Home
Videos uploaded by user “NASA Langley's Technology Gateway”
NASA | Control and Tracking of Airborne Wind Energy Systems
 
02:20
At NASA Langley Research Center, engineers have developed new hardware and software to track and control airborne wind energy systems. NASA seeks to create partnerships that will move technologies from the laboratory to the marketplace, where those innovations can benefit society the most. Please visit our website http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/ to find our more.
NASA | EBF3 - Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication
 
04:16
Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and wire to fabricate metallic structures. The process efficiencies of the electron beam and the solid wire feedstock make the EBF3 process attractive for use in-space.
NASA | Fiber Optic Shape Sensing Technology
 
04:20
NASA Langley Research Center has demonstrated a patented method and apparatus for determining the position, in three dimensions, of any point on an optical fiber. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market the following technology. License rights may be issued on an exclusive or nonexclusive basis and may include specific fields of use. For more information, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/docs/TOA_LaRC93_ShapeSensing_10web.pdf
NASA | Advanced Thermoplastic Tape and Composites Processing Method
 
01:29
NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Compact Vibration Control System
 
02:08
NASA Langley Research Center has developed a point sensor and piezoelectric actuator system to actively sense and reduce vibrations in flexible structures. Miniature accelerometers sense vibration and feed signals to control circuits that condition and amplify the signal. Interdigitated electrodes in the actuator apply an in-plane voltage differential across the piezoelectric material, causing compressive stress contrary to the vibration of the structure. This active damping system can reduce vibrations in aircraft windows, thereby reducing cabin noise, or help stabilize large, flexible space structures. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov//docs/TOA_LaRC114_VibrateControlSystem_5_web.pdf
NASA | Extreme Reduced Instruction Set Computing (xRISC)
 
02:03
NASA Langley Research Center has developed a software capable of faster, complex processing for a wide range of applications from image processing to equipment backup. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market the following technology. License rights may be issued on an exclusive or nonexclusive basis and may include specific fields of use. For more information, please visit:http://technologygateway.nasa.gov
NASA | New Photogrammetry System
 
01:41
NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Fabrication of Fiber-Metal Laminates with Non-Autoclave Processes
 
01:34
A new technique developed by NASA enables the preparation of metal/composite hybrid laminates, also known as fibermetal laminates (FML), through a one-step processing method. Currently FMLs are prepared by a compression process using a press or autoclave with metallic layers sandwiched between layers of glass or graphite prepreg (preimpregnated fibers with a matrix resin). NASA's process essentially eliminates the need to produce prepreg prior to the production of a hybrid laminate. It also allows the production of large, net shape structures that were previously not possible with autoclave or press technologies due to size constraints. Essentially, it involves an infusion process whereby matrix resin transversely infiltrates fiber layers that have been sandwiched between plies of metal foil containing flow pathways to produce a metal/composite hybrid laminate. The infiltration can be accomplished using pressure (resin transfer molding [RTM]), or a vacuum induced pressure differential (vacuum assisted resin transfer molding [VARTM]). NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer with Mulifunctional Fibrous Electrodes
 
01:29
NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | RP46
 
04:30
RP-46 is a state-of-the-art high-temperature resin, developed as a more environmentally friendly alternative to currently used resins. It is relatively inexpensive and can easily be processed into a high-quality graphite-fiber-reinforced material.
NASA Langley's Compact Active Vibration Control System Webinar
 
43:38
To suppress structural vibration in flexible aerospace structures, researchers at NASA Langley invented a piezoelectric actuator system that enables simple analog feedback control to actively reduce vibrations. Besides numerous aerospace applications, the system can be useful in any application where compact size is important and you want to reduce vibration, such as manufacturing, electronics, optics, medical equipment, and more. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market the following technology. License rights may be issued on an exclusive or nonexclusive basis and may include specific fields of use. For more information about this technology and other NASA technologies available for licensing, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA LaRC-Si/Medtronic
 
03:54
An aerospace material invented at NASA may soon help people with heart problems. In the early 1990s, while developing new insulation materials for high-speed aircraft at Langley Research Center, a chemist invented a product with very novel features. LaRC-Si can now be found in a variety of commercial products, and for the first time it's being used in a medical application.
NASA | Electroactive Polymer Fibers for Structural Health Monitoring
 
01:29
NASA Langley has created a modified electrospinning apparatus for spinning highly aligned polymer fibers. Fiber placement, orientation, and porosity are difficult to control using conventional electrospinning apparatus. Conventional electrospinning creates randomly oriented fibers that are well suited to nonwoven mats, but not to other applications. Now, NASA Langley has developed the capability to control the alignment and porosity of fibers for mats, which will broaden the range of engineering applications of electrospun materials to include new tissue engineering scaffolds, membrane filters, textiles, and embedded sensors and actuators. The new apparatus provides a simple and inexpensive means of producing fibers and mats of controlled fiber diameter, porosity, and thickness. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/docs/TOA_LARC04_AlignElectroNano_16web.pdf
NASA | Quick Change Ceramic Flame Holder
 
01:32
Seeking to improve upon stock stainless steel flame holders, researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center have developed a new ceramic design with a service temperature of 4,000°F. The combination of high strength and high temperature capability and a twist lock mounting method to the steel burner sets this flame holder apart from existing technology. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Ultrasonic Inspection System for Nondestructive Evaluation
 
01:44
NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | SansEC
 
03:02
One of the 100 most innovative ideas of 2008, according to R&D Magazine, "SansEC Geometric Sensing Patterns" are the simplest, completely functional circuits that can be manufactured today. Unlike other sensors, a SansEC sensor can be designed for measurements unrelated to each other - like temperature and fluid level - and can easily switch from one measurement to another or do both simultaneously. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | SansEC (longer version)
 
09:39
What appears as an electrically open circuit is a completely functional sensing circuit that uses a geometric pattern in lieu of assembling a collection of electrical components via electrical connections. A unique feature achieved by eliminating electrical connections is that there is no single point on the circuit -- An Achilles Point - that if damaged prevents the sensor from being powered and interrogated. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | SansEC - A New Dimension to Sensing
 
01:10
For more information about this NASA Langley Technology, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov
NASA | Game and Simulation Control
 
01:34
NASA's Langley Research Center has developed a technology at the forefront of a new generation of computer and video game environments that train valuable mental skills, beyond eye-hand coordination, for the personal improvement, not just the diversion, of the user. This technology is derived from previous research focused on automatic adaptation of flight deck controls based on user feedback. Monitoring and enhancement of operator state is an objective of the current LaRC Intelligent Integrated Flight Deck Technology (IIFDT) program. Prior research by the inventor, Alan Pope, modulate (based on player physiological signals) the manual inputs that a player makes to the buttons or joysticks of a video game hand controller. However, a new type of controller allows a player to make inputs to a video game by moving the entire controller itself, allowing the present invention's entirely new approach to integrating psychophysiological signals into game play. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/docs/TOA_LARC102_GameSimulastion_8web%20New.pdf
NASA Langley's  Holey Graphene Technology Webinar
 
45:17
This webinar, presented on September 6, 2017 by Lead inventors Yi Lin and John Connell, describes "Holey Graphene," an improved graphene materal that is available for licensing from NASA Langley Research Center. For more information please contact: [email protected]
NASA | New Method for Pitot-Static Calibration
 
01:42
NASA Langley has developed a new method for calibrating pitot-static air data systems used in aircraft. Pitot-static systems are pressure-based instruments that measure the aircraft's airspeed. These systems must be calibrated in flight to minimize potential error. Current methods that include trailing cone, tower fly-by, and pacer airplane are time- and cost-intensive, requiring extensive flight time per calibration. NASA's method can reduce this calibration time by up to an order of magnitude, cutting a significant fraction of the cost. In addition, NASA's calibration method enables near real-time monitoring of error in airspeed measurements, which can be used to alert pilots when airspeed instruments are inaccurate or failing. Because of this feature, the technology also has applications in the health usage and monitoring (HUMS) industry. Flight test engineers can be trained to use this method proficiently in 1--2 days without costly specialized hardware. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://bit.ly/pitot-static_calibration_method
NASA | Lightning Protection System for Aerospace Vehicles
 
01:54
A unique sensor created by researchers at NASA Langley can be used for a variety of applications, including lighting protection and detection. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA/Penske LTOC
 
02:17
NASA's Langley Research Center scientists developed a family of catalysts for low- temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and other gases. Originally designed as part of an atmospheric satellite project, where the catalysts were intended to recycle and recapture carbon dioxide to enhance the operational life of carbon dioxide lasers, the entire system was made to be rugged, long-lived, and fail-safe. Although the satellite project was never launched, the resulting catalysts are doing great things here on Earth, with current applications in the high-speed motor sports arena as air purifiers, so professional racecar drivers do not get carbon monoxide poisoning. Future benefits may extend even further.
NASA | Advanced Actuators and Transducers
 
01:54
Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have produced an advanced electro-active materials based transducer that can harvest orders of magnitude more energy in a given application than traditional solutions, yielding more power to drive devices and store in batteries. In a complementary effort, researchers have also produced the first hybrid actuator or HYBAS system, with both an electroactive polymer and an electroactive ceramic that achieves enhanced displacement performance from a single power supply, greatly reducing electrical consumption while simultaneously improving mechanical displacement compared to current state-of-the-art actuators. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market the following technology. License rights may be issued on an exclusive or nonexclusive basis and may include specific fields of use. For more information, please visit:http://technologygateway.nasa.gov
NASA | Crimp Tool for Safe and Efficient Critical Wiring Needs
 
01:43
NASA Langley researchers have developed an enhanced crimp tool that provides real-time verification of wire-crimp integrity while the crimp is being formed. The tool nondestructively tests crimp connection quality in aircraft and other critical wiring systems. Modern commercial aircraft rely on thousands of crimped wire terminations for critical communication, navigation, control, and electrical power distribution systems. Wiring crimp failures can be a threat to aircraft safety and may lead to a loss of critical functions or an onboard fire. In addition to the safety concerns, diagnosing and repairing poor crimp connections is costly. By enabling an efficient way to directly test all crimps as they are made, the new tool improves quality control and reduces the risks of failure. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Fail Safe Composite Structure
 
01:38
The NASA Langley-developed system provides bothstructural support and thermal protection attributes in a "fail safe" manner. This innovation incorporates the use of a PCP composite structure that when overheated or exposed to fire or plasma will convert to a ceramic matrix composite (CMC), retaining structural integrity and still functioning effectively. When damage causes the thermal protection system (TPS) to fail, the underlying PCP structure converts to a CMC material that has high-temperature structural properties, will not catch fire or melt, and continues to perform its structural function. The system can be used in a variety of vehicles and static structures, such as incorporation into a building to keep it structurally sound during a fire. Used in a re-entry heat shield, it costs less to produce than current heat shield systems. The technology also has applicability to engines in general aviation aircraft, turbines, automobiles, or other ground vehicles. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Method of Depositing Metal Nanoparticles
 
02:01
NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity please visit: technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA Langley's Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters Webinar
 
34:09
If we told you there’s a way to build piezoelectric energy harvesters that can produce more than ten-times the power output of commercial devices vibrating at the same frequency, would you believe us? It’s true! The key is to integrate stacks of polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate Pb(Zr,Ti)03 (PZT) ceramic in design concepts that amplify your input forces, resulting in higher efficiency. And we’ll show you two ways to do that. These two new energy harvesters can produce more than ten times the power output capable from commercial devices at the same level of vibration. Not only that, the ability to couple more mechanical energy with the piezoelectric materials allowed both devices to operate more effectively in the resonance mode and at off-resonance frequencies than anything currently on the market. But don’t take our word for it. Come see for yourself.
NASA | Zeroing Out Negative Effects (ZONE) Biofeedback Training
 
01:32
ZONE is an innovative method for improving athletes' responses to stress, anxiety, and loss of concentration during competition. In the training environment, when the user successfully attains an optimal target state of psychophysiological functioning, the technology informs and/or rewards that user through real-time physical changes in the athletic equipment. For example, in the training setting, a golfer can work toward optimal concentration in the act of putting, leading to improved performance in real situations. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Technology Gateway
 
03:36
An introduction To NASA Langley Research Center's Technology Gateway. NASA seeks to create partnerships that will move technologies from the laboratory to the marketplace, where those innovations can benefit society the most. Please visit our website http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/ to find our more.
NASA | Ground Facilities and Testing Directorate (GFTD)
 
05:09
NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) represents one of the largest collections of aeronautical research testing capabilities in the world. The center addresses a broad range of ground test requirements for both atmospheric and planetary flight vehicles with several major aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, acoustic, hypersonic air breathing propulsion, and structural testing facilities.
NASA | 3-D Super Resolution Algorithm for LIDAR Image Enhancement
 
02:11
NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Forward Voltage Short Pulse Technique for Measuring Temperature of Laser Diode Junctions
 
01:32
NASA Langley Research Center has developed a new technology for measuring the junction temperature of laser diode arrays (LDAs) that can support dramatically improved LDA fault analysis and lifetime estimates. This technology provides better spatial and temporal resolution than spectral chirp or thermal imaging methods and can be integrated into existing LDA systems, such as laser diode drivers, without significant additional costs (including weight, power, and space). Potential applications include quality control and screening of LDAs for maximum lifetime, optimizing development of operational parameters, or providing real-time operational diagnostics/prognostics. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA Langley's Radiation Protection Technology Webinar
 
29:33
This webinar, presented on January 24, 2017 by Dr. D Laurence Thomsen III and Kimberly Graupner, describes "Z-Shielding for Radiation Protection," a technology available for licensing from NASA Langley Research Center. Please contact us for more information! Email: [email protected]
NASA | Space Utilization Optimization Tool
 
01:45
NASA Langley Research Center has developed a space allocation and planning software system to allow for more effective and efficient facility usage. It also provides a customizable strategy for organizing personnel and project teams to maximize productivity and synergies among employees. Cost- reduction solutions are suggested based on organizational input constraints related to the facility. The program uses a standard web browser to allow for visualization of entire organizations down to individual rooms. The planning tool is based on algorithms that were developed using ArcGIS software and Visual Basic codes, which enable evaluation of different space management scenarios in real time. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA Langley Research Center - Taking Nanotechnology to the Next Level
 
04:18
To become a leader in the nanotechnology field, Langley has built state-of-the-art laboratories and assembled a highly skilled team of researchers. To find out more about our capabilities, please contact us through our website http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | From the Skies to the Farm
 
01:58
Farming is hard work, but thanks to a technology that had its origins in NASA, a farmer's life can be easier and more profitable.
NASA | Lunar Surface Manipulation System
 
01:15
NASA Langley Research Center offers a novel lifting and precision positioning device with hybrid functional characteristics of both crane-type lifting devices and robotic manipulators. The design of the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS) allows for fine positioning with complete control over both translation and rotation of the payload. In addition, the design permits several other operations using a wide variety of special purpose tools, such as a bucket, pallet forks, grappling devices, sensor and visualization packages, and dexterous robotic arms that can be quickly added to the tip. NASA is seeking development partners and potential licensees. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/docs/TOA_LaRC86_LMS_6web.pdf
NASA | New Surface Modification Techniques
 
01:55
NASA's Langley researchers offer you methods for particle contamination mitigation. The methods were developed for exploration of surfaces such as Moon, Mars, and asteroids. During past missions, lunar dust caused an array of issues including compromised seals, clogged filters, abraded visors and space suit surfaces, and was a significant health concern. NASA's novel methods for particle contamination mitigation include both controlled chemical and topographical modifications. These methods offer a wealth of applications and commercial opportunities. The benefits include films, coatings, and surface treatments with antifouling, dust resistance, hydrophobic to superhydrophic, low adhesion/friction, and self-cleaning characteristics. NASA is seeking development partners. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Synthetic Vision System for Aeronautical Applications (3D Flight Display)
 
01:32
NASA Langley has developed a synthetic 3D visualization flight display, which presents flight data information in an intuitive way using 3D computer graphic capabilities. The flight crew can preview and rehearse flight maneuvers in a realistic environment. The display also provides an unimpeded visualization of the surrounding environment in the case of inclement weather, enabling safer flying conditions. Flight crews can rewind/fast forward/pause to certain areas of an approach or go-around and discuss abort strategies or point out dangerous terrain. New pilots can safely train on upcoming flights because of the intuitive and easy-to-follow technology. Seasoned pilots will notice the current paper chart arrangement but with information presented in a quickly interpretable manner. Flight crews can use the technology as a refresher for destinations less frequently traveled. The technology is widely applicable for civilian, military, and even unmanned flights. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA | Compact Long-Reach Robotic Arm
 
01:54
At NASA Langley Research Center, engineers have developed a lightweight and compact arm with improved mechanical advantage and efficiency in single plane applications. NASA seeks to create partnerships that will move technologies from the laboratory to the marketplace, where those innovations can benefit society the most. Please visit our website http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/ to find our more.
NASA | Durable Joining Technology for Uniformly-Curved Composite Sandwich Structures
 
01:34
NASA Langley has developed a new adhesively bonded joint concept for curved and flat panel sandwich architectures. A woven preform, inserted into the seam between sandwich panels, provides a larger total bonding area and multiple load paths for an improved distribution of load through the joint. NASA is able to create structures by joining sections of sandwich panels or curved shells. The new joint provides more durable load transfer and redundant load paths compared to current state-of-the-art adhesively bonded strap joints. NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA solicits interest from companies interested in obtaining license rights to commercialize, manufacture and market this technology. For more information about this technology transfer opportunity, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
Partnering with NASA Langley Research Center
 
05:11
Langley develops technologies for space exploration, for advancing the understanding of the earth's climate, and for improving air transportation. These technologies have many potential nearer term and 'down to earth' benefits. Benefits to improve the quality of life. Helping us work better, play better, and live better. Through partnerships, we can create new technologies and relationships that can be mutually valuable in reducing R & D costs, expanding capabilities, accelerating solutions to technical challenges, creating new products. For examples of successful technologies from partnerships, please visit our success stories, and consider how The Technology Gateway can offer value to you. For contact information, please visit https://sites-e.larc.nasa.gov/technologygateway/contact-2/
NASA Langley Advanced VTOL Webinar
 
41:35
Webinar presented on June 6, 2018 by David North on Advance Vertical Take Off and Landing (VTOL) UAVs that are available for licensing from NASA Langley Research Center.
NASA Langley | Chris Wohl
 
01:46
When Christopher Wohl first started at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia he had only made a single polymer. Today, his research primarily focuses on polymeric materials. http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/
NASA Langley's Floating Ultrasonic Transducer Demonstration
 
05:56
For more information about this technology and other NASA technologies that are available for licesing, please visit: http://technologygateway.nasa.gov/

american dating websites online
bethel ak dating
casual dating break up
entj dating enfp
number 1 dating app for iphone