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Hops: How to harvest, process, and store hops
 
07:59
I'm happy - or should I say I'm hoppy! It's time to harvest hops! In this video, I cover some on how to grow hops, I show how I harvest hops, and then I show how I process hops to use later for brewing beer, and, believe it or not, for cooking. Let's hop back in time to this past spring. Every year, I clean out the area where my hops grow and I promise them that I will build them something to let them reach their full potential of getting 25 feet high. But every year, I end up letting my poor hops fend for themselves and they have to make do with growing on a 6-7 foot trellis. But my hops are enthusiastic and they make out OK all on their own. As the summer comes to an end, I check on their flowers. Hop flowers look like little pine cones, and are even called hop cones, but they are flowers. If the flowers are green and tight like this, I leave them alone. But when they become light, dry, papery and spring back when compressed, then they are ready. But it's not the cone or flower that I'm really after -- it's the oils and resins hidden with the flower. So then I need to hop to it and get to picking! Some folks are adamant that it's better to pick hops too early than too later. But other folks have had fine results using even the brown hops as long as the resin is yellow and smells good. Hops have scratchy hairs on their vines and some people are really sensitive to that. I wear long sleeves to keep from getting all cut up by the vines. I use my camping cookpot tied to a cord and hang that from my neck to make picking efficient. It helps to understand how hop flowers are attached to the vine -- technically called a bine because it doesn't have tendrils or thorns, but climbs by constricting around its support like a boa constrictor. This would be a lot harder to pick if my hop vines were 25 feet tall. But then I would just cut them down and pick at my leisure in the shade. But with my short hops, I can pick easily. So I guess there is a bonus for being haphazard! Picking hops is great for learning to NOT eat what's getting picked. Hops are so bitter! They make even bitter dandelions seem sweet by comparison! I love the sound of hops falling into the basket. And now it's time to process the hops for storing them. This part can't wait, so I have got to hop on it! The goal in storing hops is to keep those oils and resins stable. The enemies are heat and oxidation. The first step is to get the hops cones dry! I put my hops cones on big trays to dry. But that was only because we had some cool, dry weather. This air drying wasn't quite enough to dry the hop cones down all the way. So I had Klutzy Gardener help transfer the hop cones to some dehydrator trays. You can see the cones have opened up and are dropping some of that all-important resin. Now, commercial hop dryers may go up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit, but I keep my dehydrators set to about 105 degrees Fahrenheit and let them go for a day or two. How do I know when they are done? The center stem of the hop cone should be brittle and break apart when it's bent, and the hop cones should be crispy and stay crushed when they are compressed. I better get hopping and get these hops in the freezer. That's right, the freezer! If these hops were vacuum packed and put in the freezer, they would keep great for 18 months. But I don't want to use plastic and I'll be using all my hops by springtime. So I'm storing my hops in these canning jars and putting the jars in the freezer. I need to get as much air as I can out of the jars. I don't want to vacuum pack the hops with the heat of a canner. Commercial hop operations compress their dried hops into big bales. I just compress my hops directly into the jar. The more hops I get in the jar, the less air can be in there. I use a cutout circle from a yogurt or cottage cheese lid to compress my hops down into the jar. The hop resin makes this a sticky business! All the dehydrator trays and other tools have to be washed well before they get used for processing other food. I'll be using my hops for a bunch of different things -- certainly, as a dual use, whole leaf hops to provide the bittering and aromatic components of some home-brewed beer! But I'll also be making Hop Tea, Hop Chocolate, and I'll be cooking with hops, too. If you're subscribed to my channel, you'll be sure to see all those upcoming videos. With a scientific name like Humulus lupulus, how can anyone NOT want to try hops in some way? I'd love to hear what you think of hops! I hope things are going well at your place. And I sure appreciate you watching this video and my channel! Hops: Humulus lupulus (Family Cannabaceae) Check out my new blog channel on Steemit! http://steemit.com/@haphazard-hstead My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 59006 Haphazard Homestead
Picking and eating lambs quarter: with the only recipe you need
 
04:06
In my view, lambs quarter is, hands down, the number 1 weed to eat, from the garden or out in the wild. In this video, I'm headed out to pick lambs quarter from the homestead, then I'm going to cook some up using the only recipe that anyone needs to know to make lambs quarter delicious. Lambs quarter shows up in disturbed soils in the late psring and early summer. It's so easy to pick at a young stage. I just pull the whole weed out of the ground and tear off the roots. That's it. But I don't always pull up the whole lambs quarter plant. When the plant is older, I pinch the growing tips out and just use them, rather than the whole plant. One advantage to pinching those tips is that the lambs quarter branches out and I can come back to the same place and pick them again, over and over. The growing tips of lambs quarter don't snap off, but are easy to pinch off. I pinch them off with my thumb and index finger. Two distinctive features of lambs quarter are its triangular leaves and the white residue on its growing tips. It gives the younger leaves kind of a slick feel. The white residue feels gritty and wet at the same time. It rubs off easily and is a distinctive feature of lambs quarter. It is part of the lambs quarter plant and does not mean there is something wrong with the plant. It is a hydrophobic coating that sheds water. It's so easy to cook lambs quarter. I rinse my collected lambs quarter to get off any dirt or insects. The white residue is hydrophobic and helps to keep the lambs quarter from getting wet. Some of it does wash off into the rinse water, but it does not need to be washed off. It is part of the lambs quarter plant. This entire batch took less than 3 1/2 minutes from start to finish. I just put it into a pan with the water that clings to its leaves, and stir it around over the heat. Sometimes i add a little more water, but nothing else. It cooks down so fast and smells so good. When it's done, I just add some nice salt when I'm ready to eat it and that's it. So that's the only recipe that anyone needs to know to really enjoy lambs quarter. Otherwise, lambs quarter can be used exactly like spinach or swiss chard. But it is too tasty of a weed to want to hide its great flavor. Lambs quarter, Chenopodium album, Family Chenopodiaceae (the goosefoot family) Here's my playlist on foraging wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW Here's my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/HChrisH200 Thanks for watching!
Views: 19435 Haphazard Homestead
How to Harvest Pine Pollen
 
04:24
"Did you ever eat a pine tree? Some parts are edible." That's what world-famous wild foods forager Euell Gibbons used to say. This video is about how to gather what I think is the tastiest part of pine trees -- the pine pollen! Pine trees put out an incredible amount of pine pollen in the spring. When it looks like yellow ash or scum is floating on the ponds and lakes, that's the time to get to harvesting pine pollen. Any real pine tree is edible and tasty. A real pine tree has a scientific name that starts with the word "Pinus". Real pine trees have some sort of sheath at the base of their needles. And all the pines, except one, have 2-6 needles bunched together in that sheath. Here at Haphazard Homestead, we have the 3-needled Ponderosa Pine, the 5-needled Sugar Pine, and the 5-needled Eastern White Pine. To get the pine pollen, we're looking for pine cones, but not the big woody pine cones. Those are the female cones that have the pine tree seeds. We are looking for the male cones that have the pollen. It's easy to tell when the male pollen cones are ready to harvest. I give them a tap and look for the pollen to puff out. Then I just twist the little cones and they pop right off. Pine trees have lots and lots of male cones and pollen, so taking some doesn't hurt anything. Not every little pollen cone will be at the same maturity. If some haven't opened up very much, I just lay them on a tray in a warm spot out of the wind. These cones are fully opened and almost done for the season. But there's still pollen left in them. To separate the pollen from the cones, I think the easiest way is to put the cones in a jar or large paper sack and shake that pollen out! Shaking makes little brown bits of the cones come off, so these need to be sifted out, even though a few don't hurt anything in using the pollen. If you want to play gold miner and pan for the golden pollen, go right ahead - but I think it's easier to just use a finer sifter. The best that I have found is the tiny mesh of these contraptions for making tea. The pollen is tiny, as fine as dust. It sticks to everything. So I have a dedicated paintbrush that I use to sweep up the last of that valuable golden dust. Every pollen is a little different and some stays fresh better than others. The pollen tends to get bitter or even rancid as it ages. A good way to keep pollen in good condition beyond a few weeks is to freeze it. Pollen is great mixed with flour in all kinds of baking. I used all mine this year making batch after batch of pine pollen and spruce tree cookies -- they were so good! You can check out my video on those cookies. Well, I hope you get a chance to enjoy some pine pollen come springtime. I hope things are going well at your place. I'd love to hear your thoughts on using pine pollen. Pine trees: Genus Pinus, Pine family (Pinaceae) My video on how to make pine pollen and spruce tree cookies: https://youtu.be/N5yVbJirP4U My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "River Valley Breakdown" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Photo: Pine pollen on lake: photo Brian Stansberry, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Center-hill-lake-pollen-tn1.jpg Used under CC-BY-3.0, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 45818 Haphazard Homestead
Elderberry Flowers: How to pick and use elder flowers
 
04:07
Whether you call them elderberry flowers, elder flowers, or elder blow, they all are great to eat! In this video, I go into some details about how to identify this great plant. I also give tips on how to pick the best flowers, and I'll show how to get the flowers ready to use -- both fresh and dried. This video applies to the Common Elderberry of the eastern United States, the blue elder of the western US, and the black elderberry of Europe because that are so closely related that they were recently combined into the same species. The elderberry grows as a bush, usually wth multiple stems. It can be a big bush. Look at Klutzy Gardener over on the right, and he's 6 foot, 3 inches tall! Here's the flowerhead attached to the end of a branch. And look how these leaves come out opposite each other on the branch. Each leaf has 5-11 leaflets with jagged edges. As they get older, the elderberry branches get woody and their bark has distinctive bumps. Elderberry branches are not solid wood. They have a spongy pith in the center. The elderberry flowerhead is gorgeous. It's very flat. It does not have a conical shape - it's flat! Here's how the flowerhead grows: the flowerstems branch out in a whorl, with each stem branching out again into another whorl, and so on. A close look at the flowerhead shows it is made of lots and lots of individual flowers. The flavor of the elderberry flowers does not come from the petals or nectar - it comes from the flowers' pollen! So it's important to harvest the flowerheads at the stage when the pollen is fresh, not before the flowerbuds open up and not after the pollen is gone. Both in the wild and in a cultivated landscape, an elderberry bush is dramatic! Every year, people stop and ask me what this bush is! I do want to emphasize that even though the biggest flowerheads may have multiple levels to them, each level is flat and it's not arranged in a cone shape -- that's a different plant! Here's a flowerhead that's too immature to bother with - the buds haven't opened up yet. Here's a flowerhead with some flowers already getting old. The best thing to do in this case is just harvest the part of the flowerhead that's at the right stage. Even though elderberry flowers are little, it really doesn't take long to collect enough flowerheads to use for a bunch of different things. I like to use a lot of flowers fresh. But the green parts of elderberry plants are not good for anybody to eat, so I rub the flowers off the flowerhead. I do get a little bit of the green stems in there, but not enough to worry about. I also try to make sure the bugs and spiders escape. I also set some flowerheads aside to dry in a dark place like a paper sack. But I just left these in a bowl. When the flowerheads are dry, it's easier to rub off the flowers. Then I put the dried flowers in a jar so I can use them later in the year for elder flower tea, which is really good! I'll post a video soon about making tea with from dried and fresh elderberry flowers. And I'll be posting a video on how to make some great elder flower pancakes, too. Elderberry: Sambucus nigra, Family Adoxaceae Common Elderberry: Sambucus nigra subspp. candadensis Blue Elder: Sambucus nigra subspp. cerulea Black Elderberry: Sambucus nigra My video on picking and using elderberry flowers: https://youtu.be/TiaTrbVcDB0 My playlist on foraging wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My playlist on homestead cooking: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAOiHxDZ-kYltFC4L9DPafT My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 14453 Haphazard Homestead
How to eat a spruce tree: picking and using spruce tips
 
05:01
In this video, I cover how to identify spruce trees, give some tips on picking spruce tips -- the new spring growth -- and then show a few ways that I have been eating spruce trees. What I cover works for all kinds of spruce. Spruce trees are evergreen conifers. The most reliable way to identify a spruce is to look at the needles on a branch. Each needle comes out of the branch alone, by itself, not in a group. And each needle has a stalk, a little stump, a peg, which is the distinguishing feature of a spruce. White spruce, red spruce, black spruce, blue spruce, Norway spruce, Sitka spruce, and Engelmann spruce are the kind you are most likely to see. In the spring, when the new growth starts to come out, is a great time to get food from the spruce tree. The new growth is easy to identify because it is brighter in color and the needles are soft. Picking spruce tips from a standing tree is a good exercise in self-control and judgement. Every tip that's picked is pruning the tree. That tip will not grow back. So don't pick too many spruce tips from one branch. And focus on the tips that will ultimately be shaded and die back anyway - that means the tips in the interior of the tree and the tips close to the ground. I needed to prune my spruce trees anyway, so I could harvest a lot of spruce tips. Every kind of spruce tree has a little different flavor. The Colorado Blue Spruce has a really nice flavor. But they are really prickly. Be careful not to get the mature needles in your picking, because they can be as stiff and hazardous as fish bones. Spruce trees will have their new tips at different stages of growth, so there's a lot of selection. The tiniest tips have the mildest flavor. In our regular food, we don't encounter the spruce's resin flavor, so it can seem strong and strange. If you don't like strongly flavored foods like highly hopped beer, strong coffee, or dark chocolate, you may not like the taste of spruce. The resin flavor of the new growth of spruce tees will taste the strongest straight off the tree. When the tips are soaked in water or other liquids, the resin flavor takes as step back and the citrus flavors step forward. Once the spruce tips sit in the water a few hours, the water tastes incredible -- it's like drinking the forest. Watch my video on how to use that spruce water to make some great spruce tree sorbet: https://youtu.be/WfdFwr7mg6g The chopped up spruce tips are great in a simple shortbread recipe - that would work really well for camping because it's good even without cooking! The chopped up spruce tips also make a great version of balsamic vinegar with only 3 other ingredients that are probably in your house. I'll also be posting a video on how I use the spruce tips to make some really good cookies. I hope you get a chance to enjoy something from the spruce tree smorgasboard! I'd love to hear what you think about eating psruce trees! Spruce: Picea genus, Family Pinaceae (Pine family) White spruce: Picea glauca Red spruce: Picea rubens Black spruce: Picea mariana Blue spruce, also known as Colorado Blue Spruce: Picea pungens Norway spruce: Picea abies Sitka spruce: Picea sitchensis Engelmann spruce: Picea engelmanni, Pine family (Pineaceae) My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Thanks for watching!
Views: 13568 Haphazard Homestead
Elephant Garlic Scapes: picking, freezing, impact on garlic harvest
 
02:44
This is the second video in a series about the seven, yes, 7 different products that you can harvest from elephant garlic. This video is about elephant garlic scapes -- the flower stalks. Stick around to the end and I'll also show you what effect picking the scapes has on the final size of the elephant garlic bulbs, too. "Scape" is just a fancy name for a leafless flower stalk that comes directly from plant's root. Elephant garlic scapes are different than the scapes of other garlic, which start looping around in a circle. If you wait for elephant garlic scapes to do that, you will wait forever! An elephant garlic scape can get 5 or 6 feet tall! Don't wait that long Get those elephant garlic scapes while they are short, so there's no plant energy wasted on growing that tall flower stalk. Elephant garlic scapes are so easy to harvest! How easy? Well, I had to leave town right as the scapes were coming up. Even though they keep in the refrigerator a couple weeks, I left Klutzy Gardener with instructions to pick the rest of the scapes and put them in the freezer. You can see it's not hard. But you can also watch the video and hear Klutzy Gardener's perspective. In answer to his question, you simply put the chopped scapes and small flowerheads in the freezer, without any blanching. Here's what's great about elephant garlic scapes. You get a summertime harvest to eat -- and the removal of the scapes increases the size of your elephant garlic bulbs, too. here are some heads of elephant garlic that came from the same patch. Can you tell which ones had their scapes cut off? Well, I hope things are going well at your place. I'd love to hear how you use elephant garlic scapes -- so leave a comment! Subscribe so you don't miss out on the 5 future videos on more things you can harvest from elephant garlic! Elephant garlic harvest #1: Spring Leeks -- https://youtu.be/m1A_vj3F2pY Mulching elephant garlic with leaves -- https://youtu.be/-iwT_PQgBCg My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA The curly garlic scape photos are by Rebecca Slegel and used under a Creative commons 2.0 – Attribution license. No changes were made to the two photos. Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/grongar/3705185024/in/photostream/ Creative Commons license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Views: 9984 Haphazard Homestead
Fruit Trees: Mulching with Cardboard and Wood Chips
 
03:09
I needed to put mulch on some of my apple and pear trees. I mulch my fruit trees for several reasons: (1) to reduce competition for water, especially by grass, (2) to keep the soil temperatures cooler and more consistent over the summer, which are preferred by apple and pear tress, reducing the trees' water demand, and (3) to keep weed trimmers and lawn mowers away from the tree trunk. (Note: Klutzy Gardener is great for a lot of things, and gets a lot done, but he works in the woods and is more used to pushing through the brush than being delicate around fruit trees or garden plants. It's just what foresters do.) I mulch in the late winter and early spring, before the grass has started to stress the trees, and before my well-drained soils have a chance to dry out. I start by laying wet cardboard under the tree branches. I go out 2-3 feet from the trunk, but leave a few inches uncovered near the trunk to prevent mulch from piling up there, holding moisture against the trunk and encouraging weakening and rotting of the bark. I don't use glossy cardboard. And in my climate (in Oregon's Willamette Valley in the western US) and on my Class 1 soil, the cardboard doesn't last long or impede air circulation in the root zone to any extent; instead, the worms will break down the cardboard, as long as it stays covered by my mulch material. I use wood chips to cover the cardboard to a depth of 4.5 to 6 inches, following the recommendations of the Home Orchard Society. I don't let the mulch lay up against the tree trunks. I like wood chips because I can get them for free, they last for 2-3 years, and don't have a lot of Nitrogen (my trees are more liable to put on too much vegetative growth than not enough). Further, because wood chips are broken down by fungus, there will be a lot of mycelium in the root zone, improving the soil's structure and water retention, and making the soil more like the forest environment where apples and pears originated. For more information on using cardboard as a mulch under-layer, check out this link from the National Center for Appropriate Technology: https://attra.ncat.org/calendar/question.php/can-i-use-cardboard-and-newspaper-as-mulch-on-my-organic-farm Music: "Meatball Parade" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 9328 Haphazard Homestead
How to make Balsamic Vinegar from Spruce Trees
 
04:04
I'm not fancy, but I've got a confession. I really like balsamic vinegar! Fifty bucks a bottle is too steep, but the grocery store vinaigrette just doesn't cut it. So what's a person to do? I say -- Hey, start picking from my spruce trees! In this video, I show how I make some great balsamic vinegar from my spruce trees and I show some ways that I'm using my spruce tree balsamic vinegar to get the most out the the spruce flavor. Is this spruce tree balsamic vinegar any good? Well, I entered it into my county fair and got a blue ribbon. The judges said it was "Delicious!". The spruce tree balsamic vinegar is really easy to make. It uses the new spring growth of any spruce tree. To find out more about identifying and picking spruce, check out my earlier video in the link below. The resin in the spruce needles substitutes for the flavors from the wooden barrels used to make traditional balsamic vinegar. I chopped up 2 cups of the spruce tips and put them into a jar. Then I covered the spruce tips with 2 cups of apple cider vinegar. I added 10 peppercorns and 2 Tablespoons of honey. That's it: 2 c. spruce tips, 2 c. apple cider vinegar, 10 peppercorns, and 2 T. honey. Then in closed the jar, turned in a few times. I kept it in the dark and turned the jar every few days. By the time it got to the county fair, my spruce tree balsamic vinegar had aged about 3 months. How am I using the spruce tree balsamic vinegar? Just like any balsamic vinegar, with a nice olive oil. But there's a bonus, too. The marinated spruce tips are great on their own, for example, chopped up and used to top some nice cheese. I also use them to marinate some homegrown vegetables, like heritage tomatoes, sweet onions, and bell peppers. And apples grilled with the marinated spruce tips and the spruce tree balsamic vinegar are so good that I'll be doing a separate video on that! Now, balsamic vinegar purists may note that real balsamic vinegar is made with grape juice and not apple cider vinegar. Well, next year I will be adding some home canned grape juice to the recipe, so stay tuned. Or you try it and let me know how it turns out! Hope things are going well and your place. Thanks for watching! Spruce trees: Genus Picea, Pine family (Pineaceae) My video on foraging spruce trees' new spring growth: https://youtu.be/CF97dTQIQqY My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: Jazz Piano Bar. Doug Maxwell, Media Right Productions. from the free YouTube Audio Library. Adapted photos: 1. Balsamic vinegar: photo by jules https://www.flickr.com/photos/stone-soup/4852551270 Used under CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ 2. Kraft dressing: photo by Mike Mozart https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/15174997476 Used under CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Views: 4104 Haphazard Homestead
How to Eat Sunflower Buds as Artichoke Hearts
 
04:22
Artichokes are great to eat, especially artichoke hearts. But artichokes don't grow easily everywhere. Even here at Haphazard Homestead, where they pretty much take care of themselves, the artichoke season can be short. In this video, I show how to get all the artichoke hearts you want -- by growing sunflowers. Yes, sunflowers! This works whether you grow Giant Sunflowers, fancy sunflowers, or black oil sunflowers. Here's how: Step 1: Just go out to your sunflower patch and look for flower buds, and pull them off! I know, it seems so wrong to pull the head off a sunflower. But they are easy to grow and you can plant a lot of them. Or use a variety that produces lots of flowers instead of one big head. Step 2: Take the sunflower buds into the kitchen. Here you can see the range of maturity of the buds that work like artichoke hearts. The buds showing their flowers have a little bit of a pine flavor that the younger buds don't have. You can also see here how the buds already look a lot like artichoke hearts, without all the artichoke leaves around them. But it's amazing how similar they taste, too! To cook the sunflower buds, just blanch them in boiling water for 3 minutes. Then drain. And then cook in a second pot of boiling water until they are tender. Buds this size were almost tender enough after the first 3 minutes, so it only took about 3 more minutes to get them completely tender -- where a knife foes through the bud really easily without much resistance. Then, just like with an artichoke, let them cook or rinse them in cold water, until you can handle them easily. Now, just trim off the back of the bud and get the bigger green leaves off the bud, until it looks like an artichoke heart. For the trimming, sometimes I use a knife. On the smaller buds, I think kitchen scissors make the trimming a little easier. This looks messy, but trimming an artichoke is messy, too! At this point, you can use the sunflower buds however you like to prepare artichoke hearts. I'm sure you can make something fancier than me! : ) So how do they taste? Well, the other day for dinner, I just sauteed them with some Walla Walla sweet onions from the garden, and here' how it went --- The sunflower buds are really good! They have a little smokiness. The bigger ones have a little piney flavor to them. I hope you get a chance to try sunflower buds as a substitute for artichoke hearts. I think you'll be pretty happy with how good they are! If you save seeds from the sunflower heads that you don't pick and eat, then you can harvest a lot of sunflower buds the next year. I'd like to know how you would prepare sunflower buds if you used them like artichoke hearts! I hope things are going well at your place. If you enjoyed this video, please feel free to share it. My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Photo: Cooked artichoke heart by DocteurCosmos: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cooked_artichoke_heart.jpg Used under CC BY 3.0 Unported: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Music: "Enchanted Valley" and "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 5089 Haphazard Homestead
How to use elephant garlic as spring leeks
 
03:10
One of the ways I am able to thrive living here on my haphazard homestead is, when something grows well here, whether it's wild or cultivated, I try to make the most of it -- I try to use it a lot! A good example of this is elephant garlic. You may be familiar with elephant garlic and it's big cloves used in cooking. But what if I told you that there are six more products you can harvest from elephant garlic? This video is the first in a series about all seven things you can harvest from elephant garlic. In this video, I'm going to show how I use elephant garlic as a spring leek. Elephant garlic are more closely related to leeks than to other kinds of garlic. In some parts of my yard, elephant garlic reseeds itself and grows naturally, on its own, in a pretty haphazard way. I let these independent plants do their thing, and over the years they grow into big clumps. These clumps are no good for garlic, because there's no room for the bulbs to expand. But in the late spring, when the plants have achieved their full size, I dig them up to use as a leek. In this case, I got Klutzy Gardener to dig them up. Here are some elephant garlic that I dug up earlier on my own. At this stage, they are really tender and cut easily. They look like a leek and can be used like a leek, whether it's the bottom stalk or the leafy tops. Her are the elephant garlic from Klutzy gardener's project. There were a lot in that big clump that he dug up. I use these elephant garlic spring leeks like any leek. I also like to dehydrate them and will be posting a video about that pretty soon. So there you go. That's the first of seven different harvests from elephant garlic. I hope things are going well at your place. If you are new to my channel, I'd love to have you subscribe so you can find out about the six other elephant garlic harvests. Thanks for watching! My video on using leaves to mulch elephant garlic: https://youtu.be/-iwT_PQgBCg My playlist on garden topics: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My YouTube channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Hustle" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 5504 Haphazard Homestead
Use elephant garlic as low-cost Giant Allium in your flower garden
 
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Welcome to the third in a 7-part series about different products provided by elephant garlic. This video focuses on elephant garlic flowers. After this video, I hope that you will consider elephant garlic as an inexpensive way to have a dramatic impact in your flower gardens. Have you seen the gigantic allium in the fall bulb catalogs? They always look so nice, but are so dadgum expensive! Here are 2 examples. Look at Mt. Everest, a very pretty, white gigantic allium. It has 4-inch flowerheads, grown 3 feet tall, and you can buy them for 3 for $17.95. I have seen them online for $11.99 each! Then there's the Allium Ambassador, a beautiful purple gigantic allium. It has 6-inch flowerheads, grows 3-4 feet tall, and you can get 3 for $29.95 and that's without shipping! Elephant garlic are gigantic alliums, too. They are not like regular garlic that has little bulblets in their flowers. No! Elephant garlic has big beautiful flowers that transition into big seedheads that last a long time and provide some real interest in a flower garden even into winter. How big are elephant garlic flowers? Well, I went out and measured a few of the dried flowerheads of elephant garlic that were growing untended, without any help, here at Haphazard Homestead. Here are some elephant garlic flowerheads going to seed that are 4-5 inches across, and are easily 5 feet tall. Here's another elephant garlic flowerstalk that's almost 6 feet tall. And here's a flowerhead that was easily 5 inches across. Elephant garlic flowers and their seedheads make great cut flowers to use in an arrangement, fresh or dried. Let's take a look at a couple other attributes of elephant garlic flowers. Bees love them! You can eat the flowers, too. I think they have the hottest, most intense flavor of all the parts of the elephant garlic, so I don't use a lot of them at any one time. Did I tell you that bees love these flowers? Bees love the elephant garlic flowers! When elephant garlic flowers like this, the bulbs down below don't get very big. You can see my video on elephant garlic scapes for more about that. So how can you have your cake and eat it, too -- or in this case, how can you have elephant garlic flowers and harvest more to eat? Here's my suggestion: Each elephant garlic that is left in the ground will divide into a clump the next year, that will flower, too. You can dig up some of the clumps and use them as spring leeks. You can check an earlier video in this elephant garlic series for more about that. Well, I hope I have convinced you that elephant garlic can provide some beautiful flowers that are worth as much as the expensive gigantic alliums that you see in the fall bulb catalogs. My video on using elephant garlic as spring leeks: https://youtu.be/m1A_vj3F2pY My video on elephant garlic scapes and their impact on the garlic bulb: https://youtu.be/eRuadb28-vA My playlist on garden topics: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel is Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Enchanted Valley" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Photo credits: 1. Gigantic allium: Chris Gladis. Image used unchanged. Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Allium_Giganteum_(4).jpg Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en 2. Garlic bulblets in flowers collage: Lisa Gordon Photography. Images combined. Source: http://www.lisa-gordon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Unknown-Flower-1.jpg and http://www.lisa-gordon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Unknown-Flower-2.jpg Used under CC BY NC-4.0 license: http://www.lisa-gordon.com/?page_id=2522 and http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ 3. White Flower Farm online catalog screen captures used under Fair Use Doctrine for educational purposes.
Views: 12130 Haphazard Homestead
Foraging Wild Edibles: Fix your garden problem by eating the weeds
 
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Have you ever faced weeds in your garden? So many weeds that it's intimidating? What if those weeds could be the first harvest of your garden rehab? That would be a good deal, I think! In this video, I'm rehabbing a little raised bed garden that I have ignored for too long. I found 11 kinds of edible weeds and made a giant pot of wild greens with ham hocks -- enough to feed me for days! But I also found a weed that's highly toxic! See if you can tell which weed that is! I've got some tips for foraging weeds from your garden or yard, too. I've had requests from some of you to show more of my gardens. So I will be doing that over this summer. I'm starting with a reality check -- a neglected raised bed garden. Looking over the weeds in here, there's a lot of good eating! I have a video about 2 strategies for how to efficiently pick garden weeds to eat. For this project, I'm using the strategy of picking a wide assortment of weeds. So I'm starting off with a lot of bowls to hold the different kinds of weeds that I'm picking. That's because it's important to Pick Organized! It's a lot easier that way to double-check in the kitchen that I don't have any plants that I don't want, like the really toxic one! In picking garden weeds, we don't have to take everything. They're weeds, after all, so it's OK to high-grade, and just take the best plants back to the kitchen. But it is important to Pick Clean! Don't just pull a weed and toss it into the bowl. Cut the roots off so the soil doesn't make it back to the kitchen. And double-check any clumps of plants to make sure there's nothing mixed in with that 1 kind of plant. As I find each kind of plant, I tell you about it. When the picking is over, I give you a chance to identify what I have in my big bowls. After clearing out my raised bed, it's all ready to plant now. And I've got a big batch of delicious wild greens to eat, too! Enough for days! Here's the plants I harvested: Nipplewort - Lapsana communis Dandelion - Taraxacum officinale Common Sowthistle - Sonchus oleraceus Prickly Sowthistle - Sonchus asper Prickly Wild Lettuce - Lactuca serriola Hedge Mustard - Sisymbrium officinale Cleavers, Stick-Tights, and lots of other names - Galium aparine Bristly Hawksbeard - Crepis setosa Bittercress - Cardamine hirsuta Purple Deadnettle - Lamium purpureum Wild Carrot, Queen Anne's Lace - Daucus carota ------------------------- Poison Hemlock - Conium maculatum - DO NOT EAT! My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #wildgreens #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Bummin on Tremolo", "Carpe Diem", "Final Battle of the Dark Wizards", "Happy Alley", and "Life of Riley" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 13155 Haphazard Homestead
How to use elephant garlic leaves
 
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This video is about using the leaves of the Elephant Garlic. I use a lot of elephant garlic leaves. Welcome to video number four in a seven-part series about using all the different parts of elephant garlic. There is a lot more to this great plant than just the giant bulbs and cloves. I do not pick leaves from the elephant garlic that I'm growing to make the big bulbs. I don't want any energy being lost or diverted from going into the big bulbs. I do pick leaves from the elephant garlic that I'm growing for flowers, or for spring leeks, or that frow as weeds around where I live. Between all thouse options (flowers, spring leeks, and weeds), there are plenty of elephant garlic leaves to use! Maybe you are thinking - Hey, what do you use these leaves for? I think their best use is in fresh salads. I use them in so many garden and weed salads. But the chopped leaves are good in scrambled eggs or Ramen noodle soup, too - nothing so complicated that their flavor gets lost. I pick and use elephant garlic leaves starting in the late fall or early winter, when the bulbs start sprouting in the cooler weather. I keep picking leaves until mis-spring. As the elephant garlic leaves get bigger, they get a stronger, hotter flavor and they start to get a little tough. But there is one more thing I can make with the elephant garlic leaves at that stage. It sounds strange, but it is amazing, and that's fermented elephant garlic leaves. They are delicious! I'm going to post a separate video about how to make and use fermented elephant garlic leaves, so stay tuned for that. Well, I hope you are enthused about planting more elephant garlic or getting more out of the elephant garlic that you already have. Elephant garlic harvest #1: Spring leeks -- https://youtu.be/m1A_vj3F2pY Elephant garlic harvest #2: Garlic scapes - https://youtu.be/eRuadb28-vA Elephant garlic harvest #3: Low-cost giant allium flowers - https://youtu.be/fsupB6wJhZ0 Dehydrate elephant garlic leeks - https://youtu.be/_aI25gxqIsE Mulching elephant garlic with leaves -- https://youtu.be/-iwT_PQgBCg My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 6108 Haphazard Homestead
Pruning Hops: 3 Reasons + How-to Tips
 
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Hops grow better with spring pruning. Take better care of your hop plants. Get more out the plants that you have! Here are 3 reasons to prune. And tips for making the most out of pruning hop shoots. --------------- Even if you don't brew beer, hops are great plants to have in your home landscape. They are such tough plants, they are almost weeds. But hops will do better with just a little bit of help, to prune and train them in the spring. In this video, I'm giving you 3 reasons for pruning your hop plants in the spring. I follow that with tips on how to be the most effective at pruning your hop shoots, and how to get the most out of your plants. Home hop growers have some real advantages over commercial operations. -------- REASON 1 - INCREASE YOUR YIELD The goal of pruning the hop shoots is to focus the hop plant's energy on making hop flowers and cones. Those first shoots in spring want to run and spread that hop plant, to cover a lot of distance and set roots. So there's a long distance between the nodes where the leaves come out. But look how hops grow. The flowers that turn into hop cones grow on side shoots from the nodes. So the closer the nodes are, the bigger your yield can be. In addition, those first ho shoots are hollow. They are not strong. It's easy for them to kink and snap. And then you have a busted bine - and that's no good! Yes, I said "Bine". With a B, and not "Vine" with a V. "Bine" is a botanical distinction about how the plant wraps around stuff like a boa constrictor, rather than using tendrils like a grape vine. If you cut off all the early shoots, the later bines that come up are not hollow. And they have a lot shorter spaces between the side shoots that bear the hop crop. Bby pruning, you'll have stronger bines and more side shoots to give you a larger hop crop. --------- REASON 2 - DISEASE PREVENTION Pruning your hop shoots will cut down on the risk and severity of 2 big diseases of hops - powdery mildew and downy mildew. Even though powdery mildew and downy mildew are completely unrelated, they both overwinter, down underground, inside the buds of next year's growth -- in the tips of the shoots that come up in the spring. So commercial growers, to be efficient, come though once or twice, with machines or chemical sprays to remove or kill all those early buds and the first flush of vegetation. ----------- REASON 3 - EAT YOUR HOP SHOOTS Here's where home hop growers have a real advantage over commercial growers. We get to eat the hop shoots that we prune! Hop plants are worth growing, just for the early shoots. They are that good! Most commercial hop growers can't afford to harvest their hop shoots. But as home hop growers, we can watch over our hops and harvest those shoots all through the spring. ----------- HOP PRUNING TIPS When you first see those earliest shoots, cut them off. It's OK to cut them off below ground level, where the shoots are white and tender. And great for making pickled hop shoots. As the spring progresses, keep cutting the shoots back, especially if the weather is making conditions just right. That's anytime temperatures are above 40 degrees F and the soil is wet. Especially if cloudy, overcast conditions stick around and there's high humidity at around the hop vegetation. If any shoots look stunted, wilted, covered with a white coating, or just weird in any way, get rid of them. But the ones that look good are fine to eat. Keep cutting all the shoots, every one, until 3 or 4 weeks before you want to train your hop bines to go up their support structure. Do the last pruning and harvest of hop shoots when you are selecting the 3-4 bines to train to grow up their support and bear the late summer hop crop. For all the other bines, break off the tips to eat, and cut off their main bines at ground level. The season for pruning hop shoots can be long. This year, I started pruning my hops on February 26 and finished when I trained my bines on May 3. So there can be a lot of hop shoots to harvest and eat! You can eat them, freeze the, or get a couple jars ready to make pickled hop shoots. Put your harvest, a few shoots at a time, in the pickle jar. That's easy! --------------- So now you are ready to increase your harvest of hop cones, protect your plants from disease, and enjoy a springtime bonus harvest of hop shoots. Happy hop growing! ------ My hops playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjCCTnFEJA5-dw6TcrrHVhUY Individual Hop Videos: How to Pick, Process and Store Hops: https://youtu.be/e7G7o5L-RDI 5 Ways to Eat Hop Shoots: https://youtu.be/F8jFxw317kQ How to Make Pickled Hop Shoots: https://youtu.be/4vusymemnQA Music: "Marty Gots a Plan" - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 3112 Haphazard Homestead
Cooking Monster Dandelion Greens: One Weird Trick!
 
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After being away from the homestead, I've returned to find things are out of control -- including a lot of gigantic dandelion greens. Are they too big to be tasty? Not if you know this "one weird trick" for preparing late season spring greens! What's the trick? Strip the center rib out of each dandelion leaf. Then the usual steps apply: 1. blanch in boiling water, 2. cook in a new batch of boiling water until tender. These dandelion greens, even late in the spring, and with some having flowered already, taste great! I'll be using them to make wilted dandelion greens in an upcoming video, so be sure to subscribe if you want to be notified about that video. Dandelion: Taraxacum officinale, Family Asteraceae My channel: "Haphazard Homestead" https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA My wild edibles playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My cooking playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAOiHxDZ-kYltFC4L9DPafT
Views: 3820 Haphazard Homestead
Get Free Wood Chips: 8 Tips and 3 Tricks
 
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Wood chips are a great resource for gardening. But why spend money to get them when you don't have to? I use a lot of wood chips and I get all mine for free. In this video, I give tips and tricks for getting free wood chips from 2 different sources. The first is where you go get the free wood chips, the second is where the free wood chips come to you. So, first, where can you get free wood chips? Here's the first trick: Your city or county government may have a Free Wood Chip Program. Tip #1: Find out if your local government has a Free Wood Chip program and learn its details in advance of when you need the chips. Tip #2: Scout out the wood chip pickup locations and see which one will work best for you. Tip #3: Determine in advance what quality of wood chips you are willing to accept. Tip #4: Keep an eye on the wood chip pile at the site that works for you. When you see something good, then go get the permit. Don't get a permit before you've sen the quality of what's available. I'll admit that getting wood chips from your local government may be free, but you still have to do get the chips and that costs money for gas, and your time, and maybe you don't have a way to haul those wood chips around. What if you could get the wood chips delivered to you for free? Here's the second trick: There is a lot a tree trimming going on by arborists, tree trimming companies, and even local utilities like the electric utility. Tip #5: Your county cooperative extension office may have a list of mulch and compost sources for your area. Here's one for my county. Or contact your local utilities. Or just look up tree trimming companies for your town and start calling them. Tip #6: Get on all the lists now or as soon as possible. If you want to do a favor for your friends and family, get them signed up right away, too. It may still take awhile for you to get any free wood chips delivered this way. So here's the third trick -- Listen for the sounds of opportunity. What is that? The sound of chainsaws and industrial sized wood chippers. Tip #7: Make it easy for the crew to give the wood chips to you. What do I mean by that? A busy, hard-working crew wants clear and simple directions to where they should drop their wood chips. They want easy access for whatever equipment they have, whether it's a small trailer or a big boom truck. They don't want to drive over rough ground or soft ground. And they sure don't want to run into overhead wires! So have an easily accessible drop off location already figured out. Tip #8: use a team approach to get your chips. Make sure everyone in your household who is old enough knows the drill about talking to the head of the crew and has the instructions for specifically where to drop off the wood chips. Team up with your neighbors, too, especially if any of them are home a lot and could talk to the crew, or if any of them have a space that's easier to drop off a load of chips. You can all share the free wood chips. After all, part of a pile of free wood chips is better than no wood chips at all! I hope you can use these tips and tricks to get all the free wood chips that you can use! if you have any tips or tricks for getting free wood chips, please let me know in the comments! My video on mulching fruit trees with wood chips and cardboard: https://youtu.be/0mFurcHJvo0 My playlist on gardening topics: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "The Forest and the Trees and "Guts and Bourbon" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 37123 Haphazard Homestead
Purple Potatoes! A review of Magic Molly Potatoes from garden to table
 
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Do you like potatoes? Do you like to grow potatoes? There are so many unique varieties of potatoes that you can't get an an average store. You have to grow them yourself or get a buddy to do it. Even then, it's hard to know what variety of potatoes to grow. In this video, I review a really neat little potato -- the Magic Molly, a purple potato. Yes, a purple potato. I'm not saying I'm the best potato grower around, but I do enjoy growing and eating potatoes. I got a late start in growing my Magic Molly potatoes. They are supposed to be a good storage potato that keeps for a long time. I usually plant my storage potatoes at the start of June here in Oregon's Willamette Valley. But I was a couple weeks late getting these in. The harvest was good anyway, in early November. One issue with a purple potato is that they are hard to see in dark, rich soil like here at Haphazard Homestead. Magic Molly potatoes are considered a fingerling potato, so I didn't expect them to get big. But they did turn out to be larger than most varieties of fingerlings. And their yield was alright, at 8.5 pounds from 1 pound of tubers to start with. Magic Mollies are a nice beep color right out of the earth. After curing them for a few days, the dried soil on them kind of blocks their pretty color. But I'm not about to wash my potatoes until I use them. I think they store better that way. Here's an issue with dark potatoes - it's hard to tell them from stones. These Magic Molly potatoes did store well -- even for a full 5 months later, and even one with a divot out of it was in good shape. Now let's talk about how they are for eating. I baked some in the oven. They are good with stuffed squash and with cabbage and onions. Boiling Magic Mollies changes their color from a deep purple to more of a lavender. But they do make good mashed potatoes that are fun for an Easter dinner. And Magic Mollies make decent over-baked home fries. I topped these crispy fries with the tart lemon tang of wild sumac berries -- that's good business! Cutting the Magic Mollies ever more fine than for fries, they make a great breakfast hash, wit ha fun deep-purple color. I even used the Magic Molly potatoes in trying a cheese-free cheesecake recipe from the 18th century, from the one on the great YouTube channel by James Townsend and Son. That will be in a future video. I hope you've enjoyed this review of Magic Molly potatoes. If you've grown these potatoes or have other varieties you recommend, I'd really like to know. Planting pre-sprouted potatoes in early spring: https://youtu.be/9sJamDq5t_U Four reasons to mulch early potatoes: https://youtu.be/KFn9y7EtBSg Using potatoes to break new ground: https://youtu.be/ehCiBrfb5Z4 My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #gardening #potatoes #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead THe channel for James Townsend and Son: https://www.youtube.com/user/jastownsendandson The interview with potato breeder, Bill Campbell: http://spudman.com/article/spudman-7-bill-campbell/ Music: "Life of Riley", "Marty Gots a Plan", "Fretless" and "Guts and Burbon" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 6554 Haphazard Homestead
How to Make Spruce Tree and Pine Pollen Cookies
 
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Pine pollen cookies are great, spruce tree cookies are great. But spruce tree and pine pollen, together, make a super great cookie! Here's how I make Spruce Tree and Pine Pollen Cookies: Step 1: Get some new growth off a spruce tree. I soaked that new growth in some water, which I used to make some great Spruce Tree Sorbet. But for these cookies, I'm interested in the soft spruce needles left in the jar. My video on how to harvest the new growth of spruce trees: https://youtu.be/CF97dTQIQqY My video on how to make Spruce Tree Sorbet: https://youtu.be/WfdFwr7mg6g Step 2: Get some pine pollen. I'll be posting a video on how to do this, soon. Step 3: Get to baking some cookies. This is a small batch, because I was limited by my amount of pine pollen. I creamed together 2 Tablespoons of butter and 2 Tablespoons of sugar. I stirred in 1/4 cup to 1/3 cup flour. I added in 1/4 cup of the pine pollen and stirred it in. I finely chopped the soft spruce needles, about 1/2 cup to 3/4 cup, and put them in. I added only enough of the little bit of water remaining in the jar with the spruce needles to get a nice cookie dough consistency -- it didn't take much at all. I made drop cookies with about 1 Tablespoon of dough for each cookie, on an ungreased baking sheet. I bakes them at about 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 12-15 minutes. That's it! Step 4: Get to eating some good cookies! Any sugar cookie or butter cookie recipe would work well for Spruce Tree and Pine Pollen Cookies. Just leave out the vanilla, cinnamon, or other spices to allow the flavor of the spruce tree and pine pollen to come through. I hope you get a chance to make Spruce Tree and Pine Pollen Cookies,! I'd love to hear from you about how you liked them! Spruce trees: Genus Picea, Pine family (Pineaceae) Pine trees: Genus Pinus, Pine family (Pinaceae) My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 2142 Haphazard Homestead
Wild Greens: Homestead Haul 2 with wild geranium, wild lettuce, sowthistle
 
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As the spring season progresses, new kinds of wild greens appear. On my single day foray around the homestead, three new kinds of wild spring greens had popped up to be harvested, in the "back 40". This back part of the homestead has the usual spring greens of dandelions, plantain, cress, dock, and chives. I also found more field mustard than earlier in the spring. But the new edible weeds that I picked are a wild geranium, a wild lettuce, and a sowthistle, which really isn't a thistle at all. Part 1 of this mini-series covered my foraging at the front part of my homestead. Part 2 is about the edible weeds in the back part of the homestead. Part 3 covers cleaning and preparing all the greens, including looking at some of the finer points of identifying some of the plants. Dovesfoot Geranium: Geranium molle, Family Geraniaceae Prickly Lettuce: Lactuca serriola, Family Asteraceae Prickly Sowthistle, Sonchus asper, Family Asteraceae Field mustard: Brassica rapa, Family Brassicacae (mustard family) Dock: Rumex crispus, Family Polygonaceae (buckwheat family) Dandelion: Taraxacum officianale, Family Asteraceae Chives: Allium schoenoprasum, Family Amaryllidaceae (amyrillis family) Dandelion: Taraxacum officianale, Family Asteraceae Cleavers: Galium aparine. Family: Rubiaceae Plantain: Platago lanceolata Family: Plantaginaceae Bittercress: Cardamine ssp. Family: Brassicacae. Please feel free to share this video. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 2472 Haphazard Homestead
Foraging a Wild Edible Salad: with 11 common spring weeds, tree leaves, and flowers
 
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What does spring mean to me? It means it's a great time to eat wild salads. There are so many great wild plants to eat raw in the springtime. In this video, I pick and use 11 common spring wild edibles. I make a wonderful salad! Here are the plants I'm using: 1. American elm leaves - Ulmus americana 2. Cleavers, aka Stick-tight, Bedstraw, Goosegrass - Galium aparine 3. Nipplewort - Lapsana communis 4. Common Dandelion - Taraxacum officinale 5. Eastern Larch or Tamarack - Larix laricina 6. Sheep sorrel - Rumex acetosella 7. Wild chives - Allium schoenoprasum 8. Red Norway Maple - Acer platanoides 9. Curly Dock or Yellow Dock - Rumex crispus 10. Narrowleaf Plantain - Plantago lanceolata 11. Wild Field Mustard - Brassica rapa Here's another springtime wild salad - It has over 20 different weeds, tree leaves, and flowers in it: https://youtu.be/GCwNlz7IDU0 My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Life of Riley", "Plain Loafer", "Vivacity", and "WInner Winner" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 3393 Haphazard Homestead
Collard Flower Stalks: Bonus Harvest
 
02:20
I let my collards stay in the garden over the winter. Now they are setting seed. But first, they have to flower -- and the flower stalks are delicious! I just pick them, cut off any part that's not tender, blanch them by dropping them in boiling water for about two minutes, and that's it! They are tasty even raw -- I think the flower stalks are tastier than broccoli! I'm going to let the top-most flower stalks set seed. Even though this variety, Flash, is a hybrid, and won't reproduce exactly, I can still use the seeds for sprouts or micro greens. I'll also plant some, too, out of curiosity about what quality of larger greens I might get. But I don't want to let all the stalks set seed and mature. That would tie up this bed and keep me from growing other crops. So, I'm going to eat these flower stalks lower on the collard. I just need to pick them before they get too woody and tough.
Views: 2514 Haphazard Homestead
Foraging Feral Chives and Wild Chives
 
03:52
I don't grow chives in my garden. Instead, I let the grass grow in the spring and harvest wild chives that are scattered around the Haphazard Homestead. Wild chives are the same plant as domesticated garden chives, but they exist in the wild, too, so I consider them a "feral" food. I harvest a lot of wild chives just by wandering around the Homestead. Then I cut the chives into small pieces, put them in some jars, and put the jars in my freezer. Then I have chives to use all year long, without having to weed or water. I could dehydrate them, too, but then I would have to rehydrate about 3 times as many as I need to use. It's easier to just use them straight from the freezer. The chives come up in the same clumps year after year, and I harvest the clumps many times over the spring season. These same kind of chives grow in woodlands and meadows, too, and can be foraged in exactly the same way. Wild chives are just as good to eat as chives grown in a garden. Let the grass grow and find real food for regular people! Do less and get more -- what could be better? Wild chives (and garden chives): Allium schoenoprasum, Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis family) Music: "Winner Winner" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 2121 Haphazard Homestead
Wild Greens: Homestead Haul 1 with dandelion, cleavers, plantain, dock, cress and rocket mustard
 
10:41
As spring progresses, wild greens get bigger, tougher, sometimes more bitter, hot, or acrid. Some of them change in their looks, too. This video shows how I forage some common spring greens as spring moves on and the plants get older. I harvest dock, dandelion, cress, cleavers, rocket or hedge mustard, plantain, and chives. If you've watched my earlier videos, you've seen all these plants, but at different stages of growth earlier in the spring. Here are strategies I use for foraging later in the spring: 1. Go out after rains have invigorated lush new growth even on older plants. 2. Go into shaded areas where the vegetation is more delicate than out in the harsh sun. 3. Go into taller grass where the wild greens have to grow tall and fast to compete with the grass for light. 4. Go back to the same plants harvested earlier in the spring. They will have put on new, tender growth. 5. Harvest only the tender parts of the plant, which sometimes may be a different part like the flower stalks instead of the leaves. These wild spring greens can be real food for regular people! I pick them regularly all season long. And I don't even have to plant them, them just grow on their own in my yard, but I don't cut my grass very short or very often. Do less, get more! Dock: Rumex crispus, Family Polygonaceae (buckwheat family) Dandelion: Taraxacum officianale, Family Asteraceae Bittercress: Cardamine oligosperma, Family: Brassicacae. Cleavers: Galium aparine. Family: Rubiaceae Rocket or Hedge Mustard: Sisymbrium officinale Plantain: Platago lanceolata Family: Plantaginaceae Chives: Allium schoenoprasum, Family Amaryllidaceae (amyrillis family) I have picked these greens all during the spring. Check out my earlier videos that over these wild spring greens: Dock, wild arugula: https://youtu.be/rRZ6qhvo-TY Cress: https://youtu.be/dISq9K7B7Vs Arugula, dock, dandelions, chives: https://youtu.be/nG-6M3Xong8 Plantain, dock, cress, cleavers, dandelion greens: https://youtu.be/RwghbcUwY7M Chives: https://youtu.be/7nUirr-bEKM Dandelion, dock, plantain: https://youtu.be/ogjgoEIvfag Music: "River Valley Breakdown"" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 8719 Haphazard Homestead
Ferment Elephant Garlic Leaves: How to Make and Use
 
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This video shows how to ferment elephant garlic leaves. I can get a big pile of their leaves to all fit in a pint jar. Fermentation transforms these elephant garlic leaves into a delicious food! Here's how: Step 1. Rinse the leaves and dry them off with a towel. They don't have to be perfectly dry. But I don't want chlorine from the tap water to interfere with the bacteria that do the fermentation. Step 2. Shred all leaves , lengthwise and crosswise. This takes a sharp knife and some good knife skills. Don't get hurt! Step 3. Add salt. I used only 1-1/2 teaspoons of salt for that big pule of elephant garlic leaves. The salt needs to have no additives, so no iodized salt. Canning salt and kosher salt are OK. The sale is not a preservative here. It's drawing out the water that is naturally in the elephant garlic leaves. Layer the salt with the leaves and leave it all to sit for an hour or two. Step 4. Massage the elephant garlic leaves. This sounds silly but it's part of the process. The goal is tow work those leaves and draw out the water that's inside them. Don' bruise or tear the leaves, just massage them. The whole massaging process took me 5 minutes, start to finish. Then let it sit for another hour or two. Step 5. Pack all the leaves into the jar - really pack them in tight. They need to be so tight in that jar, that the liquid from the leaves will completely cover the leaves in the jar. Step 6.Make sure that no air can get to those leaves for the next week or two, while the bacteria that are naturally on the elephant garlic leaves can work their magic. The leaves need to be held at least a 1/2 inch under the liquid. We don't want any metal to react with the salt in the jar, so metal lids won't work. That's also why I use a wooden spoon and glass bowl in the earlier steps. A simple trick is to use a glass or smaller jar to hold down the leaves. Fill that glass or jar with water, to make it heavy enough to hold all the leaves down. A fermentation airlock would work fine, too. But this simple trick has always worked for me. Step 7. Let the bacteria work their magic. Put the little "fermentation tower" on a plate, becasue as the bacteria are working, that liquid from the leaves will bubble over the top. I leave the whole thin on my kitchen counter, out of the way, for at least a week. This batch is 10 days old and it's ready. The color has changed and the jar has stopped bubbling. If I press on the top jar, more bubbles come up, so the bacteria are still working a little, but it's done enough. Step 8. Put a lid on it and put it in the refrigerator. I keep my jar of fermented elephant garlic leaves in the refrigerator. I don't do all this for food preservation, I do it for the magical transformation of the leaves into a different and delicious food! I know the fermented leaves keep a year in the refrigerator, but usually I use it all up way before then. You may be thinking - hey, how do I use these fermented elephant garlic leaves? I eat them straight out of the jar, even though they are chewy. But most of the time, I chop them up fine. They are great in scrambled eggs or mashed potatoes. But they are also great, straight up, on topic of cheese in a snack platter. They are great in a mixed wild salad, to spice up a pan-roasted patty pan squash, and in a squash stir-fry. I really like them in slaw, like a slaw made of grated raw winter squash, raw dandelion greens, the fermented elephant garlic leaves, and a balsamic vinaigrette. I hope you will think about planting elephant garlic in an out of the way place where it can grow like weeds. And you can use their leaves, straight up or fermented. These fermented elephant garlic leaves are worth the efffort! Elephant garlic harvest #1: Spring leeks -- https://youtu.be/m1A_vj3F2pY Elephant garlic harvest #2: Garlic scapes - https://youtu.be/eRuadb28-vA Elephant garlic harvest #3: Low-cost giant allium flowers - https://youtu.be/fsupB6wJhZ0 Elephant garlic harvest #4: How to use elephant garlic leaves - https://youtu.be/mL4OHN1-M3k Dehydrate elephant garlic leeks - https://youtu.be/_aI25gxqIsE Mulching elephant garlic with leaves -- https://youtu.be/-iwT_PQgBCg My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Happy Alley" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 2924 Haphazard Homestead
Garden Allotment Tag for Haphazard Homestead: recorded Jan 23, 2016
 
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I was tagged to do the Garden Allotment challenge back at the start of 2016. I had troubles with my recorded files, but now, that's all straightened out and I can answer the Garden Allotment questions. Thanks, Peaches, for tagging me to do the Garden Allotment Challenge and sorry it took so long to post! Peaches' channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/lovers4healthylife I tagged 4 people: Lark: https://www.youtube.com/user/dkulikowski Old Alabama Gardener: https://www.youtube.com/user/OldAlabamaGardener Bernard: https://www.youtube.com/user/navajopa31 Nicole: https://www.youtube.com/user/superslyfoxx1 Here are the 10 Garden Allotment questions: 1) How long have you had your plot (or garden). 2) How long did you have to wait for your allotment (or garden). 3) Where did you learn about gardening. 4) Do you plant a winter garden. 5) What has been your biggest success this year / ever. 6) What has been your biggest gardening disaster. 7) Do you have a tried and true crop variety that you always grow. 8) Are you planning on trying anything new next year. (or this year) 9) How do you preserve your crops. 10) What is your favorite meal to cook with veg from the plot. My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA My TSU network channel, with lots of photos from here on the Homestead and out & about: http://www.tsu.co/HaphazardHomestead/photos Music: "Carpe Diem", "Teller of the Tales", "Plain Loafer", "Fretless", and "Vivacity" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ #gardenallotmenttag #mygarden #mygardenhistory #mygardenstory #gardentag -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Make Pickled Hop Shoots - Pickle Your Hop Shoots" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vusymemnQA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 1161 Haphazard Homestead
Springtime Collard Harvest: Picking and Freezing
 
05:15
My collards came through the winter having been harvested many times -- by me and by slugs! But in the spring, the collards started growing fast, reaching for the sky, and setting on flower buds. So I harvested some of the new collard greens, as well as some of the older leaves that were in worse shape. Not all garden produce is perfect, but it can still be great! I ended up with three categories of collards: company quality, soup quality, and "special project" collards that were too thin and wispy. I'll use those in a cookout in a future video. In this video, I cut, blanch, and freeze collard greens so they can be used later. This variety of collards is Flash. It's a hybrid and really performed well in my garden. I'm also letting the collards set seed to grow sprouts and microgreens, and to plant to see what genetic diversity emerges since a hybrid won't breed true to form. To try that 17th century pepper-spice mix, check out the James Townsend and Son website: http://jas-townsend.com/frazers-mixed-spices-p-1278.html Music: "Guts and Bourbon" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 3517 Haphazard Homestead
Dandelion Flowers: Three Ways to Deep Fry Dandelion Flowers
 
07:26
In this video, I show you three ways that I have enjoyed dandelion flowers - deep-fried! I know that I shouldn't be eating deep-fried food all that often. But there's no getting around it -- deep-fried dandelion flowers are good. So I try to limit eating them this way, to the peak dandelion flower season. The rest of the time, I eat dandelion flowers in healthier ways, like in salads, omelettes, and more salads. To pick the dandelion flowers, I look for big flowers that are fully open, in their prime. I could just pull their heads off by hand, but I find it goes a lot faster to just touch their stems with a sharp knife. I can tell, for sure, that there are real dandelions and not one of the look-alikes that I'll show in future videos. Real dandelions can have a bunch of flowers, but each flower is on their own stem, that comes out of the center of the base of the plant. Real dandelions only have one flower on each stem, and that stem is hollow. It's easiest to cut the flower heads off and then clean them up back in the kitchen. I let the flowers sit awhile to let any insects of spiders wander off on their own. I take off the sepals, or the little green fringe under the flowers, because it's bitter. If a flower falls apart while I'm messing with it, I just set it aside to use the petals separately. This seems like it might be tedious work, but it goes pretty quickly, and I shouldn't be eating that many deep-fried dandelion flowers, anyway. Here some the deep fry! I just mix an egg, buttermilk, and some flour until it's thin enough to dip the dandelion flowers. I put the dipped flowers in a cast iron skillet with an inch or two of hot cooking oil, like sunflowers or vegetable oil.The oil is hot, but not smoking hot. I let the fried flowers sit on a towel or paper towel to let them drain a bit. For the second way, I go back to the thick batter I abandoned earlier and mix in the loose flower petals I had abandoned, too. I mix them both to make a dandelion flower fritter. I cook them in the cast iron skillet and hot oil, just the same way as before, although it takes longer than those little flowers - they cooked fast! The third way gives the dandelion flowers a completely different flavor! They aren't donuts - they have a great mushroom flavor, it's amazing! The batter is a thin flour and water mixture, like a tempura batter. I use a real deep fryer. In the deep fryer, the dandelions cook more evenly and with the thin batter, the flavor of the dandelions comes through a lot more. The deep fryers are nice because you an set the oil to a constant temperature - I think I used 300 to 350 degrees for these flowers. I put the cooked flowers on a towel or paper towel, the same way as before. Dandelions flowers cooked this way are really good! And they go perfectly well with soup or chili, and a good beer. But don't forget that dandelion flowers are healthier as part of a good salad made from weeds or as part of a wild weed omelette. I hope you get to enjoy dandelion flowers one way or another sometime soon. Here's another video on eating dandelions: https://youtu.be/lWBDN2MkWOM My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #dandelionflowers #deepfriedfood #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Corncob" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 15979 Haphazard Homestead
Will This Mushroom Make Me Sick? #2 ID'ing Forest Mushrooms
 
10:01
I went for a walk in a rich, dense forest and found two strange-looking mushrooms. So I though you might like to play a game I call -- Will I Eat This, Or Not? Here's how the game goes. I will show some key features of these mushrooms that will allow you to mull over whether I will eat them or not. Then, I will go through the steps and thought process I use to identify the mushrooms and decide whether I will eat them or not. ------- These are Lobster mushrooms, Hypomces lactiflourum. They are an oddball fungus that parasitizes other mushrooms. In this case, the Hypomyces has taken over a short-stemmed Russula, Russula brevipes. The Hypomyces is specific about which mushrooms they parasitize. I enjoy eating lobster mushrooms. At the end of this video, I show some outtakes of cooking them and using them to make grilled stuffed squash flowers. They were delicious! To identify these mushrooms, I am using a key. An identification key is a great tool for focusing on specific features of a mushroom and making "either-or" decisions that ultimately lead to figuring out what kind it is. To find out the general type of mushroom I've got, I use the inside cover from the book, "All That The Rain Promises and More", by David Aurora. The book I use in this video: All That the Rain Promises and More, by David Aurora. Ten Speed Press. The Mykoweb is a great resource for information about mushrooms and fungus! Check it out: http://www.mykoweb.com My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X Music: "Angel Share", "Garden Music", and "Carefree" - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 1794 Haphazard Homestead
How to make elderberry flower tea
 
03:11
I'm inviting you to stick around for 3 minutes of relaxation, to enjoy some tea made from the flowers of the elderberry bush. I'll show how to make elderberry flower tea, first from the fresh flowers and then from the dried flowers. Step 1 is to get some good elderberry flowers. Check out my last video to more about that. To make fresh elder flower tea, step 2 is to put a cluster of flowers in a cup. There might be a bug. Step one and a half is to shake that flower cluster to make sure to dislodge anything you don't want to drink. You can't wash those flowers because that would wash off the pollen, where the flavor comes from. Step 3 is to pour on some boiling water and let it all set awhile. I admit I got distracted and it was a good 10 minutes before I got back. Step 4 is to take out the flower cluster. If you have company, it might be better to strain the tea, but that's up to you. Let's find out how it tastes.... If you dry some of your flowers and put them in a jar, you can have elder blow tea any time. Check out my last video to find out more about drying those flowers. My elder blow isn't the prettiest, but that's because I let some of it dry in the bright light rather than a dark place. Step 1 is to put some dried flowers in a tea contraption. The amount I'm using was good for 3 cups of tea. Step 2 is to pour on boiling water and let it all set awhile. I admit, I got distracted again and let this sit 15 minutes, so it was good and strong. Let's find out how it tastes. I hope you get a chance to enjoy some tea from the elderberry bush, whether it's fresh or dried. I'm too relaxed to ask you to subscribe, share, or comment, but you could do that. I hope you have been able to relax a bit, too. I hope things are going well at your place. Thanks for watching. Bye! Elderberry: Sambucus nigra, and subspecies S. canadensis and S. cerulea, Family Adoxaceae My video on picking and using elderberry flowers: https://youtu.be/TiaTrbVcDB0 My playlist on foraging wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My playlist on homestead cooking: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAOiHxDZ-kYltFC4L9DPafT My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Dreamy Flashback" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 4660 Haphazard Homestead
Oregon Curlfree Peach Trees: Resistant to Peach Leaf Curl, Productive and Delicious - Variety Review
 
04:46
Are you looking for a peach tree that is trouble-free to grow, that is also delicious and productive? This video shows why the Oregon Curlfree Peach is my favorite peach tree to grow. Why is it called "Oregon Curlfree"? Because it's resistant to Peach Leaf Curl. What's peach leaf curl? It's the scourge of peach growers everywhere where the spring weather is wet and cool, generally below 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Peach trees can be really challenging to grow - or even keep alive - in those cool and wet springtime conditions. Plenty of folks will spray to prevent peach leaf curl, but that costs money. And that spraying has to be consistent over time, with each spraying done at just the right time. The Oregon Curlfree Peach tree doesn't need any of that! So it's a great peach for growing organic fruit. Oregon Curlfree is a pretty little peach tree. It's a smaller sized tree that fits will in an urban landscape. It's easy to keep at only 8 feet high. And it does well even when it's not in full, direct sun all day. The tree and its pink blossoms look nice enough for growing in a front yard, too! But what about the peaches? Oregon Curlfree peaches are amazing as a peach for eating fresh, right off the tree. That's the advantage of a homegrown Oregon Curlfree peach -- you can wait until they are really ripe. Oregon Curlfree peaches don't necessarily look ripe, though, because they keep a greenish cast, even when they are soft. When the top of the peaches give a little, under the pressure of your thumb, they are perfect! Some peaches will get mealy and lose flavor if they are left to mature on the tree too long. Not Oregon Curlfree! They just get sweeter and sweeter, peachier and peachier, and juicier and juicier! If you're going to eat the peach, whole, do it outdoors, leaning over, so all that juice doesn't dribble down your shirt! THere are folks that don't like the fuzziness of a peach - and Oregon Curlfree peaches are fuzzy! But they peel so easily when they are ripe! And they are cling-free, or freestone, peaches, too. So the pits some out clean and easy. That makes for a pretty peach to serve on a plate. I don't think that Oregon Curlfree make very good preaches for cooking, canning, or freezing, because they are a low-acid peach. Instead, because they don't get ripe all at one, just enjoy the amazing abundance of eating fresh peaches, day after day, for 4-6 weeks in the middle of peach season, depending on the weather. Use other peach varieties for cooking or preserving. I'll tell you my recommendation of that sort of peach in an upcoming video. Where can you get an Oregon Curlfree peach tree to plant yourself?The Oregon Curlfree peach is just starting to show up on a few lists of recommended varieties from fruit growing groups and Cooperative Extension, like California, Oregon, and Connecticut. So it's not sold by a lot of nurseries. I'll list some other sources below, too. I don't have any affiliations with any of these places, but I did get my tree by mail order from One Green World in Oregon. I've been growing my Oregon Curlfree peach for over 5 years and I've been so pleased with it. And their flavor is amazing! It's the best flavored peach I have ever eaten! And it has been so free of disease! If you've had trouble with peach leaf curl and like fresh peaches, this could be the right variety for you! Sources for Oregon Curlfree Peaches. If you know other sources, please let us all know in the comments! One Green World, Oregon Rolling River Nursery, California My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Casa Bossa Nova" and "Drankin Song" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 1431 Haphazard Homestead
Harvest Saffron Flowers & Make Saffron Spice: Simple, But So Tiny!
 
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Saffron Crocus flower in the fall and are the source of Saffron Spice. They are easy to grow as a wild flower. And easy to harvest. But it's a time-consuming process to pick each Saffron thread out of every Saffron flower! It's so worthwhile, though, to grow them for yourself, especially since Saffron Spice is so expensive to buy. ------------------ Saffron Crocus Are Interesting Plants to Grow! In some ways, I think the long, grassy leaves that stay green all winter long, are the coolest part of the Saffron plant. But people are mostly just interested in the flower of the Saffron Crocus (Crocus sativus) - and not even the whole flower. Just the bright red threads that make Saffron Spice. I'm not a great gardener of Saffron Crocus, not by a long shot. But I like that they are almost a wildflower. They can take care of themselves. And their season of flowering is the opposite of most crocus. Saffron crocus flower in the autumn, instead of the spring. Here in western Oregon, the leaves and flowers start coming up in late October. ------------------ Saffron Harvest - Picking the Flowers Some folks say to harvest the Saffron threads before the flowers open up. Other folks say to harvest them a few hours after the flowers open. Honestly, between the two, I can't tell any difference in the quality of the Saffron Spice. I just pick flowers as I see them. When the weather is wet, the flowers can get pretty bedraggled. But the threads inside the flower are usually OK. Regardless of the weather, I go out every day and pick the Saffron flowers that are ready -- over a two- to three-week period. Once the Saffron flowers are done flowering, I cover the whole area with a layer of wood chips. And they are good to go for the rest of the year. I have them planted in a spot that gets the hot afternoon sun. And they don't even want any water, through the whole dry summer here in western Oregon. That's because they go dormant and lose their leaves and disappear during the summer. If you grow Saffron Crocus and have any tips, let me and everyone else know in the comments below. ----------------------------------- Processing Saffron Threads After Harvest Once I've picked the flowers, I need to get the Saffron threads out and dried. It's an easy process. I just pull the Saffron threads out, put them on a plate, and let them dry out of the direct sunlight. Every year, the number of flowers seems to triple. And as my crop of Saffron threads has gotten larger and larger, I realize -- growing and harvesting Saffron spice is not a practical retirement plan, even though Saffron threads sell for a good price! I'm not going to process hundreds of thousands of these Saffron threads over 2 to 3 weeks. I'm happy doing just a few at a time, building up a stock of Saffron threads that will last me for a few months. The flowers have such a pleasant scent that it's a shame to toss them out. So I keep them in a vase for a few days. They fill a whole room with a wonderful aroma. It reminds me of my grandmother. When the Saffron threads have dried out for a few days, I put them in a jar, and store them in my pantry, where it is really dark. If you have any tips or suggestions for cooking with Saffron, let us all know in the comments. So far, my favorites have been Saffron-Braised Celery with wild flowers and wild pin cherries, and Saffron Fingerling Potatoes, with wild chanterelle mushrooms and wild garlic potatoes. --------------- The flowers with the Saffron-Braised Celery are fresh Redbud (Cercis canadensis), Wild Field Mustard (Brassica rapa), and Yellow Deadnettle (Lamiastrum galeobdolon), pickled Elephant Garlic flowers (Allium ampeloprasum). And the cherries are wild pin cherries (Prunus avium). Saffron Fingerling Potatoes: butter and saffron, served over Cherry Tomatoes. The other dishes on the plate use Wild Garlic (Allium vinale) leaves and top-set bulbs with Red Pontiac Potatoes. And Wild Pacific Golden Chanterelle mushrooms (Cantharellus formosus). ----------------------- Some of my gardening playlists: Potatoes - An easy and productive garden crop - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjASbYda3uBGHFH57edZLEYQ Elephant Garlic: How to get the most out of growing Elephant Garlic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjD6dEWNXksaTcnAbkS1kV7v Collards: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Collard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBIqUqGKeLPykAxctUzkjHs Here's my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HaphazardHomestead ------------------------- My mailing address: Haphazard Homestead PO Box 40721 Eugene, OR 97404 -------------- Music: "Orbital Romance" by Sir Cubworth, "One Step Closer" by Aakash Gandhi, and "One Fine Day" by Audionautix from YouTube music archive. One Fine Day by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/
Views: 880 Haphazard Homestead
Is My Lambs Quarter Too Old To Eat? How About My Amaranth? * Don't Miss Out on Great Wild Food
 
10:45
Lambs quarter and Amaranth leaves make for great foraging and eating when they are young. But what about when they are older and have started to flower and set seed? This video shows how to identify Lambs quarter and Redroot Pig Weed (Amaranthus retroflexus) when they are older. I show how to assess a plant's quality for eating. And how to choose which parts to keep and which to put in your garden compost pile. Then I cook a fat and delicious omelette, with fermented redbud flowers, too! ------------------------- Here's another Lambs Quarter video: https://youtu.be/OZDY1uR2ZSc Lambs quarter, Chenopodium album, Family Chenopodiaceae (the goosefoot family) Redroot Pig Weed, Amaranthus retroflexus, Family Amaranthaceae (the amaranth family) Redbud, Cercis canadensis, Family Fabaceae (the bean family) --------------------- If you want to improve your foraging skills, here's my playlist - Foraging: Real Food for Regular People - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW If you want to eat what you forage, here are playlists about preparing your harvests: Cooking Wild Greens - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDsPNTAOuzlyBCCcKTvsF6L Wild Salads - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDPp18Eo0HbMT8x3FvGhBhY Here are my playlists about specific wild plants: Dandelions - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC0D-X7QcfJGzY9wE5vw3lp Wild Mustard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBY1bhUcZwxVzymmyt18ndx Elderberry - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDPDOVvA1P8txESkgYB8T0i Spruce Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBd5rDAN-0X9fjHsw-GETmr Pine Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAUzXslTTRRtOtvxXnP04pg Redbud Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBkw17z9Y_PiBoLE-mwuROF Detailed ID of Wild Mushrooms - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjA-FB7HpMdpXMfI0SaiyYon ------------------------------- If you like to garden, too, here are my gardening playlists: Potatoes - An easy and productive garden crop - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjASbYda3uBGHFH57edZLEYQ Elephant Garlic: How to get the most out of growing Elephant Garlic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjD6dEWNXksaTcnAbkS1kV7v Collards: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Collard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBIqUqGKeLPykAxctUzkjHs Hops: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Hop Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjCCTnFEJA5-dw6TcrrHVhUY In the Garden - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW Here's my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HaphazardHomestead --------------------------------- Music: "Daily Beetle", "Carpe Diem", "Groundwork", "Plain Loafer", "Dewdrop Fantasy", and "Bummin on Tremolo" - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ------------------ #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #wildgreens #HaphazardHomestead
Views: 754 Haphazard Homestead
How to make Spruce Tree Sorbet
 
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I've been eating my spruce trees! One thing I've really been enjoying is Spruce Tree Sorbet. It's perfect for a hot summer day. Spruce Tree Sorbet is so easy to make, but I had to think ahead. When the spruce trees were putting out their new growth, I went and picked a bunch! Then I took 2 cups of that new spruce growth and put it in a quart jar filled with water. That spruce water is really tasty to drink, straight up by itself, after about 8 hours in the sun. But it keeps in the refrigerator for a few weeks, too. To make the sorbet, there's just 2 other ingredients: 1/3 cup of honey and a lime. I start by draining the water from the spruce. I don't throw the spruce out -- I save it for some really great cookies. Then I add the honey. I thin the honey by heating it on the stove with about a cup of the spruce water. Then I add the juice from the lime. That's it! To freeze into sorbet, I use a little half-pint manual ice cream maker. I think they still make them, but this one is from the 1980s with an APCRH -- and Admittedly Poorly Crafted Replacement Handle. These manual ice cream makers are great because you don't need any salt or electricity to run. You just put their insert into the freezer the day before and then hand crank. Or, if you are like me, you start off hand cranking and then just put the insert back in the freezer for a half hour and then stir it all up with a spoon before it freezes solid. You could do this with a metal bowl or an ice cube tray, too. I'll be posting more videos about harvesting spruce trees to eat, including the Colorado Blue Spruce, and about cooking with spruce trees, including shortbread, cookies, and some prize-winning balsamic vinegar. What do you think about eating spruce trees? Let me know in the comments! Feel free to share this video. And I hope you will subscribe for maybe a little different perspective on how to enjoy your own homestead -- in the garden, out foraging for wild foods, and cooking. Thanks for watching! Engelmann spruce: Picea engelmanni, Pine family (Pineaceae) Colorado blue spruce: Picea pungens My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 1306 Haphazard Homestead
Wild Field Mustard: How to Pick and Process
 
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This video shows how to identify and pick Wild Field Mustard that's growing as a weed in your garden, or out in the wild. It also shows how to process the wild field mustard back in the kitchen, so you can use different parts of the plant to eat in different ways. Wild field mustard is one of my top 10 #WildGreens of all time. Wild Field Mustard: Brassica rapa (Brassicaceae - the Mustard Family) There are a lot of edible mustards out there. They all taste a little different. I’m talking here about the Field Mustard, Brassica Rapa. Its closest relatives are NOT the mustard greens you find at the store! The field mustard is actually what was domesticated into turnips, Napa Cabbage, and rapini. Just looking at its leaves, #FieldMustard seems so non-descript! How can anybody ever identify it? But there are some easy ways to get started. The bottom leaves of field mustard can get big. They have a big lobe and 1-4 smaller side lobes – and in my experience, they often have these little raised dots that can make the leaves a little rough. But as the plants get older and send up their flower stalks, the upper leaves get smaller, without any lobes. These upper leaves have a pointed tip, and they have a clasp around the stem. That’s distinctively different than other mustards! When the flower buds open up, they are bright yellow and look like any other flower on a broccoli, kale, cabbage, or collard that’s gone to seed. The flowers are in a cluster and each flower has 4 bright yellow petals in a simple square. When field mustard is in flower, it’s easy to see – even driving on a highway at 60mph. Finding one good sized patch is like finding a $20 bill, there’s so much good eating! There’s no worry about harvesting too much, because in North America, it’s an introduced plant and in some states, it’s even classified as an invasive noxious weed! So harvest away! Once you recognize wild field mustard, you start to see it in a lot of disturbed areas in the late winter and early spring, even before it flowers. The plants won’t always be big, but there can be a lot of them in one spot. Field mustard is a common weed in many gardens, including my own - but that’s OK by me, because it means I have some good eating way before garden season even starts! And the harvest season is long, because I can harvest the big lower leaves, the flower stalks and the upper leaves, and even the flower buds and flowers. And – I can go back to the same plants and cut over and over and over again! So finding a patch of wild field mustard is really worth something and can provide a lot of food. Taking the field mustard back to the kitchen, we can be dealing several different parts of the plant. By treating each different part in its own way, we can get a real variety of food. I like to handle the big lower leaves separately. Here you can see their lobes really easily, and those dots and roughness on these lower leaves. There’s nothing wrong with those leaves – that’s the way they are supposed to be. If the center ribs are tough, I just strip them out like in my video on monster dandelion greens. On the other end of the plant are the flowers. You can see their buds and flowers look just like rapini or broccoli raab, or really like any of the other plants in the mustard family when they flower. Those flowers are delicate enough to keep in a separate container in the refrigerator, where they will last for a few days. Then, there’s the middle part of the plant – the flower stalk and the leaves and buds attached to it. I take the leaves off the flower stalks so I can use those stalks separately. I check to be sure the stalks are still tender, and not tough. The tops are just like rapini or broccoli raab - the thin, tiny broccoli that are on the menu at fancy restaurants. When it’s all the trimming done, I have at least 4 different parts of the wild field mustard that I can use in different ways – the big, coarse lower leaves, the tender flower stalks, the flowers, and the tops of the flower stalks with their unopened buds. The flowers are great in spring salads made out of weeds or leaves from the trees. I use the flower stalk tops just like rapini or little broccolis. I use the big leaves just like collards or turnip greens. Field mustard is not as sweet and mild as collard greens, but they’re NOT hot and spicy like garden mustard greens, either, - and - wild field mustard are not bitter, which some folks don’t like about other wild greens. I freeze the mustard greens in the same way that I freeze collard greens. The field mustard stalks are tasty in a lot of ways, but pickled mustard green stalks are incredibly good! My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 9150 Haphazard Homestead
5 Tips for Foraging Wild Edible Weeds in Your Neighborhood in the Spring
 
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I've got a lot of weeds to eat here at Haphazard Homestead. But every neighborhood has weeds, too. In this video, I go foraging in my neighborhood. I picked 12 different kinds of weeds that are great to eat and made some great cooked greens with bacon and onions. Then I give 5 tips for foraging in a neighborhood. The tips start at 13:50 in the video. Tip 1: Learn to identify a wild variety of wild plants that are good to eat. There are so many weeds and other wild plants that are great to eat! The more plants you know well, the easier and faster it will be to find enough for a great meal. Tip 2. Have a "Neighborhood foraging kit". A neighborhood kit doesn't have to be complicated because you are just in your neighborhood. In the spring, it's the simplest of all, because the big finds will be greens, leaves, flowers, and maybe, if you're lucky, mushrooms. My kit has a bunch of plastic bags, a couple jars, a few paper bags in case you find mushrooms, and a little knife for cutting some plants off under ground level. Tip 3: High-grade! Make it easy on yourself and pick the plants that are easy to pick clean, in good condition, and in enough quantity and concentration to make it worth your while. It's OK to leave a lot of plants behind. Tip 4: Be adaptable. You may be looking for one kind of plant, but find another. You may find plants in different condition than you expected. There are so many ways to use wild plants, especially wild greens. If you go with what you are finding, rather than having an inflexible agenda focused on a specific plant, then you will find more food, faster. Tip 5: Keep it simple when cooking wild greens. Don't over-think cooking greens in the kitchen. The proportions and kinds of greens aren't that important. What is important is to separate the plants into two categories: the ones that need to be par-boiled and the ones that can be boiled just once. Here are the plants in their order of appearance: 1. Wild Chives - Allium schoeneprasum 2. English Daisies - Bellis perennis 3. Wild field mustard flowers - Brassica rapa 4. Narrowleaf plantain - Plantago lanceolata 5. Curly Dock - Rumex crispus 6. Miner's Lettuce - Claytonia perfoliata 7. Chickweed - Stellaria media 8. Cat's-ear - Hypochaeris radicata 9. Nipplewort - Lapsana communis 10. Cleavers - Galium aparine 11. Common Sowthistle - Sonchus oleraceus 10. Dandelion leaves - Taraxacum officinale 11. Sheep sorrel - Rumex acetosella 12. Prickly Sowthistle - Sonchus asper Here's a springtime wild salad - It has over 20 different weeds, tree leaves, and flowers in it: https://youtu.be/GCwNlz7IDU0 Here's a video that shows basic cooking of 10 individual kinds of weeds, with a taste comparison: https://youtu.be/tKnM5m3KxFI My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Daily Beetle", "Carefree", "Fluffing a Duck", "Happy Alley" and "Casa Bossa Nova" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 7119 Haphazard Homestead
Cooking a Redbud Omelet: with Jerusalem Artichokes and Feral Chives
 
02:33
Redbud flowers are more than a salad garnish. They can be real food for regular people. Here, I use redbud flowers to top an open-faced omelet. This is a great recipe for using plants that all can take care of themselves: redbud, jerusalem artichokes, and chives. Redbud flowers are great on any omelet! Here's the general recipe, but it's highly adaptable: 1. Grate finely several Jerusalem artichokes, to make 1/2 - 3/4 cups 2. Chop chives, to make 1/4-1/3 cups 3. Beat 2-3 eggs 4. Fold in the Jerusalem artichokes and chives 5. Season with salt and pepper 6. Pour onto skillet on medium heat 7. Cook the omelet until nearly done 8. Top with 3/4-1 cup of redbud flowers 9. Take off the heat and eat! Redbud, Cercis canadensis, Family: Fabaceae Here's my video on foraging redbud flowers: https://youtu.be/rVaOnM8Jlds Here's my video on foraging and using chives: https://youtu.be/7nUirr-bEKM Here's my channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Here's my best wishes for you in all the foraging you do! Be sure to know what you are eating!
Views: 851 Haphazard Homestead
Will This Mushroom Make Me Sick? ID'ing Wild Meadow Mushrooms
 
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It finally started raining again, so there are fungus among us! I like to eat wild mushrooms. There are a couple patches of mushrooms that come up every fall here at my place, so I though you might like to play a game I call -- Will I Eat This, Or Not? Here's how the game goes. I will show some key features of these mushrooms that will allow you to mull over whether I will eat them or not. Then, I will go through the steps and thought process I use to identify the mushrooms and decide whether I will eat them or not. To identify these mushrooms, I am using 2 different keys, which are great tools for focusing on specific features of a mushroom and making "either-or" decisions that ultimately lead to figuring out what kind it is. To find out the general type of mushroom I've got, I use the inside cover from the book, "All That The Rain Promises and More", by David Aurora. To figure out the specific kind of mushroom I've got, once I know it's some sort of Agaricus, I use the "Trial Key of Common Agaricus Species of the Cnetral California Coast", by Fred Stevens. I have found this key to work well even where I live, in Oregon's Willamette Valley. The book I use in this video: All That the Rain Promises and More, by David Aurora. Ten Speed Press. The key to the Agaricus genus that I use in this video: Trial Key to Common Agaricus Species of the Central California Coast, by Fred Stevens. Available from the Mykoweb: http://www.mykoweb.com/misc/Agaricus_key.pdf The Mykoweb is a great resource for information about mushrooms and fungus! Check it out: http://www.mykoweb.com My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 29678 Haphazard Homestead
4 Reasons to Mulch Early Potatoes
 
03:29
I used some leftover dirt clods and leaf mulch to get my haphazard potato patch in good order. They provided four things that potatoes need. 1. Potatoes like loose soil with good air exchange. The mound of dirt clods left over from my haphazard planting got broken down into some nice, loose soil by the rain and changing temperatures. So I put that soil around the emerging potatoes. Than I put old leaves around the plants, too. I did that two different times as the potatoes got larger. The leaves help encourage worms to aerate the soil from down deep, where lots of potato roots are. 2. Potatoes like cool soil temperatures. The vines like temperatures of around 75 degrees Fahrenheit, but for good tuber set and growth, the potatoes like soil temperatures of about 55 degrees Fahrenheit. The leaf mulch helps keep the soil cool, while the vines can be warmed as the season progresses. 3. Potatoes like consistent soil moisture. The leaf mulch, especially because it is still wet from our winter rains, helps buffer against any short-term dry spells or unusually warm temperatures. The much cuts down on the water demand, too, as it reduces evaporation. 4. Potatoes tubers need to be protected from exposure to the sun. If the potato tubers get too much sun, they produce solanine, which is poisonous. (Note: the potatoes turn green, but the green is chlorophyll, not solanine, but that indicates that the tuber has been producing solanine.) Commercial potatoes are tested for solanine, but not homegrown potatoes. A deep leaf mulch provides plenty of space for the tubers to set and grown without being exposed to the sun. The leaf mulch has some bonus features, too. It helps a lot in keeping the weeds out of the potato patch. It improves the soil as worms break down the leaves over the summer. And the leaves sure look better than than that haphazard mess of a potato patch that I started off with! My video showing this early planting of the potatoes: https://youtu.be/9sJamDq5t_U Haphazard Homestead YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/HChrisH200
Views: 2169 Haphazard Homestead
Spring Wild Edible Salad - 18 Weeds, Trees and Flowers
 
09:00
Spring is such a great time for foraging and eating wild edible salads. In this salad, I've got 18 different plants -- some weeds, some trees, and some flowers. It's easy to make great wild edible salads once you know how to identify the plants. Here are three tips: (1) Pick clean. (2) Pick organized, so there's no contamination from plants that nobody should eat, and (3) Cut everything into small pieces. That really mixes the flavors of all the plants. Here are the plants: 1. Tulips - Tulipa spp. 2. Wild field mustard flowers - Brassica rapa 3. Apple flower petals - Malus spp. 4. Purple deadnettle - Lamium purpureum 5. Hop shoots - Humulus lupulus 6. Hedge mustard - Sisymbrium officinale 7. Arugula - Eruca sativa 8. American Elm seeds and leaves - Ulmus americana 9. Wild Lettuce - Lactuca serriola 10. Lemon Balm - Melissa officinalis 11. Hawthorn tree leaves - Crataegus spp. 12. Bittercress - Cardamine hirsuta 13. Nipplewort - Lapsana communis 14. Dandelion leaves and flowers - Taraxacum officinale 15. Tamarack needles - Larix laricina 16. Chickweed - Stellaria media 17. Cat's-ear - Hypochaeris radicata 18. English Daisy - Bellis perennis Here's another springtime wild salad - It has over 20 different weeds, tree leaves, and flowers in it: https://youtu.be/GCwNlz7IDU0 Here's another springtime wild salad, too, with 11 differetn weeds, tree leaves, and flowers: https://youtu.be/T0_txyx4pCM My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Daily Beetle", "Plain Loafer", "Vivacity", and "Hustle" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 2910 Haphazard Homestead
How to make elderberry flower pancakes
 
03:03
This video is about something I look forward to every year - pancakes made with fresh fllowers from the elderberry bush! Sometimes I make them in the kitchen adn other times when I'm out camping. Stripping all the flowers from the flowerheads gives me time to wax philosophical. So there's some irony that gets served up with theses pancakes, and here it is: You can't buy these fresh elderberry flowers, but if you have access to an elderberry bush in the wild or tucked away in your landscape, you can pick all the flowers you want - for free! I've got an earlier video about picking elderberry flowers and you may want to check out (see below). But enough of the philosophy, let's get to the kitchen. This is a simple recipe, with just 3 ingredients other than the fresh elder flowers. And all these ingredients are things that are easy to come by on a camping trip: eggs, flour, and left-over beer. I started with beating 2 eggs, adding 1 cup of flour, and then just balancing out the beer and elder flowers until I got the consistency I wanted for pancakes. You can use any pancake recipe that won't overpower the elder flowers. So, no buckwheat pancakes, no banana pancakes, and no pumpkin pie spice pancakes! The fresh elder flowers do keep well in the refrigerator for a couple days, so you can pick them one day and use them later. Some of the flowers get a little darker, but it doesn't matter. It also doesn't matter whether you make little pancakes or big pancakes. Just don't overpower the elder flower pancakes with a lot of complicated toppings. I'm just using simple maple syrup - real maple syrup! Let's get a live review: "That's a good breakfast! It tastes a lot like cattail pollen or pine pollen. Tasty!" I hope you get a chance to make some pancakes with fresh flowers from the black elderberry, the common elderberry, or the blue elder. It is so worth the effort! These three kinds of elderberry bushes are just out there growing on their own, anyway. The flowers just have to be harvested! I hope things are going well at your place. Please feel free to comment, or share this video. If this is your first time to my channel, I'd love to have you subscribe so you don't miss out on all the other goings on here at Haphazard Homestead. Thanks for watching! Elderberry: Sambucus nigra Common Elderberry: Sambucus nigra subspp. candadensis Blue Elder: Sambucus nigra subspp. cerulea Black Elderberry: Sambucus nigra My video on picking and using elderberry flowers: https://youtu.be/TiaTrbVcDB0 My playlist on foraging wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My playlist on homestead cooking: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAOiHxDZ-kYltFC4L9DPafT My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 1189 Haphazard Homestead
Foraging in My Yard: Wild Salad from 24 Plants of Late Spring & Early Summer
 
18:14
If you have some of these common wild plants, weeds, and trees in your yard, you could be eating an incredibly delicious wild salad, too. I forage 24 plants from my yard. Then I show you how I turn them into an amazing salad with a wild salad dressing, too. Even though spring is the easiest time for foraging a wild salad, there are still plenty of great wild edible plants to eat as late spring heads into summer. The plants in order of appearance: 1. Common sowthistle - Sonchus oleraceus 2. Grand fir - Abies grandis 3. Spearmint - Mentha spicata 4. Wild field mustard - Brassica rapa 5. Wild garlic - Allium vineale 6. Chickweed - Stellaria media 7. Black locust - Robinia pseudoacacia 8. Sheep sorrel - Rumex acetosella 9. Blue Spruce - Picea pungens 10. Trailing blackberry - Rubus ursinis 11. Nipplewort - Lapsana communis 12. Cleavers - Galium aparine 13. Oregon grape - Mahonia aquifolium 14. Western Larch - Larix occidentalis 15. Dandelion - Taraxacum officinale 16. Common hawthorn - Crateagus monogyna 17. English daisy - Bellis perennis 18. Hedge mustard - Sisymbrium officinale 19. Curly dock - Rumex crispus 20. Bristly hawksbeard - Crepis setosa 21. Lemon balm - Melissa officinalis 22. White clover - Trifolium repens 23. American elm - Ulmus americana 24. Bittercress - Cardamine hirsuta Here are some tips for making a great wild salad: 1. Focus on plants that are in good condition. 2. Pick clean. Look through what you pick, as you are picking it. leave the grass, pieces of other plants, and poor-quality plant parts out in the field. 3. Pick organized - and keep everything organized until you've double-checked it all, back in the kitchen 4. Chop the plants into tiny pieces 5. Keep some of the wild flowers aside, to mix into the chopped greens. It all looks nicer that way. 6. Use a simple salad dressing. Let the taste of all those wild plants shine. A simple oil and vinegar mix works fine! If you enjoy foraging wild plants, here's my playlist - Foraging: Real Food for Regular People If you want to eat what you forage, here are playlists about preparing your harvests: Cooking Wild Greens - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDsPNTAOuzlyBCCcKTvsF6L Wild Salads - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDPp18Eo0HbMT8x3FvGhBhY If you like to garden, too, here are my gardening playlists: Potatoes - An easy and productive garden crop - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjASbYda3uBGHFH57edZLEYQ Elephant Garlic: How to get the most out of growing Elephant Garlic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjD6dEWNXksaTcnAbkS1kV7v Collards: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Collard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBIqUqGKeLPykAxctUzkjHs Hops: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Hop Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjCCTnFEJA5-dw6TcrrHVhUY In the Garden - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW Here are my playlists about specific wild plants: Dandelions - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC0D-X7QcfJGzY9wE5vw3lp Wild Mustard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBY1bhUcZwxVzymmyt18ndx Elderberry - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDPDOVvA1P8txESkgYB8T0i Spruce Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBd5rDAN-0X9fjHsw-GETmr Redbud Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBkw17z9Y_PiBoLE-mwuROF Detailed ID of Wild Mushrooms - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjA-FB7HpMdpXMfI0SaiyYon ------------- My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA ------------------------ Music: "Fireflies and Stardust", "Garden Music", "Hep Cats", "Lobby Time" and "Marty Gots a Plan" - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #eatflowers #HaphazardHomestead
Views: 9025 Haphazard Homestead
Red Pontiac Potatoes - A review of lunker potatoes from garden to table
 
02:16
There are so many good potatoes, really different potatoes, to grow. Do you want to grow some lunker spuds -- really big potatoes? Consider growing Red Pontiac potatoes. This video will help you get to know the Red Pontiac Potato. I planted my Red Pontiacs to be storage potatoes, to use in the winter. So I aimed to plant them in early June. But I was a couple weeks late. Red Pontiacs are known for producing lunkers, these giant tubers. They are really fun to find in the ground. I might have gotten some of the tiny tubers to size up better, if I had planted earlier. But all-in-all, I was pretty happy with the results. I got 18 pounds of potatoes from the two pounds I started with. Red Pontiacs are known for their good storage qualities. And these potatoes did hold up well. Here they are after more than five months in storage. They lost a little moisture, but they haven't sprouted at all. Red Pontiacs make good mashed potatoes, but my favorite water to use them is in potato salad. You can see why here. These are just boiled until they are tender. Look how they hold together. When a potato catalog description says a potatoe variety is "waxy", this is what they are talking about. Look how they hold together even when they are sliced. I'm not going to review every potato I grow, but the Red Pontiac deserves its own video. It's a good potato! What's your favorite potato? Purple Potatoes: A review of Magic Molly potatoes: https://youtu.be/sq4RRT0Ul6Y Planting pre-sprouted potatoes in early spring: https://youtu.be/9sJamDq5t_U Four reasons to mulch early potatoes: https://youtu.be/KFn9y7EtBSg Using potatoes to break new ground: https://youtu.be/ehCiBrfb5Z4 My gardening playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #gardening #potatoes #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Americana" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 580 Haphazard Homestead
Bittercress! Eat More Weeds!
 
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Bittercress is a common weed that can provide real food for regular people. Bittercress goes by a lot of other common names, including peppercress, peppergrass, winter cress, and land cress. These names are also used for other weeds, but they are all edible and can be used in the same way. This video shows three 'haphazard' ways to eat bittercress. They aren't fancy, but they get the job done! 1. As a topping for a leftover sweet potato. 2. As part of an apple-cheese sandwich. 3. As a topping for an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. As a topping, bittercress is best raw. But watch for future videos where bittercress is cooked as part of a pot of mixed greens. Do less, get more! Let your grass grow and eat more weeds! Bittercress: Cardamine hirsuta. Family: Brassicacae. The Youtube channel "Identify That Plant" has a good bittercress identification video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ELs-QiTMtk
Views: 4517 Haphazard Homestead
Eating Garden Weeds: How-to Tips
 
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I eat a lot of weeds. In this video, I go over 2 key strategies for picking weeds to eat from a garden. I throw in a few helpful tips along the way, too. The first strategy works best when you have one kind of weed that is taking over and trying to dominate the garden. When I was rehabilitating one of my blueberry patches this spring, I found one plant that is a persistent problem, was prevalent, and was prime for picking. That weed was one of the wild geraniums, Dovesfoot Geranium. So that's the weed I keyed in on. I picked a nice mess of wild geranium leaves, and added in a few others that I have a hard time resisting when I find them: plantain, cleavers, and dock. Here's a tip for using this strategy: Even though you may pull all the weeds, you don't have to keep all of them for the kitchen. Choose only the best to eat. The second strategy works best when there's a mix of different plants, mostly at their young, tender, and mildest-tasting stage. This strategy is to pick a wide variety of weeds, even though no one kind will be enough for a meal. This strategy takes more mental effort, to look at each plant and decide what it is and whether to keep it for the kitchen. Here are some tips for this strategy: 1. Keep your picking organized, to make it easier in the kitchen to confirm you only have the edible plants, and to make it easier if different plants need different methods of preparation like blanching with a change of water. 2. Try to pick clean, without a lot of plant material you will have to sort through and throw out in the kitchen. Plants in the garden will have more dirt on them than wild ones in the tall grass. So be sure to wash them well! 3. Use this time to really get to know your weeds and be able to identify the edible weeds out in the wild, away from the garden. 4. Don't feel like you have to keep all the weeds. Don't pick the ones that have been stepped on in the garden or that are stressed. Keep only the best ones for the kitchen. I hope you take the time to looks closely at the weeds in your garden and really learn which ones are good to eat, and enjoy them! And then you enjoy, even more, having a weed-free garden. Dovesfoot Geranium: Geranium molle, Family Geraniaceae To see more on picking, processing, and cooking with wild geranium, see these videos: Homestead Haul #2: https://youtu.be/uBassTKPwsw Homestead Haul #3: https://youtu.be/tKnM5m3KxFI Cooking with wild geranium: https://youtu.be/QLvEnSakSCw My playlist on foraging wild edibles: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My playlist on cooking, which includes a lot of weeds: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAOiHxDZ-kYltFC4L9DPafT My YouTube channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA
Views: 2730 Haphazard Homestead
Why chit? Planting pre-sprouted potatoes in early spring
 
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Why do some people chit their potatoes before planting? There are three reasons for chitting potatoes. (1) Potatoes that are stored for use as next year's planting stock are kept in conditions that promote deep dormancy, like a deep sleep. Especially if you are planting potatoes in the early spring, when growth may be slowed by cold temperatures, it can be helpful to chit the potatoes to 'wake them up' out of that deep dormancy. (2) Chitting changes the physiological "age" of a potato, and that "age" will affect the vigor of growth and tuber set. Potatoes that are too "young", that is, just recently harvested, won't sprout readily. But after being kept cold and then brought into warm conditions makes the potato "older". When the chitted potatoes have sprouts no longer than about an inch (25mm), they will grow vigorously and will be more likely to have larger tubers. But if the sprouts are allowed to grow longer and become branched and weak, then the potatoes get "old"; they will set more tubers, but each will be small. Note that cutting a potato into pieces also "ages" the tuber and affects its future growth. Knocking sprouts off the potato also ages the tuber. So, doing several things that can "age" your tubers can make them senile and not so productive. (3) Chitting is fun! Look at them! It makes a potato even funnier than it already is. In late February 2015, I was in a rush around the Haphazard Homestead because I had to leave town for awhile. So I needed to get my chitted tubers into the ground before their sprouts got too long and over-aged the tubers! Potatoes aren't complicated to plant. A lot of folks will say that if you cut your potatoes into pieces, you should let them cure -- or sit in a warm area until the cuts have dried some. But I planted my mine immediately. It was more important to get them out into the ground! So that's what I did, with the help of Klutzy Gardener. (Addendum: every single one of the potatoes has sprouted and is growing now, a month after planting.) For more information about how chitting affects the growth of potatoes see the following: - http://labs.russell.wisc.edu/organic-seed-potato/tag/chitting/ - http://www.uaex.edu/publications/PDF/FSA-6016.pdf - http://cipotato.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/cipp5w5.pdf Happy potato growing! Music: "Hustle" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 1318 Haphazard Homestead
Picking Hedge Mustard: with cooking tips
 
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Sometimes I like to focus on picking a big mess of wild Hedge Mustard, Sisymbrium officinale. In this video, I pick a big mess of wild Hedge Mustard and process it to get it ready for cooking. I show some tips for picking and processing it. I show some ways that I eat wild Hedge Mustard, too. My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #wildmustard #VEDA #SSSVEDA #HaphazardHomestead Music: "Carpe Diem" and "Daily Beetle" by, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Views: 1511 Haphazard Homestead
Eat Black Locust Flowers: Deep Fried and Delicious
 
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I use black locust flowers a lot! They are a great wild edible. Deep fried black locust flowers are especially good -- almost too good! Black locust flowers are so full of flavor -- so full of floral perfume and sweetness. Deep-fried black locust flowers are a real treat. And they are so easy! This video starts with a grove of black locust trees. The flowers are in perfect condition. I pick some flowers, bunch by bunch. I let them sit awhile and shake them, too, to give insects a chance to escape. Then I shake them again before I cook them! In the kitchen, I stir up a simple, thin batter, like a tempura batter -- just white flour and water. The goal is to have a batter that won't over-power the sweet flavor of the flowers. I want just a thin coating on the flowers -- not too thin, not too thick, but just right. I don't worry about having too much better, because I use that for black locust flower pancakes. They are delicious, too, but there are some definite tricks to cook them right. When the batter is ready, I dip a cluster of black locust flowers into it, and let then batter drain off a bit. There's shouldn't be a lot on the flowers, just a thin coating. Then I drop that flower cluster into hot oil. It's fine to use whatever kind you prefer! I set my deep fryer at 350F or a little higher. It takes a few minutes for the flowers to cook to uniform, light brown. It's good to turn them over at least once. Don't walk off and forget them! When the fried black locust flowers are a uniform light brown, take them out of the oil and lay them on a towel or a paper towel. I keep them in a warm oven, so they stay warm and crispy while I'm cooking a whole batch. Deep fried black locust flowers are great with powdered sugar on them. I topped this batch with some warm honey steeped with finely chopped rose petals. This is such a special treat! Especially served with spearmint tea and fresh rhubarb. If a restaurant or bakery made these, they wouldn't be able to keep up with the demand! I hope you get to enjoy Black Locust flowers sometime! Black Locust: Robinia pseudoacacia ------------------- Music: "Lobby Time" and "Marty Gots a Plan" - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ My playlist on foraging for wild foods: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBHba1wyw5WWkAu49RoB_-X My channel: Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA #wildfood #eatyouryard #eatwild #foraging #eatflowers #HaphazardHomestead
Views: 955 Haphazard Homestead
Will This Mushroom Make Me Sick? # 3 - ID'ing Wild Meadow Mushrooms
 
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There are so many different kinds of meadow mushrooms. Some of them are edible - and super delicious! But others contain poisons that are toxic to eat. Which kind of mushroom are these? Join me in another close up look at wild mushrooms -- and play the game "Will This Mushroom Make Me Sick?" Here's how the game goes. I will show some key features of these mushrooms that will allow you to mull over whether I will eat them or not. Then, I will go through the steps and thought process I use to identify the mushrooms and decide whether I will eat them or not. To identify these mushrooms, I am using 2 different keys, which are great tools for focusing on specific features of a mushroom and making "either-or" decisions that ultimately lead to figuring out what kind it is. To find out the general type of mushroom I've got, I use the inside cover from the book, "All That The Rain Promises and More", by David Aurora. To figure out the specific kind of mushroom I've got, once I know it's some sort of Agaricus, I use the "Trial Key of Common Agaricus Species of the Cnetral California Coast", by Fred Stevens. I have found this key to work well even where I live, in Oregon's Willamette Valley. --------------------------- The book I use in this video: All That the Rain Promises and More, by David Aurora. Ten Speed Press. The key to the Agaricus genus that I use in this video: Trial Key to Common Agaricus Species of the Central California Coast, by Fred Stevens. Available from the Mykoweb: http://www.mykoweb.com/misc/Agaricus_key.pdf The Mykoweb is a great resource for information about mushrooms and fungus! Check it out: http://www.mykoweb.com --------------------------- My playlist on Mushroom Identification is the Series, "Will I Eat This or Not?" - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjA-FB7HpMdpXMfI0SaiyYon If you want to improve your foraging skills, here's my playlist - Foraging: Real Food for Regular People - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW If you want to eat what you forage, here are playlists about preparing your harvests: Cooking Wild Greens - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDsPNTAOuzlyBCCcKTvsF6L Wild Salads - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDPp18Eo0HbMT8x3FvGhBhY Here are my playlists about specific wild plants: Dandelions - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC0D-X7QcfJGzY9wE5vw3lp Wild Mustard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBY1bhUcZwxVzymmyt18ndx Elderberry - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjDPDOVvA1P8txESkgYB8T0i Spruce Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBd5rDAN-0X9fjHsw-GETmr Pine Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjAUzXslTTRRtOtvxXnP04pg Redbud Trees - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBkw17z9Y_PiBoLE-mwuROF ------------------------------- If you like to garden, too, here are my gardening playlists: Potatoes - An easy and productive garden crop - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjASbYda3uBGHFH57edZLEYQ Elephant Garlic: How to get the most out of growing Elephant Garlic - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjD6dEWNXksaTcnAbkS1kV7v Collards: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Collard Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjBIqUqGKeLPykAxctUzkjHs Hops: How To Grow and Use ALL of Your Hop Plants - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjCCTnFEJA5-dw6TcrrHVhUY In the Garden - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEGN8kE_KnjC46uuOaLL0UtCV0TUQXzbW Here's my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HaphazardHomestead --------------------------------- Music: "Garden Music" - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ------------------
Views: 1155 Haphazard Homestead
Hops: How to Pickle Hop Shoots
 
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I picked the young shoots of my hops this spring. I ate a lot of them, but I made some great pickles, too -- hop shoot pickles! Hop shoot pickles taste great straight from the jar, in salads, on sandwiches, and as a side. They are so easy to make -- only four ingredients besides the hop shoots and no cooking! Here's my recipe: Hop shoots: 1/2 pound Garlic: 1 large clove Peppercorns: 1 and 1/2 teaspoons Beer: 5 ounces of a belgian-style pale ale Vinegar: 2 and 1.2 cups of white vinegar Clean the hop shoots really well! Put them in a quart mason jar. Add the garlic clove and peppercorns. Add the beer and vinegar. Cap the jar with a non-corrosive lid or put plastic wrap under the lid. Let the jar sit in a cool, dark place for 2 weeks to a month. Enjoy! Wasn't that easy? It's probably a good idea to put them in the refrigerator after they have turned into pickles. But I didn't -- I just ate them all within a couple months. How did I use my pickled hop shoots? I ate a lot of them straight from the jar. They have a strong garlic and peppercorn flavor that is just great! They go great with a tray of cheese or other savory snacks. They provide a nice little kick in a salad and on a sandwich. They are a good compliment to fish or BBQ. But I think the absolute best way to eat pickled hop shoots is with raw lambs quarter leaves. That is absolutely delicious! They go together perfectly! Check out my video on how to identify and pick lambs quarter: https://youtu.be/OZDY1uR2ZSc My channel is Haphazard Homestead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA This video was NOT sponsored by anyone, but here are some helpful links about pickled hop shoots: The Tasting Table website's Pickled Hop Shoot Recipe: http://www.tastingtable.com/recipe/pickled_hops_recipe_tastingtable.pdf The Food52 website's Pickled Hop Shoot Recipe: https://food52.com/recipes/21805-pickled-hop-shoots A place to buy pickled hop shoots: http://www.hopsdirect.com/pickled-hop-shoots/ #hops #pickledhops #hopshoots #picklerecipes #hopshootrecipes #humulus #humuluslupulus
Views: 1331 Haphazard Homestead
100 subscriber giveaway  -- to the foodbank!
 
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As a way of saying thank you to all my subscribers, I'm picking one pound of produce, from here on the homestead, for each subscriber and donating it to my local foodbank. I'm picking two kinds of plums (Shiro and Methley) and collards! Well it looks like I have 117 subscribers right now, so it's good that I ended up picking 120 total pounds of produce from the homestead to donate to my local foodbank. Thanks to all my subscribers and to everyone who leaves comments on my videos! The yellow plum: Shiro The red plum: Methley The collards: Flash My channel: Haphazard Homestead https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcZCvPPU9dgxD0yXrc9DaPA Music: "Carefree" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 379 Haphazard Homestead

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