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Videos uploaded by user “Lon Hosford”
CreateJS - How to Animate a Shape With TweenJS
 
04:52
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This lesson shows how to use the Tween JS library to animate a Shape on the HTML5 canvas.
Views: 5800 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - How to Add a Linear Gradient Background
 
04:46
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This lesson shows how to create a linear gradient fill as static background for an animation. The EaselJS beginLinearGradientFill method arguments are explained and demonstrated. You start to use layering in EaselJS Container classes. Practice Files: See the Udemy course link above.
Views: 2320 Lon Hosford
Viewport and Scaling CSS Media Query Mobile First Responsive Design
 
04:47
Mobile web browsers will spoil all your work in responsive web design unless you have the proper settings for scaling and widths. My blog article and source files: http://bit.ly/1jl4yLa Audience: Those who are new to CSS Cascading Style Sheets for mobile development. This is third video in a series to build a framework for CSS Cascading Style Sheets following the mobile first responsive design approach. This video shows explains viewports versus page widths and device widths and scaling. At then end of the series this will be part of a template you can use to target smartphones, mobile tables like the iPad, and laptops and desktops. Mobile web browsers may scale down your web page. That may result in an attractive and unreadable content. They may also not show the full width of your page. This makes the user resize and horizontally scroll your page. Or worse they might just hit the back button so you may find the work that you put into designing your page becomes ineffective. The mobile version of Safari introduced the viewport meta tag. This allows the web developers to control the viewport's size and scaling. For the name attribute you just simply set it equals to the keyword viewport. The content attribute is set equals to a comma delimited list of name value pairs.
Views: 5883 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - How to Draw A Circle using EaselJS
 
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32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This lesson uses Easel JS to draw a circle on the HTML5 canvas element.
Views: 3607 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - How to Add Easing to a Tween
 
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32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW In this lesson you apply TweenJS easing methods to an animation.
Views: 2037 Lon Hosford
@media Device Breakpoints CSS Media Query Mobile First Responsive Design
 
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Targeting the breakpoint for device widths is a design choice. A simplified version of the CSS Cascading Style Sheet @media selector is used for this direction. Blog article and source files: http://bit.ly/1jMz3wm Audience: Those who are new to CSS Cascading Style Sheets for mobile development. This is fourth video in a series to build a framework for CSS Cascading Style Sheets following the mobile first responsive design approach. This video breaks breaks down the media query syntax and sorts out key items for a simplified method to target key device widths and provide a flexible design for device widths in between. It also handles the mobile first problem of what to do once you get to a screen on a desktop substantially wider than your content. Mobile first designs target all mobile device by using screen widths. This is example adds the meta element for viewport to base screen Cascading Style Sheet discussed in previous videos. This will be necessary so that progressive media queries introduced later used to detect wider device screen widths work at the device width break points At then end of the series this will be part of a template you can use to target smartphones, mobile tables like the iPad, and laptops and desktops.
Views: 8643 Lon Hosford
How to use Stripe Checkout Remember Me
 
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Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses The Stripe checkout form can save your customer's payment information using the Remember me feature. This session we use the Remember me features to get the user experience. We also learn the options for disabling the feature if necessary. Want to see how the Stripe checkout form can save your customer's payment information? In this session we learn how the "Remember me" checkbox works. So lets start working with it. Stripe allows customers to save payment data like a credit card. This is a default feature for the checkout form. Knowing how to use it can also be helpful in your testing. This is done via the "Remember me" check box. Stripe associates a payment method with an email address and a phone number. So lets try this out. Open the checkout_simple.php file that you are working on in your web browser. Click the "Pay with Card" button. It not apparent, but Stripe attempts to detect a signed in "Remember me" visitor. If it cannot, a blank version of the checkout form appears. Now we will create a "Remember me" customer for testing. Fill in a test email address that you have not used in the course. Use one of the Stripe testing credit card numbers. Repeating the number 42 is a fast way to go about that. Then add any expiration date in the future and any three digit CVC. Now you can click the "Remember me" check box. Stripe then requests a mobile phone number. We will see how that is used in a bit. Just to note, the user can proceed in any order in filling out the form. Not until an email address and the other data is complete does "Remember me" have any meaning. In testing you can enter any phone number. But you may want to use your own mobile phone so that you can simulate how it works. Just to note, if you do, then you will be getting text messages. Press the "Pay $20.00" button and your checkout is complete. Your customer will receive a phone message that they have saved payment information with Stripe. It will include your company name shown in the checkout form. A kinda a free marketing bump. Now we can simulate a customer who is signed into Stripe. Reload the web page. Click the "Pay with Card" button. Stripe has recognized an email address as being signed into Stripe. This is associated with your web site. The payment information is pre-filled for them. Press the "Pay $20.00" button and the checkout step is completed. Now we will sign out the Stripe "Remember me" customer. First reload the web page. Click the "Pay with Card" button. We will need the email address in the form so make a note of it. Click the "Log out" link. Keep in mind the login has to do with Stripe and not your web site. Lets just confirm that no Stripe "Remember me" customer is signed in. Reload the web page. Click the "Pay with Card" button. The blank form is our sign that no Stripe customer is signed in. So you can close the form. Now we will sign in our Stripe "Remember me" test customer. Click the "Pay with Card" button again. As you see we get the same blank form. Enter the same email address that you used to create the "Remember me" customer. Now you will be presented with a verification screen. This is so that you can use the saved payment information. A security code is sent by SMS. It goes to the phone number associated with the email address and your web site. Notice that your company name shows in the message. Once sent, the screen updates with part of the receiving phone number masked. Then that is removed with a simple Sent message. Keep in mind SMS messaging is not perfect. If it fails, there is an opt out for the user. After about 8 seconds the user is offered to enter their payment information manually. Selecting that or the back arrow in the top left corner returns to checkout screen. Then the user is back to re-entering all the payment information. Also worth noting is that the "Remember me" checkbox is still available. So if the user wants to store the payment information again they can. But they still need to enter all the payment information. If the security code is valid, the payment data is again pre-filled. Now you can just cancel out of this checkout form. This gives you the flow for a returning "Remember me" Stripe customer. Keep in mind that this has nothing to do with any separate login that you have for your customers. You may find that you have an integration need that requires removing the Remember me checkbox. So lets open the code and try that out. To do this you need to add the data-allow-remember-me attribute to the script element. You set its value to false. You can paste this from the second code snippet and then save. Reload the web page and click the "Pay with Card" button. Now the "Remember me" button is removed. Saving payment information is no longer possible for this form. But customers can still use their saved Stripe payment information if it was previously created.
Views: 1828 Lon Hosford
CSS JQuery Image Cross Fade Animation Tutorial Introduction
 
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This is part of a 10 part tutorial series to learn how to cross dissolve images, also called cross fade animation, in a web page and at the same time learn more about using JQuery in combination with HTML, CSS and Javascript. Designed for beginners looking to learn from practical examples. The final example is reusable in other web pages. The HTML tags for the cross fade effect are designed so they would be independent of the demo web page. This way you can reuse the completed version in your other web pages and style as you like. For CSS you learn to configure the position static, position absolute, position releative and z-index properties to stack images at the same location. You will use JQuery fadeOut, JQuery next, JQuery addClass, JQuery removeClass, JQuery css, JQuery prop, JQuery show, JQuery length and JQuery first filter. Just standard Javascript core programming skills including variables and control structures are used so it is easy to follow. The example is built from the ground up with a mimimal starting code. This way there is no complicated starting set of code to wrap your head around before you can comfortably follow along. The steps start with the HTML, add the CSS and then the Javascript and JQuery are added. Source files: http://bit.ly/1q9f399 See readme.txt to follow along. This is the introduction outlining what you will learn.
Views: 1179 Lon Hosford
Overview and Demo CSS Media Query Mobile First Responsive Design
 
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My blog article and source files: http://bit.ly/1h6irYA Audience: Those who are new to CSS Cascading Style Sheets for mobile development. This is first video in a series to build a framework for CSS Cascading Style Sheets following the mobile first responsive design approach. This video shows the testing demonstrated using Firefox responsive design tools. Mobile first designs target all mobile device by using screen widths. You start out with a base screen Cascading Style Sheet. Then using progressive media queries to detect wider and wider device screen widths, overrides to Cascading Style Sheets are applied. At then end of the series you have a template to target smartphones, mobile tables like the iPad, and laptops and desktops. Designing for mobile first is very easy if you have a single column of text and add the CSS img {height: auto; width: 100%; } to make the images flexible. But ultimately you design multiple column layouts and graphics that may not be suitable for dynamic resizing across the wide width spectrum of viewing screens that your visitor may be using.
Views: 5464 Lon Hosford
@media Link Tag CSS Media Query Mobile First Responsive Design
 
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You can use the link element media attribute as an alternative to the CSS @media selector Blog article and source files: http://bit.ly/1jS2ivp Audience: Those who are new to CSS Cascading Style Sheets for mobile development. Welcome to this segment in our series on using CSS media queries to create a mobile first, responsive design. Now we are ready to explore approaches for organizing your mobile first responsive design CSS. So far we placed all our CSS and the media queries into one HTML document. You might say we should use the HTML link tag to load external CSS files. You would point out this is how we share CSS across multiple HTML documents. And you are right! The approach we will demonstrate uses multiple separate CSS files. One file will contain the base CSS and one file for each targeted screen width. But do we still need the media query selectors? Media query selectors are just CSS. They will work the same in external CSS files. However the HTML link tag has a media attribute. Conveniently it uses the same media queries syntax as the CSS media selector. This how we are going to do our example. Now this is just one approach. You need to consider other possible approaches. So we will also sketch out basic organizational alternatives. Then investigate the performance criteria involved. This approach can work well for you. It reduces the length of CSS and organized the targets into separate files. But by adding four css file we have also exposed four http network requests. Network requests provide overhead that could impact timing. For light weight traffic requirements this should not be significant. If it is a problem consider some alternatives. The obvious approach is to use one external css file. In that approach place the same css we had in the style tag into that file. Another approach is to have two css files. One for the base and one for the screen width changes. Then attach this after the base css file without the html link tag media attribute. The media selectors in the file will do the detections. In the beginning of our series we learned about other media query tests. For example we could test for screen resolution or orientation. Your design requirements increase when targeting particular design features. This can result in more media queries for the same target minimum widths. In that case you may consider our approach in the example we completed. The first css file is for smart phone widths. Second for tablet widths. The last for laptops and desktops. Each represents the base css for that target minimum width. Then within that target minimum width group you can add additional media queries targeting special cases. Such as a different pixel density image for a retina device versus a legacy device. You just add css media selectors within the css file for those special circumstances.
Views: 2902 Lon Hosford
HTML CSS JQuery Media Query Mobile First Project Review
 
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My blog article and source files: http://bit.ly/1h6irYA Audience: Those who are new to CSS Cascading Style Sheets for mobile development. This is second video in a series to build a framework for CSS Cascading Style Sheets following the mobile first responsive web design approach. This video shows reviews the project file used in the video. The file contains the base CSS Cascading Style Sheets for all the responsive design views. Mobile first designs target all mobile device by using screen widths. This is the base screen Cascading Style Sheet discussed. Progressive media queries are later used to detect wider device screen widths, overrides the CSS Cascading Style Sheet shown in the base project file. At then end of the series you have a template to target smartphones, mobile tables like the iPad, and laptops and desktops. Let's take a look at the starting project file for this video series so you are more comfortable with the HTML and CSS that's already in place. Here is our starting practice file opened up in Firefox. And we also have the Firebug plugin opened. We will use the Firebug just to get a quick familiarity with the actual HTML that we have setup. So first let's take a look at that down here in the HTML panel you can see it's a very simple structure we have an html5 header tag. We have a section tag both siblings of each other. The header tag has an h1 tag in it. And the section tag has an h2 to tag and two p tags in it. There isn't too much to that. If we use Firebug we can actually highlight over these and you can see them up here in the browser window as they're being selected. And we can also see the layout over on the right hand side. And if you look at the layout panel you'll notice that each of the tag elements that are in our document are set up for a position property of static. So that means they just flow one after another down the page as you might expect in a normal flow layout. The CSS is that the document level so we can take that tag in open up there's the style tag with the CSS. Or we can view it over here in the CSS panel for Firebug. There's nothing too surprising in the CSS for this document. We will notice that first the header and section elements are being set so they recognized for legacy browsers. Then we're using the universal selector to set color margin and padding for all the other elements. The body has a background in a family for the fonts. The header section we are targeting inside the header element the h1 for its properties such as background font size height padding and line with. And then the other major part of the documents is the section element and it has internally an h2 and a p tag and we are also targeting those. These are our base CSS selectors styles and properties. And they will apply into all different types of views including a iPhone view or a Samsung Galaxy view or an iPad or any tablet view or even as you see them right here on our web browser which is a rather wide width web browser in a very large monitor. So what we'll do is we'll modify these properties and selectors based on detecting the width of the screen using CSS media queries. And we'll do that so that are view looks more appropriate for that particular width. But first we'll start by understanding how the default mobile device width and scaling is controlled. You may have noticed web pages on your smartphone too tiny to read and requiring horizontal scrollingvto view them. We can then then start detecting device widths using CSS media queries.
Views: 3299 Lon Hosford
HTML CSS Javascript JQuery Webpage Popup Dialog Tutorial
 
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You are probably familiar with seeing popup dialog boxes when visiting web sites. This is a tutorial to show you how to make a web page modal popup using HTML, CSS, Javascript and JQuery. The modal aspect means the user needs to deal with the popup before continuing any interaction with the web page. Source files: http://www.lonhosford.com/make-jquery-custom-popup Topics: Building the CSS and HTML for an Informational Popup Add the Javascript and JQuery for Opening and Closing the Popup Positioning the Popup and Handling Resizing and Screen Orientations Add Page Content Overlay that Can Close the Popup Automatically Open on Page Load
Views: 21721 Lon Hosford
PHP How to List File Directories Recursively with Iterators
 
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Source file and blog article for this video can be found at http://bit.ly/1n3jZsZ This video shows the use of the PHP RecursiveDirectoryIterator class and RecursiveIteratorIterator class to traverse file directories to get a list of files and folders. You can use it to get information on one file, one directory or any level of child directories. The example is designed for to display a list of files and directories in debugging. The script can be adapted for other uses such as changing files or gathering information on files.
Views: 2824 Lon Hosford
CSS Responsive  Multiple Column Flexible Layout Tutorial
 
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This demonstrates a two column CSS layout with flexible images for a responsive mobile first design. You use the mobile first design approach and the flexible image design first technique. You will use link elements to target the screen width breakpoint detection and select the CSS files. These files will progressively modify styles as the screen width increases. Then within each width you see how to add @media selector queries to handle specific needs such as screen orientation and intermediate screen widths. Now you have a basic responsive layout example. It uses the mobile first and flexible image approach. It uses link elements to target the screen width detection. Then it progressively adds styles as width breakpoints increase. Then within each width breakpoint we added media queries to handle specific needs such as screen orientation an intermediate screen widths. Blog article and source files: http://bit.ly/1mtCiWC
Views: 3759 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - Installation and Bootstrapping
 
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32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This video examines the installation and bootstrapping of Create JS libraries for use in this series. CreateJS library download link: http://code.createjs.com
Views: 2751 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - Introducing TweenJS and Ticker
 
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32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This lesson is background information for using the Tween JS library and the Easel JS Library Ticker class.
Views: 2284 Lon Hosford
Geology Lecture Part 3
 
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Fiery Furnace hike Arches National Park geology lecture at Natural Arch
Views: 814 Lon Hosford
PHP Debugging Create a Simple Library
 
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File downloads and blog article at http://www.lonhosford.com/lonblog/2014/02/28/creating-a-simple-php-debug-library/ Creating a Simple PHP Debug Library Produced By Lon Hosford You are going to learn about a basic setup for handling debugging and testing in your PHP scripts. This can help you get more work done and with better quality. You can use this setup in both procedural and objected oriented PHP applications. Also you might find this handy for PHP applications that you have inherited and did not leave you any breadcrumbs for testing and debugging. We start by looking at the script serving as a central point for all debugging and testing. Consider it your debugging dashboard. At a minimum you want a quick way to display key information: For example we are displaying the PHP versions both expected and detected. You want to add the same information for other libraries and technologies you are using as well. For example a database like MySQL. You also want to see the PHP date and time setting for your target time zone. And key PHP debugging settings. All of these we will explore in the code. As you proceed with development, you then add links to the debugging dashboard for testing your code. The effort to design your code to run from one or more test links on the debugging dashboard, forces you to build smaller testable code units. For example a database login script, you might add a link for a valid login, a link for invalid user name, a link link for an invalid password, maybe a small form to let you try any testing values and so on for all the tests that need checking when your code changes. Also you want a library for configuring your debugging environment. For example you would use it to turn on and off debugging messages. When you go to deploy to other environments such as staging or production, you can quickly visit the library and configure the debugging options appropriate for that environment. For example you can turn on or off the PHP option to return its errors along with the content output. Something good for debugging but not so good for your web site visitors. At a minimum you want a quick way to display key information: about the running software environment, tests you are running, and debugging choices. For example we are displaying the PHP versions both expected and detected. You want to add the same information for other libraries and technologies you are using as well. For example a database like MySQL. You also want to see the PHP date and time setting for your target time zone. And key PHP debugging settings. As you proceed with development, you then add links to the debugging dashboard for testing your code. The effort to design your code to run from one or more test links on the debugging dashboard, forces you to build smaller testable code units.
Views: 1339 Lon Hosford
How to Make Stripe PHP eCommerce Checkout Pages
 
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Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses Web developers, want to start learning how to take bank card payments using Stripe and PHP? Well here is a brief introduction to the course content. Our focus is to make use of the Stripe multiple device checkout form. You can use it to do a lot of the heavy lifting for eCommerce. For example you will not need keep any sensitive customer payment data on your servers. Stripe also has a robust API. You can use it with PHP as well as with other languages. This course starts with how to set up the development environment to use Stripe. If you have an up to date PHP web server running at your disposal, you are just about all set. But if not, we will outline all that you need to have one in place. You may know that a digital certificate is expected for eCommerce. We will make recommendations depending on your goals. But do not panic, as you can follow the course without one. You also will be needing a Stripe account. We will walk you through all of what you need to set one up for the course. And also we will cover that for live deployment. You also experience what it is like to be a "Remember Me" customer. This is a neat Stripe feature that lets customers save their banking data for your web site. Then we will do some coding using the Stripe API. We do that through the free library that Stripe provides to PHP developers. As we do we will learn how to use the Stripe PHP library documentation. All the possible requests and responses are described there. This includes all the data sent and returned by the Stripe servers. We also make a point to follow the data to the Stripe servers and back. We do that with the Stripe Dashboard. This will increase your effectiveness when testing and troubleshooting. And we finish with an integrated working example. It may not look like much, but it has all the components and a framework that you can build upon. This course for the newcomer to PHP, Stripe and web development. If you have some light experience with all of these technologies, you should be good to go. But we intend to work professionally. So everything you learn has a good foundation in best practices and usefulness. And yes that includes testing our work as we go. And if you find something that you need help on, do not hold back no matter how insignificant you think it is. Often others may have the same need and its helps us all by sharing. Well thats our first wrap. Take a look at the Instruction Guide to help get a sense for how the course files are organized and presented. See you at the next session.
Views: 1825 Lon Hosford
JQuery Ajax PHP Dynamic Content Loading
 
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This example shows how to dynamically load HTML content from PHP into an HTML element using JQuery and AJAX. Use this link https://www.lonhosford.com/jq-ajax-php-dynamic-content-loading to get source files and a written explanation for this video. You might want to do this when the main page content has all the needed SEO material but there is a lot of additional content such as course or code files that can be loaded on visitor demand. For example a course page or tutorial page where you have all the summary and details about the course or tutorial that would satisfy SEO. Then you can have the user load the particular items they want. This example provides the basic elements in JQuery, HTML, AJAX and PHP for a potential architecture to do that and then build upon further. This example has three buttons. Two are for loading content and one for clearing so we can play a bit while testing. Do not expect the user will need to clear the data. The JQuery ajax method in wrapped in a generic Javascript function to send NVP data and receive HTML content calling a success or fail function in the presentation level Javascript code. The PHP on the server side has a simple controller and loads content from text files based on the AJAX request data.
Views: 15765 Lon Hosford
How to Setup A Stripe Payment System Account
 
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Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses This explains how to setup a Stripe payment platform account. Setting up a Stripe account for basic learning is easy and fast. You can even start using Stripe without providing an email address if you like. Stripe also provides you with a dashboard. It is the hub for your account. Your live and testing transaction data is stored there. A new Stripe account has three statuses. You can call them account states if you like. The first is an unsaved account. You provide no information and have no login. Test transaction data is stored. Dashboard access to the data is restricted to the web browser on the computer that you created the account. You can also have a saved account that is not activated. For a saved account you need to validate an email address. You will have a login password. Any test data is saved and accessible on other computers and web browsers. The last status is an activated account. It saves both test and live data. Here you have to provide Stripe with financial and tax information. Stripe will then validate your company and identification data. You can use either an unsaved or unactivated saved account for the course exercises. They are easy and fast to setup. Both let you work with test data. They allow you to simulate live Stripe transactions in a sandbox mode. The recommended minimum for the course is to have a Saved account. You do not need to activate it. A saved account's testing data is available wherever you work. To get a Stripe account, go to their website. The web design that you see here may have changed. Just look for buttons or links for either Sign up or Sign in. If you elect to Sign in, the form probably has a Sign up link. Either way you will end up on a form to create an account. If you want an unsaved account, choose the "skip this step", button or link. Do not worry you can convert it to a saved account later. Otherwise its best to create the account with your email and a password. Either way you eventually come to your Stripe Dashboard. You use the dashboard for maintaining your account. And it is where you monitor and manage transactional data. he dashboard has a toggle button to switch between working with live or test data. Test mode works for all new account statuses. Only an activated account can work in live mode. In either mode you can make changes. For example adding customers, making refunds, deleting customers, creating coupons and much more. This includes interacting with your web site using the Stripe API. If you started with an unsaved account, you may later decide that you want to save your data. The dashboard has a link to save the account. Just provide an email address and password. An unactivated account will warn you about live features that you cannot use. Both live mode and test mode look and work alike. But they have separate data. In the test mode view you are seeing sandboxed data and transactions. Customers, their credit cards and your bank accounts are not charged. You can safely delete all test mode data at any time. In live mode view you are seeing and working with actual data and transactions. This includes your own bank account! There are a lot of Dashboard choices available. Don't panic as we will learn them as we use them. They provide all the data about your account and transactions. There is summary level data with graphs on the dashboard choice. Then you have lists such as the list of customers. List items often have more details. And choices to manage the data. For a new account, the reports will be wanting for data. As we get working and create transactions, you will see these screens fill up with information. Then we will look closer at all of it to see what is meaningful to you. One other item to get a quick look at is your Account Settings. Account settings cover a wide range of items. You may want to delete all the test data to start fresh.You find that under the Data choice. You might want to be informed by email when you get a payment. The Emails choice has options for getting messages.
Views: 10777 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - How to Reverse a Tween Using Chaining
 
02:03
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW Practice Files: Available at http://bit.ly/1emuUYh. In this lesson we modify a Tween to reverse the animation back to its starting point.
Views: 2020 Lon Hosford
How to Rotate a Sprite in Cocos2d Tutorial
 
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Tutorial web page http://www.lonhosford.com/cocos2d-v2-rotate-a-sprite-tutorial contains more information and downloads. This is a demonstration of how to rotate a sprite 180 degrees Cocos2d Version 2.0 xCode project. Intended audience is new to Cocos2d and has fundamental knowledge of xCode and Objective C. Ideally you are looking for kickstart atomic examples for the basic concepts. More Cocos2d Ice Breaker Tutorials: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2787204FFE36BB9E
Views: 3014 Lon Hosford
Adding More Images for JQuery Image Cross Fade CSS Animation
 
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Source files: http://bit.ly/1q9f399. See readme.txt if you want to follow along. This is the sixth step in this tutorial on how to do cross fade images using JQuery in a web page. For this video we test the impact of adding more img elements to our JQuery image cross fade project. And we analyze how the z-index stacking order works. This is part of a 10 part tutorial series to learn how to cross dissolve images, also called cross fade, in a web page and at the same time learn more about using JQuery in combination with HTML, CSS and Javascript. Designed for beginners looking to learn from practical examples. The final example is reusable in other web pages. The HTML tags for the cross fade effect are designed so they would be independent of the demo web page. This way you can reuse the completed version in your other web pages and style as you like. For CSS you learn to configure the position static, position absolute, position releative and z-index properties to stack images at the same location. You will use JQuery fadeOut, JQuery next, JQuery addClass, JQuery removeClass, JQuery css, JQuery prop, JQuery show, JQuery length and JQuery first filter. Just standard Javascript core programming skills including variables and control structures are used so it is easy to follow. The example is built from the ground up with a mimimal starting code. This way there is no complicated starting set of code to wrap your head around before you can comfortably follow along. The steps start with the HTML, add the CSS and then the Javascript and JQuery are added.
Views: 556 Lon Hosford
How to Create PHP Stripe Subscription Database Using MySQL
 
02:37
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses What do you need for a database to track customers in a subscription service? This covers the database needs to handle Stripe recurring payments for a PHP based subscription service This section covers the creation of an SQLite3 database with a customers table. It includes the code to add records to the customers table and the testing code. So lets see what we need to do to get that done. We will create a database infrastructure that will be independent of the application and of the user interface. To do that we learn how to use the PHP PDO library to interact with the database. This will make it easy to change database engines. Our database engine for the course is SQLite3. It is easy to set up. And its lets us write code that we can reuse with other databases. To help with that we learn to use the Firefox SQLite Manager. It makes accessing the database easy. And we can use it to help us in testing and learning. We will create a script to configure the database settings. For SQLite3 that is simply the location and name of the database file. We will create a script to configure the database settings. For SQLite3 that is simply the location and name of the database file. We will include in the script checks for the correct installed libraries. And we will set the database to throw PHP exceptions for error handling. We will also write the SQL statements to create a customers table. The table will handle the data for logging into our service. We will also keep some profile information about the customer in our database. And we will have fields to track the customer subscription status. And to process this SQL we also use the PHP PDO library. Another SQL statement that we write adds the new customers that subscribe to our service. Some of that data is coming from user input. So we will learn how to use the PDO library to protect the SQL statement from tampering. And we are also encrypting the customer's login password for another level of security. Wow it does look like a lot to cover. But we will break it down. Then we put it together step by step as you go through this section. For example we will write testing scripts. They will help you understand what is in the code and how it works. Plus they help insure that database code is error free. Well thats a wrap. Time to tool up and to get going! See you at the first session.
Views: 1266 Lon Hosford
CSS Layout JQuery Image Cross Fade Animation Tutorial
 
05:24
Source files: http://bit.ly/1q9f399 See readme.txt if you want to follow along. When working with JQuery it is often tempting to build the HTML and CSS based on the JQuery code. So you have a chicken and egg decision when you start. The approach we take is to build the HTML and CSS for a great initial structure and style when the page loads. That's the egg. Here you are focused on search engine optimization and initial load style presentation. Then you can use the power of JQuery to search through your HTML and CSS to add the behavior without changes to the HTML and CSS. Now we have a chicken to make talk and walk. This process sequence is not concrete. Its just a great starting point so if you find a compelling reason to modify the HTML and CSS for something you are coding in CSS, do not hold back. But try to solve your problem in Javascript and JQuery before doing so. And try to avoid modifying the structure presented to the search engines and the initial styling. This second video provides an overview to the course files so you are comfortable with following the changes we are going to make. It then follows the approach of building the HTML and CSS first. This is the first step for this tutorial on how to do cross fade images using JQuery in a web page. The video reviews the practice HTML and CSS files already in place so you are comfortable with following the changes we are going to make. We will layout the demo page. Then we will layout the fade out elements and prepare them for the initial view when the page renders. We use the CSS position and z-index properties. For the CSS position property we see how to use the relative and absolute values to make the cross fade image positioning independent of the demo page. For z-index we set the value needed for the image we want to see first when the page renders. This is part of a 10 part tutorial series to learn how to cross dissolve images, also called cross fade, in a web page and at the same time learn more about using JQuery in combination with HTML, CSS and Javascript. Designed for beginners looking to learn from practical examples. The final example is reusable in other web pages. The HTML tags for the cross fade effect are designed so they would be independent of the demo web page. This way you can reuse the completed version in your other web pages and style as you like. For CSS you learn to configure the position static, position absolute, position releative and z-index properties to stack images at the same location. You will use JQuery fadeOut, JQuery next, JQuery addClass, JQuery removeClass, JQuery css, JQuery prop, JQuery show, JQuery length and JQuery first filter. Just standard Javascript core programming skills including variables and control structures are used so it is easy to follow. The example is built from the ground up with a mimimal starting code. This way there is no complicated starting set of code to wrap your head around before you can comfortably follow along. The steps start with the HTML, add the CSS and then the Javascript and JQuery are added.
Views: 3544 Lon Hosford
How To Create Stripe eCommerce Tiered Subscription Plans Using PHP
 
03:27
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses Learn to setup Stripe subscription plans for course project. In this section we build the plans using Stripe. Then we integrate them into our user checkout interface and web server. We are going to offer a Basic, Plus and Pro plan for subscribing to our service. We will let Stripe handle all the subscription processing for them. This will free us up from any complicated back end programming. For example Stripe will handle all the billing for the paid plans. In our case those subscribers pay us monthly. And Stripe will handle that automatically for us. We also use Stripe for tracking for our free plan members. A nice benefit is that we can add subscribers to the free plan without requiring a credit card. Our plan features should be stable over a long period of time. So we will create each plan using the Stripe Dashboard. But we also will create the same plans using the Stripe API. This is so we can quickly rebuild them during testing. For example during testing we use the nuclear option that deletes all our test data from Stripe. And yes it is a good idea to warn any team members ahead of time before doing that. We will create a data source on our web server for the subscription plan information. We will design it to map the subscription plan offerings to our content offerings. We will write functions that can retrieve the plan data. They will be limited to server side consumption. We will design it to map the subscription plan offerings to our content offerings. We will write functions that can retrieve the plan data. They will be limited to server side consumption. But we will write a script to handle network requests for the plan data. This will be our first backend service. And we also will use the plan data source in the user interface. For example dynamically generated button elements that our new subscribers will use. To complete this we will build a client side script to provide the plan data. It will work independent of the user interface. We also create our own client side network request script. It will work independent of the data needed on the client side. It handles all network service requests using HTTP POST. Then it receives JSON responses and routes the data back to the requesting script. We can rearrange this a bit to see the general architecture used for all our coding in the course. So lets take a round trip tour of that to finish up. The user interface is our view. It uses the client side plan data provider that we code in this section. The client side plan data provider manages the plan data. How it gets data is transparent to the user interface. In our case it gets its data from our web server. To do that we create a generic client side network handler. It manages all server requests and responses. We will use HTTP POST to send data and JSON for the response data. Then a server network script handles the request and responds with the plan data in the JSON format. It uses the plan data source script that we write for the server. Where this script gets the data is transparent to the network. It could be a static file or database. Well it looks like a lot to do. We will take each part separately and cover all the code. See you at the first session.
Views: 582 Lon Hosford
How to Use PHP to Charge Credit Card Using Stripe Checkout - Overview
 
02:31
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses This session looks at the data returned by the Stripe Charge create method. We look at it in the documentation, display it in in our code and take a look at it in the Strip Dashboard. All ready to start charging customers and getting paid? Well don't starting spending it just yet. We still have a wee bit more work ahead. So lets get a look at what we need to know and to build for getting paid. The Stripe Checkout form does the heavy lifting of securing a valid payment source for us. It frees us from worrying about the details of handling or validating payment cards. But it does not finalize the transaction by collecting a payment.This is because the next step in the checkout process can vary depending on your needs. However in this section we will focus on just getting paid. For you to get paid you need to write some additional PHP code. That PHP code will use the Stripe PHP library and communicate with the Stripe API. The Stripe PHP library helps minimize the coding that we need to do. When we go to collect from customers, we hopefully will get successful results. But we can get exceptions from Stripe.Those we will need to learn how to handle. So we plan to learn more about them using the online documentation.Then we will narrow that down to the coding we need for a our work. We also are going to learn more about what is going on in your Stripe dashboard. Don't worry we do not think that is a government auditor. But Stripe does record all the activity. This includes successful checkouts, charges to customers and payments to you. You can research all these records as needed. This is helpful in writing code and if customers have inquiries. To do that better we will take a look at the information available online. That helps us understand data that we will see in the dashboard reports. The Stripe dashboard is a convenient back office interface to what happens on your web site. You will find that you can make changes to transactions such as making refunds or reissuing payment notices. Finally the order information from your Stripe transactions on your website is sent to the customer's bank. We will look at what input we have to that information to avoid confusing charges on customer bank statements. Well that's it! You can get ready to go. See you at the first session.
Views: 1985 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - Introducing Tween Easing
 
03:17
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This video is background information for using the Ease class in the Tween JS library. The video convers the concept of tweening formulas and how they are applied to TweenJS animations. The CreateJS testing web page is visited for learning how to understand an easing formula works frame by frame: http://www.createjs.com/#!/TweenJS/demos/sparkTable
Views: 1704 Lon Hosford
How to Use Stripe Webpage Checkout with AJAX and PHP
 
02:19
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses In this section we are moving to a framework that lets us customize the Stripe Checkout experience. To do this we use the Stripe JS library directly with JQuery and AJAX. We rewrite our card charging script to use the AJAX data communications. A custom checkout button is demonstrated as a simple example of designing the order form independent of Stripe. All ready to get working on our next section? We are going to start using Stripe JS with AJAX. This starts our path towards customizing our Stripe based order processing. But nothing overly elaborate yet. We will start with small changes to get the basics hammered out. Stripe JS is the Javascript library used for the Stripe Checkout form. It is the checkout.js file that downloads from Stripe. We will look at how to use it with our own Javascript. Stripe JS provides options to configure the checkout form. And we can capture data from the form when it closes. And it provides an easy to use interface of methods that we can call. And we can do that with our own customized button instead of the Stripe default button. Stripe JS provides a notification when the user successfully checkouts. We can then respond using our own Javascript and libraries like JQuery. That lets us take advantage of AJAX. For example we can communicate with our server to complete the charge. We can also change the UI messaging while that occurs. For example displaying a processing message while the charge is completing. With AJAX we can create our own PHP services that use Stripe independent of our UI. This architecture is the foundation for decoupling the UI and the backend transaction processing. This architecture is the foundation for decoupling the UI and the backend transaction processing. Specifically we will be working with the POST and JSON data formats. We will send transaction information using POST. And then retrieve results using JSON. When processing completes we can update the UI with meaningful messages explaining the results. When we are done with this section you will have a basic UI framework to build more complex order processing that uses Stripe. Well that's it! You are all ready to go. See you at the first session.
Views: 1759 Lon Hosford
JQuery CSS Swapping Fadeout Images Cross Fade Animation Tutorial
 
06:02
Source files: http://bit.ly/1q9f399 See readme.txt if you want to follow along. This is the fourth step in this tutorial on how to do cross fade images using JQuery in a web page. We begin to look at the coding for rotating in the remaining images. We do that after the cross fade has ended. To detect when the cross fade has ended, we use the JQuery fadeOut method's, complete handler. The code we have completed so far used our CSS active class to select the fade out img element. Once active img element is faded out we to move the active class to the faded over img element using the JQuery addClass and removeClass methods. We also use the JQuery css method to set the z-index of the newly faded in img element. This is part of a 10 part tutorial series to learn how to cross dissolve images, also called cross fade, in a web page and at the same time learn more about using JQuery in combination with HTML, CSS and Javascript. Designed for beginners looking to learn from practical examples. The final example is reusable in other web pages. The HTML tags for the cross fade effect are designed so they would be independent of the demo web page. This way you can reuse the completed version in your other web pages and style as you like. For CSS you learn to configure the position static, position absolute, position releative and z-index properties to stack images at the same location. You will use JQuery fadeOut, JQuery next, JQuery addClass, JQuery removeClass, JQuery css, JQuery prop, JQuery show, JQuery length and JQuery first filter. Just standard Javascript core programming skills including variables and control structures are used so it is easy to follow. The example is built from the ground up with a mimimal starting code. This way there is no complicated starting set of code to wrap your head around before you can comfortably follow along. The steps start with the HTML, add the CSS and then the Javascript and JQuery are added.
Views: 2023 Lon Hosford
How to Create a Stripe PHP Subscription Service
 
06:51
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses This is an introduction to the course. It covers the goals and scope of the course, the minimum skills for a great experience in the course and a high level view of the curriculum sections. We are going to create a checkout process for a subscription service. We are going to use PHP my favorite web server programming language. And we get to use it with Stripe, a great payment processing platform for developers. Our main focus is to create a fully functional subscription signup form. It will even sport a responsive design without using any CSS frameworks. We will capture and store all the classic new member information. For example the user login details and basic profile information. We will offer three different monthly subscription plan choices. One will be a free plan. The other two are paid plans. And we take advantage of the Stripe checkout form to authorize payments. Then Stripe will automatically bill the customer monthly for us. The subscription form is integrated into a collection of core web pages. Once users subscribe to our service, we have pages for logging in and for account access. We will use a content provider subscription service as a model to follow. In our example users have access to pages of content when visiting our web site. The content on those pages is filtered based on user access and subscription plan membership. We are going to have public content and various levels of premium content. A logged out user will be limited to the public content. But we could show our logged out visitors selected premium content if we wish. For example for promotions and marketing teasers as upgrade incentives to subscribe to our paid plans. As you might expect, the logged in users would have access to the public content. But they also will be subscribed to one of our plans. And we will map our premium content to those plans. When subscribers log in they will enjoy access to their plan's content. We will cover all the details about setting up a Stripe account and using it for a subscription billing platform. To run our subscription service we will require a database. To do that we use the PHP Data Objects library and the Structure Query Language. WE will follow a client server tiered approach to our project.
Views: 4067 Lon Hosford
How to Make a SEO Friendly Web Page Title
 
10:10
Why the web page HTML title is important to SEO, how to test it, how to make one and the best practices are covered. Links to testing tools http://bit.ly/291Tx3v
Views: 282 Lon Hosford
Add User Button for JQuery Image Cross Fades
 
02:01
This is the second step for a tutorial on how to do cross fade images in a web page using JQuery. We are using the cart before the horse approach. The HTML is the horse. In this simple HTML page we set it up so the internet "sees" a well structured cart. We do not care how the HTML fits JQuery or the human visitor. When we do that, then the behaviour code, your Javascript and associated libraries like JQuery can be loaded last. Or you are hitching the horses to a great cart. Source files: http://bit.ly/1q9f399 See readme.txt if you want to follow along. In this step we add an interaction button and JQuery. We use the button to sequentially cycle through the image cross fades. We will install JQuery from the CDN. Then add the button along with the Javascript code to handle the JQuery click event. This is part of a 10 part tutorial series to learn how to cross dissolve images, also called cross fade, in a web page and at the same time learn more about using JQuery in combination with HTML, CSS and Javascript. Designed for beginners looking to learn from practical examples. The final example is reusable in other web pages. The HTML tags for the cross fade effect are designed so they would be independent of the demo web page. This way you can reuse the completed version in your other web pages and style as you like. For CSS you learn to configure the position static, position absolute, position releative and z-index properties to stack images at the same location. You will use JQuery fadeOut, JQuery next, JQuery addClass, JQuery removeClass, JQuery css, JQuery prop, JQuery show, JQuery length and JQuery first filter. Just standard Javascript core programming skills including variables and control structures are used so it is easy to follow. The example is built from the ground up with a mimimal starting code. This way there is no complicated starting set of code to wrap your head around before you can comfortably follow along. The steps start with the HTML, add the CSS and then the Javascript and JQuery are added. Subscriber message: This is the second step for a tutorial on how to do cross fade images in a web page using JQuery. In this step we add an interaction button. We use it to sequentially cycle through the image cross fades. We will install JQuery from the CDN. Then add the button along with the Javascript code to handle the JQuery click event.
Views: 512 Lon Hosford
How to Use PHP for Stripe Simple Embedded Checkout Form UI - Overview
 
03:01
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses These are the topics covered for the Stripe Checkout form. We are creating and using the Stripe Embedded Checkout form. We use its Remember Me feature. The Stripe Checkout form parameters and its impact on the DOM are investigated. We also look at the network data requests made by the checkout form. A PDF version of the video is included in the additional resources for this lecture. Are you ready to dig into the Stripe Embedded Checkout user interface? Well guys it not going to be that big of a project to do. Mostly we need to understand what is already done for us by Stripe. This involves a single line of HTML that lets Stripe handle most of your checkout work. It renders a checkout form that handles all the payment authorization steps. You will integrate the form into a single item order web page. Then you practice processing orders to get the same experience as your customers will get. To do this you learn how to test the checkout process on your web site using testing data. This includes taking a ride to Stripe to investigate the testing data available to use for credit cards and other payment situations. We also learn about the Stripe tokens. Stripe tokens free you from handling the secure banking data of your customers. Both you and customers will be very happy about that. As you test, you will track the Stripe token that is created along with other checkout data. We will learn how to use the token in a future section of the course to get automatic payments. We also are going to work with the Stripe "Remember me" feature. This allows customers to store their payment data for use when visiting your web site. We go through the entire process just as your customer might experience. You will have a bit of fun role playing as one of your "Remember me" customers. This includes tracking the "Remember Me" text messages on your own phone sent during the process. Yes it does look like a lot. But it is really one simple screen with the various verification processing messages. When you are done you will have experienced an important benefit to you and your customers. And that benefit is Stripe pre-filling payment information on your web site for future orders. This makes it quick and more certain that customers complete the next order. We also go behind the scenes as the Stripe checkout form communicates with the Stripe API on its servers. Stripe has a number of networks requests that you can learn about.They have interesting response data that we will explore using the web browser tools. We also will investigate what Stripe downloads to your page for example HTML elements and form assets such credit card images. Finally we go on an outing to locate transaction data in the Stripe dashboard logs. Stripe logs a transaction when a customer completes a checkout form on your web site. Well that's it! You can get ready to go. See you then for the first session.
Views: 2687 Lon Hosford
How to Delay to an Action Sequence in Cocos2d 2.0 Tutorial
 
05:52
Demonstrates how to delay action sequence actions using multiple CCTimeDelay objects in Cocos2d Tutorial web page http://www.lonhosford.com/cocos2d-v2-create-an-action-sequence-tutorial/ contains more information and downloads. Intended audience is new to Cocos2d and has fundamental knowledge of xCode and Objective C. Ideally you are looking for kickstart atomic examples for the basic concepts.
Views: 993 Lon Hosford
How to Move a Sprite in Cocos2d Tutorial
 
02:40
This is a demonstration of how to move an image file as a sprite between two points in a Cocos2d Version 2.0 xCode project. Tutorial web page http://www.lonhosford.com/cocos2d-v2-move-a-sprite-tutorial contains more information and downloads. Intended audience is new to Cocos2d and has fundamental knowledge of xCode and Objective C. Ideally you are looking for kickstart atomic examples for the basic concepts. More Cocos2d Ice Breaker Tutorials: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2787204FFE36BB9E
Views: 3464 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - How to Change and Test Frame Rates
 
03:40
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW
Views: 1798 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - How To Add a Delay In A Tween
 
01:50
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW In this lesson we modify a Tween to include a delay during the animation.
Views: 1717 Lon Hosford
How to Create a Subscription Service with Stripe and PHP
 
01:46
Visit course website: http://bit.ly/stripe-checkout-php-combo-courses Do you want to build an online subscription service? Well if you like PHP this is the course for you. Hi, my name is Lon Hosford. I am a big fan of PHP and like building web apps with it. And so does Pseudo (sudo), my assistant code engineer. And oh yes Pseudo has some interesting team members that will join in the fun. In this course you work on the core functionality of a content subscription service. You learn how to use the Stripe payment platform. It is free and easy to use with PHP. You will build a fully functional signup form that handles multiple subscription plans. With it you are able to register free plan subscribers and track them using Stripe. And chargeable plans that Stripe will handle the recurring payments automatically for you. To authorize payments you will integrate the very convenient Stripe checkout form that works across all devices. I designed this course for web developers who want to work with these technologies. All you need is some light to regular exposure and you are good to go. I have dug into many software technologies during my career. I seriously enjoy helping you learn to use them. And I love to share how to apply what you learn as a hands on developer and a team leader from working on projects for great clients. If you only need the basics of using Stripe with PHP, I also have this companion course that you might like. Please feel free to look through description for this course. And take advantage of all the open lectures. And we do look forward to you joining us today.
Views: 1822 Lon Hosford
Understanding Server Side Web Development 2013 Q4 Session 1
 
01:19:22
Raw unedited recording of live session of course on server side web development. Download course files and register free for future sessions. http://www.lonhosford.com/courses/build-dynamic-web-pages-icebreaker-beginners/ The course is designed for those new to HTML, CSS and Javascript but have some basic training and experience. You wish to learn about dynamic web sites using PHP and SQL. You have access to a PHP enabled web server or are willing to install a free local web server on your computer. During the course we will learn by example building forms that gather data from the user and return dynamic results.
Views: 332 Lon Hosford
Geology Lecture Part 1
 
02:01
Fiery Furnace hike Arches National Park geology lecture at Natural Arch
Views: 6413 Lon Hosford
How to Add a Sprite in Cocos2d Tutorial - Notes for Mastery
 
03:32
Tutorial web page http://www.lonhosford.com/cocos2d-v2-add-a-sprite-tutorial contains more information and downloads. This links the Cocos2d Version 2.0 and related documentation to the steps of adding an image file as a sprite to a Cocos2d xCode Project. Intended audience is new to Cocos2d and has fundamental knowledge of xCode and Objective C. Ideally you are looking for kickstart atomic examples for the basic concepts.
Views: 176 Lon Hosford
JQuery CSS Using FadeOut Method for Cross Fade Animation Tutorial
 
03:24
Source files: http://bit.ly/1q9f399 Stacking the Pancakes Yum! Using the JQuery fadeOut method is all about stacking the images. This is the third step for a tutorial on how to do cross fade images in a web page using JQuery. In this step we learn how to set up two images for using the JQuery fadeOut method. This requires using the JQuery css and next methods. The JQuery css method allows us to control the z-index property to assure the images are in the correct layering order. The JQuery next method allows us to choose the sibling of the fade out image.
Views: 419 Lon Hosford
How to Change a Sprite's Opacity Cocos2d Tutorial
 
08:59
This is a demonstration of 4 ways to change a sprite's opacity in a Cocos2d Version 2.0 xCode project. Tutorial web page http://www.lonhosford.com/cocos2d/cocos2d-v2-change-sprite-opacity-tutorial contains more information and downloads. Intended audience is new to Cocos2d and has fundamental knowledge of xCode and Objective C. Ideally you are looking for kickstart atomic examples for the basic concepts. More Cocos2d Ice Breaker Tutorials: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2787204FFE36BB9E
Views: 888 Lon Hosford
Wordpress Session 1 Introduction
 
12:25
This is a live webinar recording of Understanding using Wordpress. Both WordPress.org self hosting and WordPress.com are covered. Word press is a content management system design for everyday folks like you to build fully featured blog and web site sites for any purpose. That includes the tasks of all the web site administration tasks. Topics Blogging only vs Website with blogging. Managed vs Self Managed WordPress Hosting. Manual installation on Your Own Web server. The WordPress Dashboard. User Accounts. What you need and what you don't. Adding and Maintaining Blog Posts. Adding and Maintaining Web Pages. Uploading Graphics. Including Links. How Layout and Design Is Handled with Themes. The Essential WordPress Plugins. Basic SEO Tools such as Analytics. How to Get Free Plugins and Themes. How monetizing (making money) works. What technical knowledge you need. Site security and backup. Where to get support.
Views: 536 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - The HTML Practice File
 
02:26
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This lesson examines the base HTML, CSS and Javascript in the practice files for this series on basic animation using Create JS.
Views: 3465 Lon Hosford
How To Create an Action Sequence in Cocos2d Tutorial
 
05:52
Tutorial web page http://www.lonhosford.com/cocos2d-v2-create-an-action-sequence-tutorial contains more information and downloads. This is a demonstration of how to create a sprite action sequence Cocos2d Version 2.0 xCode project. Intended audience is new to Cocos2d and has fundamental knowledge of xCode and Objective C. Ideally you are looking for kickstart atomic examples for the basic concepts.
Views: 538 Lon Hosford
CreateJS - Introducing The EaselJS Library
 
03:42
32 lessons with example file downloads http://bit.ly/28Kt5gW This lesson is background information for using Easel JS to draw on the HTML5 canvas element.
Views: 2973 Lon Hosford
Understanding Server Side Web Development 2013 Q4 Session 2
 
01:40:55
Download course files and register free for future sessions. http://www.lonhosford.com/courses/build-dynamic-web-pages-icebreaker-beginners/ Covered basic PHP expressions variables and variable functions for strings, numbers, indexed arrays, associative arrays and super global variables. Send and received form and url data using the $_GET, $_POST and $_REQUEST super global variables. Introduced the $_SESSION variable. The course is designed for those new to HTML, CSS and Javascript but have some basic training and experience. You wish to learn about dynamic web sites using PHP and SQL. You have access to a PHP enabled web server or are willing to install a free local web server on your computer. During the course we will learn by example building forms that gather data from the user and return dynamic results.
Views: 123 Lon Hosford

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