getting the most for your old clothes. Our tips include where to sell, how to take accurate measurements, what you should include in your description, and what makes a good photograph. Sort your wardrobe with these great selling tips! We hope that you find the tips and suggestions in these videos helpful and fun to follow. Please note that no guarantees are given that any particular results will be achieved when following our videos. We recommend that you take care using social media, particularly when sharing personal details or arranging face to face meetings or events. Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-get-best-value-when-selling-your-clothes-online For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes A few simple tips will help to boost the selling power of your preloved and second-hand clothes. SHOW ITEM AT ITS BEST There are a variety of sites and apps that can help you to sell second-hand clothes you no longer want, such as eBay, Facebook Marketplace, Preloved, Gumtree, Depop and many more. When you’re choosing where to post your items for sale, you could consider these selling tips: • Is there an app, or is the website easy to use on a mobile phone? • Can you leave buyer feedback? • What is the target audience for the platform, does it suit the type of item you want to sell? A good photo can make all the difference when you sell online, so you need to prepare the item before snapping it to increase its value. Creased clothes will be vastly improved after a good iron, and if there’s any damage consider making small repairs, like hand hemming or replacing buttons. TAKE A GOOD PHOTO To get the best image: • Hang the item on a plain background, i.e. the back of a door • Include an image of the item being worn, if you can (usually best to crop out heads) • Take pictures with daylight rather than artificial light (even if you upload in the evening) • If there is damage (even repaired damage), take a picture of it, don’t try to hide it. Usually, the damage isn’t as bad as people would imagine if they can’t see it. BE DESCRIPTIVE Think about what you look for when searching for clothes online: size, colour, style, brand, is it vintage, condition etc. If it has a defining feature or a brand name put it in the title – people search for brands they like or know fit. Invest in a measuring tape and list the actual dimensions of items, as people don’t always trust a ‘standard size’, particularly with vintage items. It can also help to describe the feel of the fabric, and if the item will suit a range of sizes or body shapes mention that too!
Views: 696 Love Your Clothes
Family Crafts: How to make a Hungry Caterpillar costume
 
07:40
Have fun making this lovely children's costume, using old fabric from your old fleeces and t-shirts! For more information and the step-by-step instructions for this costume, visit www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/refashion-upcycle Disclaimer: We recommend that you avoid using highly flammable materials and if the product is intended for use by a child that particular care is taken with small parts. The products shown in our guides are not intended for use by under 3’s. If children are involved in the making process, adult supervision is recommended at all times. Love Your Clothes show you to make a hungry caterpillar costume which is great for Halloween or children’s dress up parties. The things you need are: - An old green t shirt to fit your child - Old fleeces in greens, browns and reds (you can buy fleece by the meter if you don’t have any) - Length of plastic coated garden wire - Pattern pieces (included in instructions) - Sewing kit - Matching thread - Sewing machine FOR THE BODY Measure from the armpit for where you want your first stripe to start and add 1cm seam allowance. Mark this and then cut the t-shirt across. Use the bottom of the t-shirt to create a template for your stripes – don’t forget to add a 1cm seam allowance to the top and bottom, if you don’t have an old fleece to upcycle you can always look in your local charity shop. Using two pieces of coloured fleece material, pin the two fluffy sides in together and stitch using a 1cm seam allowance. Repeat so you have 4 panels for the front and 4 for the back. Note: you will need to create two separate panels of four stripes each. These will be the front and back of the costume. Using the leg template, create using a double layer of your fabric and cut out and then sew together and turn so the seams are on the inside and stuff. Repeat until you have the necessary number of legs (we made 8). Fold the T-shirt in half and measure the width of the bottom edge. Add 1cm for your seam allowance. Make a note of this. Fold the striped panels in half. Measure to your noted length. Pin and cut out. Use fabric scraps/offcuts etc to create a tassel for the back of the caterpillar. Place the back panel on a flat surface, right side up. Position the tassels in place and secure with pins. Stitch a line up the centre back. Note: you can cut into the tassels to make them thinner if you wish. Place the caterpillar back section on a flat surface, right side up and position the legs on it (facing inwards). Carefully lay the front panel on top, ensuring right sides are together and matching the seams. Pin through each seam and each leg, then sew the two sides together, making sure to catch all of the layers. With the caterpillar costume turned inside out, place the right side of the T-shirt to the right side of the costume part, matching side seams and back and front (the T-shirt will slot inside). Pin together, easing in where necessary. Stitch together. Turn the caterpillar right side out. TO MAKE THE CATERPILLAR HAT Pin the hat template to a double layer of red fleece. Carefully cut it out, including the darts. Unpin the template and separate the two hat pieces. Pin the darts closed (these are going to give the hat shape). Stitch the darts on the wrong side of the fabric on the two separate hat pieces. FOR THE EYES AND ANTENNAE Pin the eye template to a double layer of suitably coloured fabric (we used yellow). Cut two eyes and cut two inner eye pieces from a contrasting fabric (we used green). Pin the antenna template to a double layer of fabric (right sides together) – we used green fabric. Cut out. Repeat this step to make two separate antennae. Place the eye pieces in position on one side of your hat – make sure it is right side out. Pin each eye in place and stitch down along the outer edge of the inner eye. Place two antenna pieces right sides together, then stitch around, leaving the flat end open. Repeat for the second antenna. Trim any excess fabric away from the seams. Using a chopstick or pencil, turn each antenna right side out. Take a length of garden wire and feed it into each antenna to give shape. Trim any excess away with sturdy scissors (not your best sewing ones!). Sandwich the two antennae between the two hat layers: Place the front hat panel on a flat surface with the eye side facing up. Place the antenna on top of this – facing inwards. Lay the second hat panel on top, right side down (make sure the base of each antenna pokes out slightly). Pin the hat together and then stitch the seam. Tip: when you are ready to sew over the wire in the antennae, turn the sewing machine wheel by hand so that your needle goes over the wire and you don’t break the needle. Turn the hat the right way out.
Views: 6871 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove grease fat from clothes
 
02:41
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-grease-and-fat You will need - A spoon - Paper towel, ie kitchen towel - Baby powder or salt – cornflour or flour are also effective alternatives - A toothbrush - Washing-up liquid - Water METHOD 1 Treat the stain as soon as possible. 2 Scrape off as much of the grease or oil as possible with a spoon, being careful not to grind the grease in to the fabric. 3 Put baby powder or salt on the stain and leave for five to ten minutes. 4 Rub it in to the stain with a toothbrush and then tip off the excess. 5 Use a toothbrush to apply washing-up liquid and a little water directly onto the stain and onto the front and the back of the fabric. 6 Rinse, then wash the garment following instructions on the care label. 7 Air-dry the garment. DO NOT place in a tumble dryer until you are sure the stain is completely gone.
Views: 3824 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove red wine from your clothes
 
03:06
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-red-wine You will need - Cold running water - A clean cloth - Salt - Liquid laundry detergent - If the stain is really bad, you’ll also need a strain remover stick or gel METHOD Treat the stain as soon as possible. Hold the stained garment under cold running water – do this from the wrong side of the fabric through the back of the stain. Blot the stained area with a clean cloth. Sprinkle salt onto the stain and allow it to work for three to four minutes – the salt will absorb the remaining red wine from the stain. Rinse the stained area from the back of the fabric, rubbing it gently between your fingers. Pour liquid laundry detergent onto the stain and leave to soak into the stain for about three to five minutes. Rinse with cold water If there’s still a slight stain, you can use a stain remover stick or gel, then rinse the garment again. Make sure that the stain has completely gone before air drying the garment
Views: 2295 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to repair a ripped belt loop
 
04:38
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-replace-ripped-belt-loop YOU WILL NEED - Scissors - Needle and matchingthread - Heat bonded fabrictape - Medium heat iron - Pin - Unpicker METHOD Start by unpicking the last threads if your belt loop is still attached where it has torn – it should still be attached to the garment but only by the undamaged end. Remove loose threads from the inside and outside of the garment. Pin the loose belt loop back on itself so it won’t get in the way of the area you’re working on. Cut a piece of your heat bonded fabric tape that is twice as wide as the hole or tear. Place it inside the garment with the shiny side facing the fabric, put the garment on the ironing board with the right side up so that you can make sure the tear is properly closed before you iron, you don’t want any of the patch to show through and stick to your iron. Have a last check that your patch hasn’t moved and is still covering the inside of the hole. If you are working with a fine fabric, take a clean tea towel and dampen it and use it to cover the section you’ll iron, otherwise press down with your iron on medium heat without moving the iron around. Hold the iron down for 30 seconds, do not use any steam. Check the inside of the garment that the patch has stuck fast, if it peels away slightly then repeat the ironing process. When your patch is secure, unpin the belt loop and realigned it so that it covers the tear, pin this down so it doesn’t shift around as you’re sewing. Take your needle and matching thread and knot it double. Sew the belt loop back down, following the holes in the belt loop from the original stitching, finish securely.
Views: 2090 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to add school name labels
 
03:11
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-add-school-name-labels YOU WILL NEED - An adhesive name tape - A medium heat iron - Scissors - Needle and white thread METHOD Find the middle of the inner back of the garment using the buttons or zip on the front of the garment as a guide. Press the iron onto the label without moving it around, mind your fingers! For extra security you can sew a couple of stitches on either end of the label. The stitches should be small and neat and would ideally be invisible from the back of the garment, however the labels are designed to withstand washing without being sew on.
Views: 2148 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to replace a broken zip pull
 
02:13
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-replace-broken-zip-pull YOU WILL NEED - A paper clip Or Wool - A large needle - A pair of scissors METHOD A great way of keeping a jacket useable when the zip pull has broken off is to feed a paper clip through the hole left by the zip pull. A plastic coated one will be waterproof too. A solution which you can match to the garment is to thread a large needle with 10cm of wool that matches your garment. Cut off the needle leaving two matching strands, tie a knot in the doubled wool and continue to tie knots as though the first stage of tying your shoes until you have a string of knots, for the final knot tie a sideways knot using all four strands together. Trim off any excess wool.
Views: 1686 Love Your Clothes
Easy DIY spider costume
 
00:36
Creep about in this awesome spider costume - perfect for Halloween or World Book Day. Completely made up of your own clothes. No need to buy anything new or damage your wardrobe. You can find out more on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/ All you need to make the perfect DIY spider costume is: - Black Top - Black Jeans - 2 pairs of old tights stuffed with newspaper - Black backpack And you are ready to go!
Views: 5485 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove engine oil stains from clothes
 
01:46
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-engine-oil You will need - Colourless moisturising lip balm - A bottle of cola - Paper towel, ie kitchen towel METHOD Treat the stain as soon as possible. Put the oil stain face down on some paper towel, then rub the lip balm onto the back of the stain. This will make the oil stain lift. Put the garment into the washing machine, but instead of using washing detergent, pour a bottle of cola into the drum of the washing machine and run a 30 degree wash. The sugars and phosphoric acid will break down the grease stain.
Views: 30643 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: how to press a shirt using a sleeve board
 
03:00
Love Your Clothes gives you the best tips to revitalize an old shirt using a sheet board. We give you a number of little tips that will help to bring your shirt back to life and iron your shirt so it looks like new. The tips will give your shirt a crisp look so that it looks like the shirt has just been bought. Disclaimer: The guides contained on this site are a collection of home remedies and personal recommendations which have not been scientifically tested. No guarantees are given that following them will achieve the intended results and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. You must make your own assessment about the guides and if you choose to follow them it is at your own risk. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist.
Views: 3500 Love Your Clothes
Creative crafts: making a tablet sleeve from denim jeans
 
11:56
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/creative-crafts-making-tablet-sleeve-denim-jeans YOU WILL NEED - Old jeans or a denim skirt - Wadding - Lining - medium to lightweight cotton fabric - Matching thread - A button to fit through the buttonhole on waistband - Paper (to make a pattern) - Strong sewing machine needles which are suitable to sew denim - Hand-sewing needle - Pins - Scissors - Tape measure - Tailor’s chalk - Sewing machine - Iron and ironing board METHOD Measure the width and height of your tablet, adding on 4cm to each measurement for seam allowances. Make a paper pattern of the size – as a guide, ours measured 13.5cm wide x 20cm tall, so our pattern was cut to 17.5cm x 24cm. Using the pattern, you’ve just made, pin and then cut out: - Two pieces of denim - incorporating the pocket on the back of the jeans on one piece. Use the top line of the pocket as a reference point to ensure the denim piece is parallel with the pocket - Two pieces of wadding - Two pieces of lining fabric Using the jeans waistband - the side that has a button hole - cut out a closing tab. You’ll probably need to cut off a belt loop to be able do this. Our tab was 12cm long, but this will vary depending on where the pocket is located on your tablet case. Pin the wadding and the denim together to make a sandwich with the denim in the middle (right sides facing). Sew along the sides and the bottom of the case using a 1cm seam allowance. Place the lining pieces with right sides together. Sew the side seams only, using a 1cm seam allowance. Turn the lining right side out and place inside the denim, so that right sides are facing and seams match. Place the closing tab at the top centre between the lining and the denim/wadding – on the side that doesn’t have the pocket. Pin around the top, making sure the closing tab is on the inside. Sew together around the top edge, using a 1cm seam allowance. Ensure you flatten the seams out otherwise it will be too bulky to sew. Stitch over the tab area several times to strengthen. Diagonally trim the corners off the bottom of the denim/ wadding to reduce the bulk but please, whatever you do, don’t cut the stitching you’ve just done! Turn the case the right way out through the gap in the bottom of the lining. Push out the corners to get the correct shape, then press. Turn the bottom raw edges of the lining in to the wrong side by 1.5cm and press. Stitch close to the edge to secure. Push the lining inside the denim sleeve and then press the top edges. Using a straight stitch, top-stitch around the sides and bottom of the case close to the edge to create a protective ridge around the sides of the case. Turn the closing tab over to the pocket and mark where you need to sew the button on. Sew the button in place on the pocket only.
Views: 633 Love Your Clothes
Creative crafts: making a cushion cover from a jumper
 
05:20
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/creative-crafts-making-cushion-cover-jumper YOU WILL NEED - A jumper - A cushion pad – this needs to be roughly the same width as the jumper and the height should easily fit between the jumper armhole and hem (allowing some extra for a lap-over) - Ribbons - shoulder loop ribbons from tops or jumpers work really well - Five buttons that contrast with the jumper – we used 2.5cm diameter buttons - Two or three sew-on snap fasteners - Sewing thread in a colour to match the jumper - Some yarn or embroidery thread in a colour to match the jumper (for blanket stitching) - Tailor’s chalk (for marking cutting/sewing lines) - Scissors, pins and hand sewing needle - A ruler - A sewing machine (optional) METHOD Turn the jumper inside out. Lay the jumper flat on a table and draw a straight line horizontally across, just under the jumper’s armholes. Cut along this line. Keep the top section of the jumper for another project. Using the bottom section of the jumper, stitch a straight seam 1cm in from the cut edge. Machine stitching is strongest, but you can sew by hand using a back stitch if you prefer. To learn how to do back stitch, take a look at our sewing skills sheet. Turn the jumper the right way out. Insert the cushion pad, pushing it well into the corners. Fold the spare fabric from the front over to the back. Using tailor’s chalk or pins, mark the line where you want the buttons to go on the back of the jumper. Sew on the buttons, evenly spaced. We used five buttons to give the cushion a good line when closed at the back. Instructions on how to sew on a button can be found here: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/tip/how-to-sew-a-button/ Cut five lengths of ribbon - long enough to loop around the buttons plus some extra ribbon for stitching on to the jumper. Avoid making these loops too long as the buttons could slip out easily. If you can, allow enough ribbon to be able to loop around the button twice as this gives a tight loop around the button centre. Pin the ribbon loops between the two layers of jumper (on the hem edge), placing them in alignment with the buttons. Stitch the ribbon loops on by hand. The loop in the centre just needs to be stitched to the top layer of the jumper. Stitch a narrow straight seam across the open (hem) edge from each side seam, leaving a gap in the centre so you can get the cushion pad in or out! Note: Any ribbon loops within these sewn sections will get a further row of stitches to secure them. Fold the open end (with the ribbon loops) over to the back of the cushion. Using tailor’s chalk or pins, mark on each side of the cushion where the hem edge of the jumper goes to when it’s folded over. Take the cushion pad out. Pin the lap-over in place, using the marks you just made as a guide. Stitch the lap-over down on each side to hold it in place – it’s best to hand-stitch this using a blanket stitch. To learn how to do this, see our sewing skills sheet. Hand-sew a few press studs on to the open hem section. Insert cushion pad again, do the buttons up and you’re done. And if you fancy doing a little something extra, you can embellish as much as you like. Try adding more buttons or braids, for instance.
Views: 1810 Love Your Clothes
Stain Removal: how to remove baby stains from clothes
 
03:02
Babies can put even the toughest laundry detergent through its paces. Our video guide will help you to remove baby stains, including baby sick, baby food to baby poo! There are tips for both white and coloured clothes, including the best way to dry clothes to reduce stains. Feel that ‘baby love’ for your laundry again! We hope that you find the tips and suggestions in these videos helpful and fun to follow. Adult supervision is recommended at all times when following our guides. Please note that no guarantees are given that any particular results will be achieved and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist. Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-how-remove-baby-stains-clothes For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/care-repair
Views: 493 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove blood stains from clothes
 
02:13
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-blood You will need - Paper towel, ie kitchen towel, or a clean cloth - White vinegar METHOD 1 Treat the stain as soon as possible – blood stains are relatively easy to remove before they set, but can be nearly impossible to wash out after 24 hours. 2 If you get to the stain before it sets, pour white vinegar over it. 3 Let the vinegar soak in for five to ten minutes. 4 Blot well with a paper towel to work the vinegar into the fabric fibre. 5 Repeat if necessary. 6 Wash immediately, following instructions on the care label. Note: - If the blood stain has already set, soak it in vinegar for longer, then proceed with Steps 5 and 6 above
Views: 6276 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: general laundering tips and how to wash clothes
 
04:39
Love Your Clothes and Jade Whitson-Smith, a textiles lecturer shows you how to look after your clothes whilst you’re washing them. One great way to keep your clothes in their best condition is to reduce the times you actually wash them. Washing your clothes regularly can do more harm than good. If you have a brand new item of clothing and you spill something on it, you can actually spot clean it rather than add it to the wash. To spot clean you just need a soft, damp, cloth and maybe some detergent if it’s a bad stain. All you need to do is gently dap the spot and get rid of any excess detergent. Dry on a towel and it should be good to wear again, without having to go through a full cycle. When preparing to do a wash, you should separate light colours from dark colours. Any really new bright colours should be separated to stop it from ruining your older clothes. You should also look to separate by weight as well. Avoid putting heavy fabrics like pieces of denim with lighter fabrics as it could damage them. A good idea for more delicate fabrics is to use a delicate bag to protect the garments. You should also make sure that your zips on garments are always closed to avoid them catching on any other fabrics and make holes. Always remember to check the pockets for coins or tissues that could also damage garments. Eco-washing powders also allow you to wash at lower temperatures and protect your clothing. You should also think carefully about the wash cycle based on what types of clothing you're using and how dirty they are. After washing, try not to use tumble driers as they use a lot of energy and are harsh on your clothes. If you can hang outside this is best, but if not, clothes racks in ventilated areas are also good. If you are then going to iron, try to use a low heat setting to avoid damaging the garments and hang them up as soon as finished to make sure they are looking their best. Disclaimer: The guides contained on this site are a collection of home remedies and personal recommendations which have not been scientifically tested. No guarantees are given that following them will achieve the intended results and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. You must make your own assessment about the guides and if you choose to follow them it is at your own risk. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist.
Views: 1252 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to shorten a stretched strap
 
04:10
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-shorten-stretched-strap YOU WILL NEED A pin Measuring tape A needle and matching thread METHOD Try on your garment and pull the excess strap to the inside of the garment, when you’re happy that it’s adjusted to the correct length pin it securely to the front of the top. You actually want to sew it to the back so it’s less visible so measure the amount you’ve folded in with a tape measure, measure this on the back of the strap and pull it in to the back of the top, then pin in place. Grab your needle and matching thread, thread it double and knot the end. Start your stitch at the inside of the fold so the knot won’t be visible. Make two stitches at the top of the fold, go through each layer to the front of the garment and then all the way through to the inside of the garment. Pull it taut and then make two further stitches, fasten securely. Repeat on the other side.
Views: 6015 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to find great vintage clothing
 
02:04
Vintage clothing offers beautiful, affordable and original pieces to add instant glamour to your wardrobe. Our how-to guide gives top tips on where to shop vintage both online and on the high street, and how to find the best pieces. Your new favourite outfit doesn’t have to be ‘new’ – start shopping vintage today! Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-find-great-vintage-clothes For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes Stand out from the crowd with these handy hints on shopping for vintage clothes both online and on the high street. WHERE TO START There are lots of places to shop for vintage clothes: markets, online, apps like ‘Depop’, or charity and specialist vintage shops. Vintage shopping is a great way of finding special, unique one-off pieces. Look at the different textures, the variety of colours and the interesting fabrics, which will vary depending on each piece. If you opt for seasonless pieces you will get more wear out of it! For those who are not accustomed, it’s best to go at it with a clear idea of what you’re looking for, to avoid feeling overwhelmed or unsure. So, decide on an outfit you need and look for key pieces you can build around. If you’ve got a special occasion, like a party, coming up, a vintage piece will ensure you’ll stand out from the crowd and avoid that dreaded ‘same outfit’ scenario. Perfect if you’re a fan of a specific era, and want an original 1970s jumpsuit, not a high street replica. WHAT TO LOOK FOR It’s not just parties that vintage dressing is ideal if you’re a blushing bride-to-be vintage shopping opens a whole new world of exciting, unique dresses and outfits, that nobody else will be wearing. Vintage is perfect for items with a bit of drama, so check for detailing that sets the clothes apart, like brocade or beading. Don’t be afraid to mix your eras – if you add a pair of retro 90s high tops or sneakers to a cheeky little 60s dress you’re going to look much less like you stepped out of your nan’s closet and more like an accomplished style maven. ASK FOR HELP Most people who sell vintage clothing have a real passion for it and will be more than willing to help. If you’re unsure about sizing or want to know more about a designer, just ask, and always try something on where possible! This goes for if you’re looking for a specific item too, most vintage sellers will have an idea where certain items can be found, even if they don’t have it in stock, or could source it for you. When adding a key new piece to your wardrobe, shop for the clothes you already have and choose quality pieces that will evolve your capsule looks. Be more creative with the styling of what’s in your existing wardrobe. It’s really rewarding and considering what you’ve already got will help you to shop smarter. Remember the sizing will probably have changed through the years so don’t restrict yourself to only looking at items in ‘your size’ – and always try things on! UNIQUE TO YOU Choose things you really love. Don’t worry about the designer name, or if it’s a brand you’ve never heard of, or about the value of the piece, it’s about finding something to treasure that makes you feel good and you’ll get lots of wear out of. So, try to have fun when you’re vintage shopping, and if something catches your eye try it on, as it might be your dream outfit.
Views: 827 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to create a capsule wardrobe and store your clothes between seasons
 
05:22
Follow our guide to cultivating your own core wardrobe to suit all seasons, with tips on how to help clothes last longer with great storage ideas. There are even some suggestions of the essential basics no wardrobe should be without, with tips on decluttering and how to store your summer and winter clothes. Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-create-capsule-wardrobe-and-store-your-clothes-between-seasons For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes DEFINE YOUR CAPSULE WARDROBES A seasonal capsule wardrobe allows you to safely store and preserve your spring/summer or autumn/winter items, and bring them into your wardrobe only when they will be needed. This means that the items you see in your wardrobe are relevant and season specific, leaving you with a de-cluttered, edited wardrobe. Think about each of your seasonal wardrobe essentials. Spring/summer is for lighter weight items, such as linen dresses, sandals and vest tops, all in lovely bright colours and strong prints, perfect for a summer holiday. In autumn/winter, it’s heavier, bulkier items with lots of knitwear, heavy coats and warmer trousers. Good storage of both seasonal wardrobes will prevent damage so you can wear pieces year after year. CHECK YOUR GARMENTS Before storage, check for damage or repairs such as loose buttons or ripped belt loops that you can repair using the guides on the Love Your Clothes website. Also be sure that accessories such as coat belts are kept with the item. Regarding shoes, straps on sandals are particularly vulnerable, and all leather shoes should be treated before storage, so that they are good as new when you take them out to wear the following year. STORE APPROPRIATELY Summer fabrics prone to creasing like linen can be rolled to help prevent creases. Check for stains or marks as these should always be removed before storage – if in doubt launder the item as this will help keep it fresh and in great condition for next season. Silk can be wrapped in acid-free tissue paper and kept in a drawer to prevent damage and fading. Store all clothes out of direct sunlight as this will cause colours to fade. To keep clothing nice and dry it can help to reuse the silica gel sachets that come in new shoes or handbags. Winter clothes can seem harder to store as they are bulkier and require more space. Quilted or padded items, like puffa coats, are often best stored in vacuum bags, as they reduce the amount of space needed. Woollen coats and clothes need to breathe so are better in lightweight suit bags (preferably not plastic) and pop in lavender bags or cedar wood blocks to help prevent moth damage. Knitwear can be prepped like silks, with careful folding to reduce creasing and wrapping in acid-free tissue paper. Avoid storing knitwear on hangers as they may stretch. For winter boots use shoe trees or boot trees if necessary, and check for damaged zips and buckles before storage. If any shoes or boots need resoling get it done before storage so they’re ready to wear next year. If they are leather, use a leather conditioner or polish before putting them into storage. Now you can enjoy your capsule wardrobe and enjoy knowing your stored clothes are being kept in pristine condition too, ready for next season.
Views: 997 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: how to remove pilling on clothes
 
03:05
Love Your Clothes and Jade Whitson-Smith give you tips on dealing with pilling. Pilling is the bobbly effect that you get on clothing where the fibers are rubbing together. There are a few different ways of dealing this way and we’ll show you a few different techniques. The first one is to use a single-blade razor – it’s really important when you are using a razor on any of your garments, you should always use a single blade and never a double-bladed razor. If you use a double-bladed razor it could impact the actual fabric structure and create holes. Very gently rub the razor over your garments to pull away the bobbling and brush afterward. The second technique is to use a jumper comb, these are quite cheap and readily available. As they have a sharp edge to them you can just pull the comb gently over your garments and it cuts away any bobbles in a similar way to the razor technique. Afterwards again you just need to brush away the shaved off bobbles. Next technique is to use jumper stones which are very similar to pumice stones, with the same abrasive effect. What you need to do is gently rub with the stone and it pulls away the bobbles on your clothes. Another quick and easy way to remove piling is to get a jumper shaver. Most of them operate with double A batteries so ensure you have some prior to starting. Again, make sure that whichever area you are wanting to work on is nice and flat to avoid catching. Turn on your jumper shaver and start working over the bobbled areas in a circular motion on the fabric. After you have removed all your pilling it should have restored your clothing to give it that brand new look. Disclaimer: The guides contained on this site are a collection of home remedies and personal recommendations which have not been scientifically tested. No guarantees are given that following them will achieve the intended results and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. You must make your own assessment about the guides and if you choose to follow them it is at your own risk. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist.
Views: 1426 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove grass stains from clothes
 
01:33
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-grass You will need - Any one of the following: o Rubbing alcohol o Hand sanitiser o Methylated spirits or white spirit - A clean cloth - Water - Spray bottle METHOD Treat the stain as soon as possible. Make a 50:50 alcohol/hand sanitizer and water solution and spray this onto the stain. Blot with a clean cloth. IF THAT DOESN’T WORK Spray some neat rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer – methylated spirits or white spirits work too – onto the stain and dab it again with a clean cloth. Note: This stain treatment can ‘bleed’ the fabric colours, so it’s worth trying the 50:50 solution first.
Views: 33096 Love Your Clothes
Fast fix: how to replace a fly zip in trousers
 
05:49
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/fast-fix-how-replace-fly-zip-trousers YOU WILL NEED - A metal zip of the correct size and colour - Thread to match the colour of the denim and, as an optional extra, gold jeans thread - Seam ripper - Pins - Scissors - Hand-sewing needle - Thimble - Sewing machine with a zipper foot - Iron and ironing board METHOD Remove the old zip with an ‘unpicker’ or ‘stitch ripper’. Jeans are well reinforced, so you’ll need to be rougher than with other garments – just be careful not to rip the denim itself. You’ll also need to unpick a small section of the waistband to be able to remove the whole zip. Pull out all the loose threads. Take your new metal zip and position it with the zip pull facing the front of the jeans. Push the tape at the top of the zip up into the waistband, securing it with pins. Pin the rest of the zip in and then close the zip to check it’s lying flat. If the zip isn’t completely flat, you’re best off redoing this whole stage – pushing and pulling small sections of the zip is likely to make matters worse. Once your zip is pinned in, use a thread that matches the denim (rather than the original gold jeans thread). Put the zip foot onto the machine and using a medium length straight-stitch, sew the zip to the placket. This will be visible on the front of the jeans, so it’s worth making sure you’ve pinned it in a straight line. Sew a couple of reverse-stitches at either end to secure it. Sew the other side of the zip into place, following the stitch line from the original zip. Note: Jeans are bulky, so it might be tricky to get them under your sewing machine. To sew the waistband (catching in the top of the zip), you’ll usually need to put your regular presser foot back on the machine. You might find it easier to get in close to the button with your zip foot still on. But, you’ll have less control with a zip foot fitted. If in doubt, hand-stitch using a thimble. Use gold jeans thread if you want to have matching stitches. There will only be a few stitches, however, so you might prefer to stick with the denim coloured thread. Sew the bottom of the zip to the seam allowance it lies on top of. This gives the zip some strength and makes it easier to open and close.
Views: 7961 Love Your Clothes
Quick fixes: How to retrieve a lost cord
 
01:46
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/quick-fix-how-retrieve-lost-cord YOU WILL NEED - The cord from the garment - A safety pin that fits through the hole METHOD Take the cord from the garment and attach a safety pin to one end of the cord, you may want to position it sideways on so there’s no danger of it pulling through the weave and fraying your cord. Push the safety pin through the hole that the cord came out of and feed it through the tunnel. Wiggle it through the tunnel, pinch the safety pin through the fabric and then push the rest of the back along the cord until the fabric lies flat. Repeat this until the safety pin appears in the hole at the other end of the tunnel. Carefully pull the safety pin through the hole and keep pulling the cord through so it doesn’t disappear inside again. Be careful not to pull the cord too far and lose the other end. You may want to knot the end of the cord or alternatively fold the last inch of a flat cord back on itself a couple of times and sew two or three stitches with a needle and thread. This will mean that the cord ends are too thick to fit back through the holes.
Views: 534 Love Your Clothes
Family Crafts: How to make a small zipped bag or pencil case
 
04:27
Make the most of your fabric scraps to make a lovely case to keep your stationary, make-up or odds and ends in one place! To download the step by step guide to accompany this video, visit http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/refashion-upcycle. You’ll need: Outer fabric - 1 x 37cm x 23cm piece - 1 x 36cm x 5cm piece Lining fabric - 1 x 37cm x 23cm piece You will also need: - Matching zip measuring at least 25cm long - Sewing kit - Sewing machine - Seam ripper - Iron and iron board - Zipper foot Note: You can make a paper pattern if you find it easier than marking and cutting the fabric: 1 piece 37cm x 23cm and 1 piece 36cm x 5cm METHOD Place the paper pattern on your fabric, ensuring you place it straight/central to the fabric pattern. You need 3 pieces in total – 2 rectangular bag pieces (1 from outer fabric and 1 from lining fabric) and a piece of outer fabric to make the handle. Pin the pattern in place and then cut out the fabric. Place the two pieces of rectangular fabric wrong sides together and pin in place. Using a 1cm seam allowance and a straight stitch, sew along both of the shorter edges. Fold the fabric upwards from the bottom short edge so that the outer layer is now facing you. Open the zip and place it facing downwards about 0.5cm below the edge of the fabric. Pin carefully into place then hand tack in place using a brightly coloured contrasting thread (so it’s easy to see), removing pins as you sew. Attach a zipper foot to your sewing machine and machine sew the hand tacked side in using a straight stitch. Carefully unpick your tacking stitches with a seam ripper or small scissors. Change back to a standard sewing machine foot and topstitch along the right side of the bag close to the teeth of the zip using a straight stitch. Use thread that matches your fabric for neatness. Fold the fabric in half ensuring that the outer fabric is on the inside. Close the zip and match the unsewn side of the zip with the unsewn side of the fabric. Place the zip about 0.5cm below the edge of the fabric then pin and hand tack in place. Open the zip up to enable you to sew it in. Put the zipper foot on to the sewing machine and sew the second side of the zip, then remove the tacking stitches. Put the standard sewing machine foot back on to your sewing machine and topstitch from the right side (like you did for the first side). To create the handle, fold the length of fabric in half length-ways and then fold each half again in to the middle (with the wrong side on the inside). Press carefully with a hot iron. Stitch along the folded edge close to the edge. Turn the bag inside out and flatten out, ensuring the zip is approx 3cm down from the top fold. Place the handle inside the bag above the zip, leaving the raw ends sticking out slightly. Pin in place through all of the layers and then pin both side seams together. Using a 1cm seam allowance and a straight stitch, machine sew the first side seam closed. This should be the side with the handle slotted into it. You want to make this strong so after you have sewn your first seam go back over it again for strength. Open the zip halfway, so you can open the bag up when you have finished sewing, then sew the second side seam using a 1cm seam allowance and a straight stitch. Trim any excess fabric away from the side seams, leaving approx 0.5cm. Tip: if you have a zig zag stitch on your sewing machine, use it to sew over the raw edges of the fabric to stop them fraying. Turn the bag the right side out and poke the corners out carefully with a chopstick (or something similar). Tip: if the corners are very bulky you can cut diagonally across them (ensuring you do not cut the stitching) to reduce the bulk.
Views: 318 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove chocolate stains from clothes
 
02:06
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-sweat You will need - Full cream milk or cream METHOD Treat the stain as soon as possible. Soak the stain in full fat milk or cream for two to three hours. Give the stain a rub while it’s still in the milk/cream. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label. If the garment still has a slight stain, don't let it dry and wash it again. Note: • It's the fat in milk that soaks chocolate into fabric fibres to cause a stain. • This method gets the milk fats to combine with the fat in the chocolate. • As a result, the fats on the stain are diluted and the chocolate stain loosens up and floats away.
Views: 1175 Love Your Clothes
Creative crafts: make a sun cape from a man's shirt
 
12:02
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/creative-crafts-make-sun-cape-mans-shirt YOU WILL NEED - A long-sleeved man’s shirt - A 75cm length of contrasting cotton bias binding - A 75cm length of ribbon to tie the cape at the neck - Matching sewing thread - Pins - Sharp scissors - Tailor’s chalk - Sewing machine - Paper or card to make patterns METHOD Note: 1.5cm seam allowances are used throughout this make. DE-CONSTRUCTING THE SHIRT This involves five cuts: • Up the shirt side seams to the underarm position • Around the entire armholes in a circle, removing the sleeves intact • Along the front yoke seams - stop at the collar • Around the front neck curves, removing the front sections of shirt from the collar • Along the back-yoke seam, removing the back section of the shirt CUTTING OUT/PATTERN MAKING Fold the back section in half, length-ways. Make a hood pattern from a piece of card or paper, using another hood as a guide. Measure yourself from the base of your neck to the top front of your head to ensure the pattern is the correct size. Add a 1.5cm seam allowance to the curved back edge and the bottom edge of the pattern. Make a template for the new neck hole to fit the hood in to. It needs to be the same length as the bottom seam of the hood and about 4cm wide. Curve the bottom edge – the video will give you more information on how to do this. Place the neck hole template pattern onto the folded back section at the top edge, placing the curve to the bottom. Mark around the pattern piece with tailor’s chalk and then cut out. Cut a 0.5cm deep notch into the crease to mark the hood seam position. With the back still folded in half, cut a diagonal line from the shoulder to the hem - removing the original armhole seam- maximising the width of the fabric at the hem. Lay the shirt front sections right sides together, matching the plackets - button them up to secure. Place the front (straight) edge of the hood pattern to the placket edges, ensuring you have some working buttonholes and the shirt pocket (if relevant) within the hood. Cut through both layers of fabric to give you two sides of the hood. Open the sleeves out by cutting up the sleeve seams, also cutting through the cuffs. Cut away the original sleeve-head shaping by drawing/cutting a straight line across at the under arm positions. CONSTRUCTION OF THE SUN CAPE Place the hood pieces right sides together and stitch across the top curve to base of hood, then overlock or zigzag raw edges together. Overlock or zig-zag the raw edges of the back section and the sleeves. Placing right sides together, stitch the sleeves onto the back piece - on the side seams - from the top towards the hem, turning up a seam allowance of 1cm when you reach the bottom edge of the sleeve. Double-turn and hem the two long raw edges of the sleeves from the cuffs towards the neck curve. Hem the sleeve edges from the cuffs to where they join the back, then turn and hem the lower side back edges. Stitch the hood to the neck curve, matching the centre seam to the centre front notch. Trim this seam, then neaten and finish the neck curve by sewing on bias binding. To do this, you’ll need to: • Sew through all layers of cape and along one folded edge of bias binding. • Fold binding down the centre - enclosing the raw edges – and then stitch through all layers catching the folded edge of the bias binding that has not yet been sewn down. Cut two lengths of ribbon and stitch on at the seam positions just below the hood. Flip the cuffs around onto the back (in a loop). Pin in place and stitch flat onto the back of the cape.
Views: 464 Love Your Clothes
Top Tips: How to find great clothes in a charity shop
 
01:37
Find out how to update your wardrobe by finding the hidden gems at your local charity shop. Our handy hints include how to find a specific item and look for key pieces that tap into the latest trends. So, why not get stylish looks while supporting charities on your local high street. Put your new skills to the test and try it for yourself and download the step-by-step guide: http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/how-find-great-clothes-charity-shops For further inspiration, tips and guidance visit http://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/buying-clothes These top tips will help you find the best key pieces and special items when browsing in a charity shop. SHOP WITH PURPOSE Shopping in charity shops can seem daunting – but it doesn’t have to be. Shop with purpose, and begin by looking for a specific outfit, for a specific occasion. If you haven’t got an event coming up, think about this season’s trends and how you can emulate what you like on the catwalk with what you can find in your local charity shop – it’s not as hard as it looks! Always shop with your wardrobe in mind, so you can mix and match with your existing clothes and get more wear out of your new purchase. FIND KEY PIECES Look for items that will suit any season and can be accessorised to suit different trends. Find items that are versatile; for example, a plain tunic can be worn as a dress in summer, or as a top in winter. Classic styles and cuts, in neutral tones, will provide an excellent base to build any core wardrobe around. You can also have faith that the items you pick up will wash well as they’ve already been worn, washed and appreciated – unlike new items, which may not look the same after their first wash. For those highly seasonal items (such as heavy winter knits or lightweight silk tops) it can help to think a season or two ahead – it never hurts to be prepared and you will often discover great finds when you’re looking before everyone else! Be creative with the pieces you find, often something as simple as changing the buttons or accessorising with a funky brooch can really enhance an item. LOOK FOR THE ‘GOLDEN RAIL’ Many charity shops will have a special rail set aside for unique items, vintage or high-end designer pieces. Keep an eye out for it or ask the staff if they have anything special in store – they may have something out the back or elsewhere in the shop that’s not on display. Remember to always look at the cut and quality of an item, for example if it is lined it is likely to last longer. ENJOY THE PROCESS Remember to try things on – it’s amazing how different things can look off the hanger! Have a good rummage and see if there’s anything good hidden away, especially as items can easily get mixed up on the rails. Try to take your time and not rush your visit. Don’t restrict yourself to looking in one section: the sizing can often be off, and it’s more important to look for colours or styles that you are interested in, regardless of where you find it in the shop. PASS ON PRELOVED CLOTHES Remember, if you’ve fallen out of love with a piece of your own clothing then it could be time for you to pass it on to a charity shop so it can find a new, loving home. Your unwanted pieces can be donated and might end up being somebody else’s newfound treasure – or even make it onto the ‘golden rail’.
Views: 631 Love Your Clothes
Stain removal: how to remove coffee stains from clothes
 
01:54
These stain removal guides are a collection of ‘home remedies’ which have not been scientifically tested. These guides are not suitable for any clothing that requires dry-cleaning only or has other special cleaning instructions such as silk, delicate fabrics, suede and leather. No guarantees are given that any stain will be removed completely when following these guides and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage or permanent marking caused to any clothing after following these guides. You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/stain-removal-removing-coffee You will need - Either white vinegar of a beaten egg METHOD USING VINEGAR Use the vinegar undiluted and rub it onto the stain. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label. METHOD USING VINEGAR AND WATER Make a solution of three parts vinegar and one part water. Soak the stain in the solution overnight. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label. METHOD WITH A BEATEN EGG Apply a beaten egg to the stain and rub it in. Wash the garment following the instructions on the care label.
Views: 1464 Love Your Clothes
Creative Crafts: How to upcycle an old jumper into a sparkling Christmas Jumper
 
02:59
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/creative-crafts-how-upcycle-old-jumper-new-christmas-jumper NOTE We hope that you find the tips and suggestions in these videos and guides helpful and fun to follow. Please note that no guarantees are given that any results will be achieved when following our guides. We recommend that you avoid using highly flammable materials and if the product is intended for use by a child that care is taken with small parts. The products shown in our guides are not intended for use by children under the age of three. YOU WILL NEED - Jumper to transform into a Christmas jumper – if you don’t have a jumper at home that you want to use, you should be able to find something suitable in a charity shop - Upcycled fabric for your design - Simple Christmas design or image - Fusible web suitable for appliqué - Sequins, bells, sparkly bits to decorate the jumper - Sewing kit - Iron and ironing board - A pair of pliers (if you are using metal chain) to cut it to size METHOD Using a pencil draw or trace your design onto the paper side of the fusible web. Use a hot iron with no steam. Carefully press the fusible web with the design on it onto the reverse side of the fabric. The glue side touches the back of your fabric and the iron touches the paper side. Cut the design out and then peel off the paper layer. The glue should be fused to the reverse side of your fabric. Lay the cut-out design in place on the jumper. The glue side facing down onto the right side of your jumper. Remember not to put any scraps of fabric in the bin – any offcuts that can’t be used should be taken to a textiles bank. Use a pressing cloth or tea towel between the jumper and the hot iron as this will protect the fabric (some fabrics will burn or melt if you iron on to them directly). Press on top of the pressing cloth. Using a sewing machine and matching coloured thread and a straight stitch, stitch the design around the edges (you need the stitches to hold it in place and make it last). Have a play around with your decorations and sparkly bits to find something that works well visually. A pom pom can make a cool red nose! This is your time to be creative. Securely hand sew all your decorations in place, taking extra care if the Christmas jumper is for a child.
Views: 486 Love Your Clothes
Fabric focus: how to dye clothes and faded fabric
 
02:33
Love Your Clothes and Jade Whitson-Smith give you advice for when dyeing garments. Dyeing your clothes is really great for two different reasons. The first is it helps to bring life back into a garment, you might want to update it or give it a new look. The second is that it allows you to restore faded and warn garments back to their former glory. This is really useful for items such as jeans, especially black jeans, that have faded to a slightly grey colour. The first thing you need to think about is if you are going to dye a garment, what type of fibre is your garment made of, consider if it’s cotton, polyester, acrylic – that will help you when it comes to thinking about which dye to buy. There are lots of different dyes available out there, some that can just be thrown into your washing machine, others that you do in cold water. The ones used in cold water are often easier to use and it means that you don’t have to wash your washing machine out several times after using the dye. Make sure to read the instructions on the back of your dye very carefully, sometimes you need to add salt to the dye mix (table salt will work great). When doing a cold water dye, you will need a bucket or container that is large enough to fit your garment easily. It’s better than using your sink as it means you can get a good volume of water to mix with the dye and it avoids making a mess of your counters and surfaces. When you’re ready to dye, follow the instructions on your dye packet and your newly dyed garments will be looking revitalised and as good as new. Disclaimer: The guides contained on this site are a collection of home remedies and personal recommendations which have not been scientifically tested. No guarantees are given that following them will achieve the intended results and WRAP accepts no responsibility for any damage caused as a result of following these guides. You must make your own assessment about the guides and if you choose to follow them it is at your own risk. Always read and follow the use and care instructions that come with any products and if in doubt you should seek advice from a specialist.
Views: 206 Love Your Clothes
Creative crafts: make a halter neck dress from a man's shirt
 
14:16
You can find instructions on the Love Your Clothes site: https://www.loveyourclothes.org.uk/videos/creative-crafts-make-halter-neck-dress-mans-shirt YOU WILL NEED - A man’s shirt - Sewing thread in a colour to match the shirt - Tailor’s chalk – for marking, cutting and sewing lines - Scissors - Pins - Long ruler - Sewing machine - Iron and ironing board METHOD DE-CONSTRUCTING THE SHIRT Unpick the collar and remove the loose threads. Cut up the side seams to the armholes. Cut around the entire armhole in a circle, removing the sleeve intact. Repeat for the other sleeve. Cut along the front yoke seams, removing the front sections. Fold the back-shirt section in half then lay it flat on a table. Re-shape the back-neck line – this will become the new front neck. On the centre fold-line, mark 3cm down from the current neck line then draw in a new curved line from that point to the top neck point. Cut along the line you’ve just drawn - through both layers of fabric - to remove the excess fabric. Cut a small notch 0.5cm deep in the centre of the neck hole. Draw a diagonal line from the top neck point to about 3cm in from the underarm seam. On our shirt this was 34cm long, but this measurement will vary according to the shirt size. Draw another diagonal line, from the end of the line you’ve just drawn (by the underarm seam) towards the hem. This will maximise the width of the material by the hem. Cut along both lines you’ve drawn in Steps 9 and 10, through both layers of fabric. This will become the dress front. Lay the shirt-front sections right sides together, matching the placket edges. Remember to do the buttons up. Draw a diagonal line from the second button down (from the top neck) to the underarm position, then cut along this line. This will become the sides and back of the dress. Lay the sleeves out flat, using the original underarm seam as a guide. Place the two sleeves right sides together, matching the underarm seams. Draw, and then cut, a diagonal line from the underarm to the centre fold, removing the sleeve head shaping and creating a point. MAKING THE DRESS Overlock or zig-zag all the raw edges of the dress’s front and back sections. On the straight side edge of each front dress section, do a narrow single turn to the wrong side of the fabric. Then do a straight machine stitch on top of the overlocking stitch to create a narrow single hem. Do a narrow single hem along the diagonal edges of the back dress, nearest to the neck hole. Working from the centre outwards, re-attach one layer of the collar to the neck hole, matching the central notches. The easiest way to do this is to attach the single layer of fabric that doesn’t have the interfacing on. Repeat on the other side of the collar. Re-close the collar by using a straight stitch to edge-stitch the two collar edges together. Stitch the unhemmed sections of the fronts to the back from the underarm down Top-stitch the seams and hem the lower sides of the back section. Place the dress onto a tailor’s dummy or a body. Fasten the neck/collar button at the back of the neck. Wrap the sides around to the back and do up the buttons - the buttons may need to be moved. Lift and pin the lower sections (which were the side fronts) on to what were the lower side backs at the side seam. This will fill in the gap at the sides and create a draping bustle effect. Machine-stitch in place at the sides. MAKING THE BELT Place both sleeves together, undo the cuff button on one of the sleeves and put your arm inside. With your fingers, pinch the under-arm seams of the sleeves together and turn inside out so that one sleeve is inside the other. Pin around the circumference of the top of the sleeves, matching the underarm seam. Using a 1cm seam, stitch sleeves together in a circle, pivoting at the pointed area. Turn back the right way out. Treating both layers of fabric as one, create three pleats centrally on the seam you’ve just sewn. Then stitch them down through all the layers - this will make the sleeves look a bit like a cummerbund. Press the dress. Place the belt on the dress and tie the ends in a knot at the back.
Views: 615 Love Your Clothes

40 singles dating south africa
entj dating enfp
dating ukrainian brides
speed dating iowa
dating chat rooms for 15 year olds