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Search results “Safety life at sea” for the 2015
SAFETY AT SEA
 
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Views: 3620 CasinoLogistics
R.A.L- Safety of Life at Sea (S.O.L.A.S)
 
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Music- R.A.L (Rhiana Alana Lewis) David Alexander Portillo Music video shot/edited by Lillian Saucedo-LIllipop Fauxtography Special thanks to- Lilly Hernanez , Skyler Roth and Joshua Peterson Mixed /Mastered at Revolution 9 studious by Daniel Balistocky
Views: 1094 R.A.L Music
Six Months At Sea In The Merchant Marine
 
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In this short documentary, I tried to answer some of the common questions that I usually get about shipping. The footage I took myself using fairly basic cameras that I could fit in my pocket while I was on the job as a deckhand. The story follows me on a six month journey around the world on a container ship which was on a run between New York and Singapore via the Suez Canal. This was my first time going to sea on a large ship so everything was relatively new to me, therefore please excuse the couple of shipping terms I misused (such as saying "license" when I should have said "credential"). I have been on many ships since and will continue to ship out for the foreseeable future. Thanks for watching. Film by Martin Machado - http://www.martinmachado.com -Special thanks to Jesse Chandler with Third Street Works, and Kai Hsing for their help All Rights Reserved 2012 - This video can not be duplicated or used in part in any form of media. Use of this video in a business or institution for training purposes is prohibited without written permission by Martin Machado.
Views: 833827 Martin Machado
Bermuda EPII: Safety at Sea
 
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Video sharing some of the lessons I learned at US Sailing Safety at Sea Seminar prepping for Bermuda. Learn about swimming in foul weather gear with shoes on, hydrostatic PFD automatic inflation and the challenges of climbing into a life raft wearing that inflated PFD. Even in the 70 degree pool some sailors were showing signs of hypothermia! Filmed with GoPro HERO4 Silver and Sony Alpha A5100. Audio recorded with Tascam DR-05 audio recorder and JK MIC-J 044 Lavalier Mic. More filmmaking information here: http://savvysalt.com/blog/film-making-for-under-1000/
Views: 976 SavvySalt
Life at Sea | European Spirit
 
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A tour inside the European Spirit sailing to San Francisco. #OneTankerTeam www.teekaytankers.com
Views: 111658 Teekay Corporation
Inside Oil Tankers - Documentary Films
 
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CLICK HERE - http://activeterium.com/1DCR - FOR MORE FREE DOCUMENTARIES Inside Oil Tankers - Documentary Films All over the world, tanker operations are constantly moving. Oil tankers are ships specially designed for the bulk transport of either unrefined crude oil or petrochemicals. Their size classes can range from coastal or inland tankers of a few thousand metric tons of deadweight (DWT) to a colossal amount of 550,000 DWT. These giant specialized ships transport approximately two billion metric tons of oil across the sea every year. Crude oil is one of the world's most consumed sources of energy. Oil tankers, therefore, play a significant role in the way the country operates. Because of the products they are built to carry, without proper maintenance, these mammoth ships of black gold can also pose a threat on the environment. To ensure that an oil tanker does not severely impact the environment, oil companies must employ an expert and highly experienced ship management service to oversee tanker operations. They must also routinely check their oil tankers for maintenance purposes. Fixing the smallest dent, scratch or crack can mean the difference between safe sailing across miles of seawater and a devastating oil spill. On board the ship, safety measures should be strictly imposed. Because of the hazardous - and often flammable - nature of the materials being transported, the possession of flammable objects should be avoided if not prohibited entirely to avoid accidents, which can threaten the lives of the people on the ship, as well as the surrounding marine life. Whether at sea or anchored at a dock, tanker operations and safety measures should still be strictly implemented to prevent the ship from negatively affecting the environment.
Views: 1994500 Documentary Films
SAFETY AT SEA JOINT EXERCISE
 
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A team of medical staff from the Pattaya Memorial Hospital in Central Pattaya together with members of the Sawang Boriboon Rescue Team held a joint practice exercise at sea on the afternoon of Thursday, 20th August at Bali Hai Port. A real life mock up scenario was set up for a rescue at sea operation for the teams and their volunteers to practice rescue techniques. Stunt volunteers went into the sea pretending to be tourists in trouble after their boat had sunk. Speed boats were sent into action and time after time the “injured” survivors were taken onboard and then put safely on shore until all were rescued. Communication techniques and good teamwork was evaluated and was deemed to have been performed effectively to the delight of the panel of judges. News stories placed on this website are short versions. If you would like the full story, please read the Pattaya People Weekly newspaper.
safety at sea
 
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more info at https://tioga1444.wordpress.com/
Views: 83 pkersten1
AVSEQ01
 
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The International Maritime Organisation, London amended SOLAS (Safety of Life at Sea) regulations from July 1986 with far reaching consequences as it introduced new rules for use of Lifeboats on ships in particular Oil and Gas Carriers etc., which proved to be a turning point in the history of M/s Vadyar Boats Pvt Ltd, Chennai, India. Successfully indigenously designed and manufactured the 8 mtr 50 Persons capacity FRP Totally Enclosed Fire Protected Lifeboat after conducting all the prototype tests including the most severe fire test in the very first attempt achieved by only a few Lifeboat builders globally. For this purpose, the Lifeboat was placed in a specially erected concrete tank at the outskirts of Chennai with no human habitation, filled with 3,400 ltrs of kerosene and petrol burned for a continuous period of 14 minutes with a couple of mice kept inside the boat.
What happened to this family? Finding life jackets and passports at sea
 
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Canadian mining executive Gordon Walker shares his story of finding personal items in the Aegean Sea while vacationing with his family
Views: 110 The Globe and Mail
SSANZ Safety at Sea Triple Series - Race 2
 
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by Live Sail Die
Views: 416 Sail/Fail
SAFETY AT SEA DURING SONGKRAN PATTAYA PEOPLE MEDIA GROUP
 
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SAFETY AT SEA DURING SONGKRAN Click the link to watch this (and many other) TV news stories: http://www.pattayapeople.com/Community-News/SAFETY-AT-SEA-DURING-SONGKRAN_1304201505 In order to enforce safety at sea during Songkran, all main harbour departments from Sattahip to Bali Hai, right up to Sriracha are cooperating with each other in the build up to the start of the Songkran Festival to make sure that rules and regulations are observed at sea – especially on ferries travelling to nearby islands. On the afternoon of Saturday, 11th April, Chonburi Governor Komsan Ekachai was at Bali Hai to make sure that all was in order. Life jackets must be made available for everyone and worn whilst travelling on board all public vessels and ferries. No overcrowding will be allowed, with passengers up to the accepted limit, otherwise boats will not be allowed to leave harbours. No drinking of alcohol will be allowed on board for both crews and passengers and there will be a trained officer on each boat to maintain safety at sea at all times.
Safety at Sea - Wave Making for Testing the Vessel...
 
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Fisheries Research Agency of Japan
Views: 22 Worawit Wanchana
ISAF "Safety at Sea" Seminar
 
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Video and pictures during the weekend "Safety at Sea" Seminar in November 2014 in order to fulfill the ISAF requirements for offshore regattas. Held at a marine base in Neustadt / Holstein in Germany, we were able to make use of the leak chamber, the fire hall and the wave pool for realistic exercises. These, combined with a lot of hands-on classroom material, made for an excellent course
Views: 752 Sv Zanshin
Life on the ship MV Explorer at Semester At Sea
 
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@Spring 2015 Last voyage of MV Explorer for Semester At Sea. #LVBV#
Views: 633 ceciauyeung
Safety at Sea - Blocking a leak at a test centre
 
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At the Safety at Sea seminar in June 2015 we watched a demonstration of blocking a leak at a test centre
Views: 73 Avmar Marine
A career at sea looks like...
 
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This year, IMO's Day of the Seafarer campaign aims to inspire young people to consider a career at sea and learn more about this viable and exciting profession.
Views: 53394 IMOHQ
Inflating Life Raft in a Pool (Safety at Sea Course)
 
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This past weekend I took a Safety at Sea course at West Vancouver Yacht Club. One of the segments we learned how to inflate a life raft and so much more!
Views: 649 Sarah Pacopac
Mega Yacht -Variety Voyager- 68 m
 
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Variety Voyager Cruise Vessel The newly built 68 m/ 223 ft. state of the art Mega Yacht can accommodate 72 passengers in 36 cabins. Built under the latest International “Safety of Life At Sea” (SOLAS 2010) regulations and classified by RINA Classification Society, the Variety Voyager guarantees guests safety along with incomparable comfort and elegance. The Variety Voyager will seduce her passengers with her sleek lines and ample deck space, very much what one expects from a millionaire’s super yacht. Inside, cabins and public areas are finished with warm fabrics, rich marbles, Axminster carpeting and soft tone wood panelling. Everywhere, unobstructed views of the sea and of the ports visited. And above all, the professional service of a crew of 30, always with a smile and a true desire to satisfy our guest’s requests. Yacht Specifications Launched: 2012 Classification: RINA Flag: Maltese Power: Caterpillar 3512 Length: 68m Beam: 11.5m Draft: 3.5m Cruising Speed: 14 knots Stabilisers: Yes Cabins: 36 Passengers: 72 Vessel Facilities – Variety Voyage 36 exterior and fully equipped cabins Indoor restaurant seating 75 passengers – Full height glass windows all around. Audiovisual equipment. Outdoor restaurant area seating 50 people and connected by sliding glass doors to the inside restaurant area. Lounge area at main deck seating 75 passengers and adjoining Reception area & Bar. Audiovisual equipment. Internet corner and library. Mini Spa , with massage room, sauna, hair and beauty care and fitness equipment Sun deck Lounge Bar -Partly shaded 200 m2 / 2,200 sq. ft sun bathing area with sunloungers and balinese beds at Sun Deck
Views: 2161 itp
Life at Sea MV "Fehn Light"
 
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Impressions from MV "Fehn Light" by Igor Buchlak. The vessel is part of the fleet of Fehn Ship Management. www.fehnship.de
Views: 1627 EMS-Fehn-Group
What You Need To Know About Life At Sea
 
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Check out some fun and not so fun tips about what it's like to live and travel across the Pacific ocean from Honolulu, Hawaii to Yokohama, Japan. The longest and most rocky stretch of ocean we are crossing on the Semester At Sea 2015 Spring Voyage around the world! Thanks so much to everyone who has subscribed! You are so amazing and are making this journey that much sweeter! Follow me on my journey! I'm going too… Hilo, Hawaii Yokohama, Japan Kobe, Japan Shanghai, China Hong Kong, China Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam Singapore, Singapore Yangon, Myanmar (Burma) Cochin, India Port Louis, Mauritius Cape Town, South Africa Walvis Bay, Namibia Casablanca, Morocco Southampton, England and we'll see from there! Check out www.ehrensworld.com for some great blog posts. Subscribe to follow me around the world on this adventure or follow me here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ehrenhotchkiss Twitter: https://twitter.com/EhrenHotchkiss Instagram: https://instagram.com/ehrenhotchkiss/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ehrenhotchkiss/ Tumblr: http://ehrenhotchkiss.tumblr.com Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ehrenhotchkiss/posts -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Ship Tour 2015" ➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7reJFrlwgQ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 7880 Ehren's World
DNCE - Cake By The Ocean
 
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Cake By The Ocean (Official Video) Song taken from the SWAAY EP Download: http://republicrec.co/DNCESwaayEx Stream/Share “Cake By The Ocean” on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/track/42ftjU4cTN5UTRksyqBKZJ Follow DNCE Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/DNCE Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/DNCE Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DNCEmusic Snapchat: DNCEmusic Directed by Black Coffee & Gigi Hadid Producer by Andrew Lerios Music video by DNCE performing Cake By The Ocean. © 2015 Republic Records a division of UMG Recordings Inc. http://vevo.ly/5StuEf Best of DNCE: https://goo.gl/haNe6F Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/SfnZbH
Views: 330526083 DNCEVEVO
News Footage: Boat Sinking
 
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The sea rescue that lead to the development of Life Cell. The rescue was covered by many news outlets both in Australia and Overseas.
Sea Safe Life Raft Inflation
 
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Sea Safe Liferaft Inflation video. see www.datrex.com for more details
Views: 661 Datrex Inc
Seattle Maritime Industry: Safe at Sea
 
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After seeing a need for hands-on safety survival and fire training in the maritime industry, Captain Jon Kjaerulff founded Fremont Maritime Services in 1989. Located at the foot of the Ballard Bridge on Salmon Bay in Seattle, it's trained more than 10,000 mariners over the last 25 years.
Views: 125 Eye of the Needle
Life at Sea!
 
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We work hard, party harder! Its a lonely life, Here is our home and our lonely Seaman Life!
Cruise Ship Life Boat Drill - What To Expect
 
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Cruise Ship Life Boat Drill - What To Expect Are you planning to take a cruise? Binoculars http://amzn.to/2j9LPYy Every cruise begins with a lifeboat drill shortly after sailing, like this one on Holland America Cruise Lines. When you first board your ship, find your cabin, and locate the safety information on the cabin door. Locate where your life jackets are stored. As you familiarize yourself with your ship, notice the emergency exit signs, and find where your lifeboat station is. Now you are ready for the life boat drill, sometimes called a muster drill, and for any emergency that should happen at sea. Have a fun and fabulous cruise, one of my favorite ways to travel! No matter where you cruise, a lifeboat drill is an important safety drill the first day you sail. Are you ready for an abandon ship lifeboat drill? ★☆★ SUBSCRIBE TO ME ON YOUTUBE: ★☆★ https://www.youtube.com/c/alaskagranny?sub_confirmation=1 ★☆★ FOLLOW ME BELOW: ★☆★ Blog: http://www.alaskagranny.com/travel-alaska/ ★☆★ RECOMMENDED RESOURCES: ★☆★ Binoculars http://amzn.to/2j9LPYy Sunscreen Spray http://amzn.to/2mjZMTq Mosquito Repellent http://amzn.to/2rnnaG8 Travel Umbrella http://amzn.to/2r1QzWZ
Views: 34917 AlaskaGranny
A Matter of Life and Death: Dougie's Story
 
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Dougie is a fisherman on the Isle of Coll, catching shellfish from his boat Seafarer III. Whilst out alone on February 14th 2014, he fell overboard and couldn’t get himself back on his boat. Fortunately he was wearing a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) which saved his life that day. Watch as Dougie Brown talks about his experience of what is every commercial fisherman’s greatest fear. The ‘Sea You Home Safe’ campaign aims to provide every commercial fishermen in the UK with a free PFD and encourage them to wear it whilst working out at sea. For more information visit: http://www.seafish.org/training/sea-you-home-safe Camera and post-production: Beard Askew Productions Produced and edited by Jade Beard and Tim Askew Executive Producer for Seafish: Denise Fraser Music: Licensed from The Music Bed ©Seafish 2015 http://www.seafish.org/
Views: 4015 Seafish
Cabin Module B15 for Marine Industry Accommodation
 
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FCR Finland's proprietary cabin module meets and exceeds the tightest IMO’s Safety of Life at Sea requirements in a way never before seen in the market. The cabin structure is certified with all penetrations and modules in place. This includes: AC cabin unit, LED down lights with electrical wire and pipe penetrations with wires and pipes. It makes the cabin the first of its kind to be tested as a complete structure for fire integrity. The cabin ensures passenger comfort with: - High-quality materials and production - Optimal sound insulation and uniform down lighting that creates a comfortable atmosphere - Stable temperature to increase the joy of living - and practical and attractive design For ship owners, the cabin structure and provided services give flexibility to customize the cabin to fit their needs cost-effectively. Because the entire value-chain is by one contractor, the delivery is reliable and the process is easy and transparent to follow. The FCR value-chain holds within the entire project from project management to project design, material and resource procurement, production of the cabin and installation with continuous life-cycle support. Learn more about the cabin from http://fcr-finland.fi/materials/
Views: 1464 FCR Finland
SeaSafeProLight
 
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Datrex demonstration of the Sea Safe Pro-Light Self Righting Inflatable Liferaft
Views: 1119 Datrex Inc
Emergency bags promote safety at sea in Niue
 
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In an effort to ensure the safety of lives at sea, 20 emergency 'grab bags' were presented by the European Union Ambassador for the Pacific to small-scale fishers and boat owners in Niue. The emergency kits were made made possible through the Development of Tuna Fisheries in the Pacific Project, an EU supported initiative which is implemented by the Pacific Community (SPC).
Views: 252 Pacific Community
Cruise Ship Job Application Info. Interview With Heather from PMC Ep.  8
 
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http://getalifeatsea.com http://getalifeatsea.com/guidetoadventure/ Cruise Line Application Interview with Heather from PMC Ep. 8 Watch this video for TONS of tips regarding Cruise Line Applications and Resumes. Interview with Heather from Page Marine Crews www.pmcmarine.com Heather has been in the Marine Recruitment field for over 25 years. In this video Heather provides us with recommendations regarding your Cruise Line Application and Resume. Check out more information on 'How to Get Cruise Ship Jobs' on my my site at http://getalifeatsea.com Need information regarding how to apply for a cruise ship job? Check out my 'How the Heck to Get a Job on a Cruise Ship' guide at http://getalifeatsea.com/guidetoadventure/ Happy Sailing Amanda Social Media Links www.facebook.com/getalifeatsea.comhomeis­wheretheanchordrops https://twitter.com/Getalifeatsea https://instagram.com/Getalifeatsea/ https://plus.google.com/+Getalifeatsea/ For periscope search for me by my twitter handle @getalifeatsea https://youtu.be/9XgliOE_79s
Views: 12221 Get a Life at Sea
Maritime Safety Important
 
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Small sea craft users need to follow maritime safety rules and regulations to keep sea travellers safe, and prevent accidents from occurring. This message is being stressed by the National Maritime and Safety Authority, following reports of a tragic boating accident in Port Moresby, which claimed the life of a fisherman.- visit us at http://www.emtv.com.pg/ for the latest news...
Views: 121 EMTV Online
Indonesia: Rohingya Saved At Sea
 
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In May 2015 more than 1,800 people from Myanmar and Bangladesh arrived by boat in Aceh, Indonesia. Many among the group were Rohingya men, women and children from Myanmar. They claimed to have been at sea for months and were abandoned by the boats’ crews some days/ weeks before their boats landed in Aceh. UNHCR estimates that in the first three months of this year, 25,000 people left on smugglers’ boats from the Bay of Bengal. They put their lives in the hands of smugglers and make perilous journeys to avoid persecution and poverty in their countries of origin. Read our latest comments: http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=55685ad26&query=rohingya Information for media: If you would like to use this video to communicate refugee stories or require B-Roll, transcripts, stills or much more information, please contact us at [email protected] or [email protected] --- Keep up to date with our latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/unhcr?sub_confirmation=1 -- UNHCR, the UN refugee agency, works to protect and assist those fleeing war and persecution. Since 1950, we have helped tens of millions of people find safety and rebuild their lives. With your support, we can restore hope for many more. Read more at http://UNHCR.org Support our work with refugees now by subscribing to this channel, liking this video and sharing it with your friends and contacts. Thanks so much for your help.
Variety Voyager-Limassol Cyprus-18 Jun 2015
 
04:20
Variety Voyager Cruise Vessel The newly built 68 m/ 223 ft. state of the art Mega Yacht can accommodate 72 passengers in 36 cabins. Built under the latest International “Safety of Life At Sea” (SOLAS 2010) regulations and classified by RINA Classification Society, the Variety Voyager guarantees guests safety along with incomparable comfort and elegance. The Variety Voyager will seduce her passengers with her sleek lines and ample deck space, very much what one expects from a millionaire’s super yacht. Inside, cabins and public areas are finished with warm fabrics, rich marbles, Axminster carpeting and soft tone wood panelling. Everywhere, unobstructed views of the sea and of the ports visited. And above all, the professional service of a crew of 30, always with a smile and a true desire to satisfy our guest’s requests. Yacht Specifications Launched: 2012 Classification: RINA Flag: Maltese Power: Caterpillar 3512 Length: 68m Beam: 11.5m Draft: 3.5m Cruising Speed: 14 knots Stabilisers: Yes Cabins: 36 Passengers: 72 Vessel Facilities – Variety Voyage 36 exterior and fully equipped cabins Indoor restaurant seating 75 passengers – Full height glass windows all around. Audiovisual equipment. Outdoor restaurant area seating 50 people and connected by sliding glass doors to the inside restaurant area. Lounge area at main deck seating 75 passengers and adjoining Reception area & Bar. Audiovisual equipment. Internet corner and library. Mini Spa , with massage room, sauna, hair and beauty care and fitness equipment Sun deck Lounge Bar -Partly shaded 200 m2 / 2,200 sq. ft sun bathing area with sunloungers and balinese beds at Sun Deck
Views: 96 itp
North Korean ship detained in Hong Kong for safety violations
 
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SHOTLIST 1. Wide shot of North Korean ship Kang Nam I at sea 2. Mid shot of ship with North Korean flag imprinted on funnel 3. Close-up "Kang Nam I" reading on back of ship 4. Wide shot back of ship 5. Close-up crew on board, zoom out to crew on deck 6. Various shots of vessel in water STORYLINE A North Korean ship that planned to deliver scrap metal to Taiwan was detained in Hong Kong for safety violations, a government official said on Tuesday. The ship's detention was unrelated to recent UN sanctions on North Korea that call for searches of vessels sailing to and from the communist country, according to a spokeswoman for Hong Kong's Marine Department. The ship, the Kang Nam I, was detained on Monday after arriving without cargo on Sunday from Shanghai, the spokeswoman said. Inspectors found faulty navigational, firefighting and life safety equipment on the craft, as well as outdated nautical charts, she said. The detention came about a week after the UN Security Council unanimously approved sanctions that included inspections of North Korean ships. The UN measures were prompted by North Korea's nuclear test on October 9. The vessel was detained during a routine, random check on ships for safety violations. Hong Kong officials have inspected nine North Korean ships this year and have detained seven, including the Kang Nam I, the spokeswoman said. A woman who answered the phone at Topping Enterprises, the local shipping agent for the Kang Nam I, said the firm was helping the vessel meet the marine requirements in Hong Kong and expected it to leave local waters in the next two days. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d4d9dd01d8aaa868146fad863491c697 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 127 AP Archive
Inspecting lifelines. A quick look at how to inspect your boats lifelines.
 
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A quick video to help you inspect your boats lifelines and unsure yours and your crews safety while at sea. In this video Capt Wayne Canning reviews the process of inspecting your boats lifelines. Be sure to see all our Voyaging tips videos at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU_YQAWmlZUg2zbKPmkbN9g Also be sure to check out Ocean Navigator online http://www.oceannavigator.com/
Titanic Original Video Footage
 
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RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early morning of 15 April 1912 after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton, UK to New York City, US. The sinking resulted in the loss of more than 1,500 passengers and crew making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. The RMS Titanic, the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service, was the second of three Olympic class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line, and was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast with Thomas Andrews as her naval architect. Andrews was among those lost in the sinking. On her maiden voyage, she carried 2,224 passengers and crew. Under the command of Edward Smith, the ship's passengers included some of the wealthiest people in the world, as well as hundreds of emigrants from Great Britain and Ireland, Scandinavia and elsewhere throughout Europe seeking a new life in North America. A wireless telegraph was provided for the convenience of passengers as well as for operational use. Although Titanic had advanced safety features such as watertight compartments and remotely activated watertight doors, there were not enough lifeboats to accommodate all of those aboard due to outdated maritime safety regulations. Titanic only carried enough lifeboats for 1,178 people—slightly more than half of the number on board, and one-third her total capacity. After leaving Southampton on 10 April 1912, Titanic called at Cherbourg in France and Queenstown (now Cobh) in Ireland before heading west to New York.[2] On 14 April 1912, four days into the crossing and about 375 miles (600 km) south of Newfoundland, she hit an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. ship's time. The collision caused the ship's hull plates to buckle inwards along her starboard side and opened five of her sixteen watertight compartments to the sea; the ship gradually filled with water. Meanwhile, passengers and some crew members were evacuated in lifeboats, many of which were launched only partly loaded. A disproportionate number of men were left aboard because of a "women and children first" protocol followed by some of the officers loading the lifeboats.[3] By 2:20 a.m., she broke apart and foundered, with well over one thousand people still aboard. Just under two hours after Titanic foundered, the Cunard liner RMS Carpathia arrived on the scene of the sinking, where she brought aboard an estimated 705 survivors. The disaster was greeted with worldwide shock and outrage at the huge loss of life and the regulatory and operational failures that had led to it. Public inquiries in Britain and the United States led to major improvements in maritime safety. One of their most important legacies was the establishment in 1914 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), which still governs maritime safety today. Additionally, several new wireless regulations were passed around the world in an effort to learn from the many missteps in wireless communications—which could have saved many more passengers.[4] The wreck of Titanic remains on the seabed, split in two and gradually disintegrating at a depth of 12,415 feet (3,784 m). Since her discovery in 1985, thousands of artefacts have been recovered and put on display at museums around the world. Titanic has become one of the most famous ships in history, her memory kept alive by numerous books, folk songs, films, exhibits, and memorials.
Views: 2984 Lion brave
Titanic facts , 10 Facts about The Titanic
 
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RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early morning of 15 April 1912 after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton, UK, to New York City, US. The sinking resulted in the loss of more than 1,500 passengers and crew, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. The RMS Titanic, the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service, was the second of three Olympic class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line, and was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast with Thomas Andrews as her naval architect. Andrews was among those lost in the sinking. On her maiden voyage, she carried 2,224 passengers and crew. Under the command of Edward Smith, the ship's passengers included some of the wealthiest people in the world, as well as hundreds of emigrants from Great Britain and Ireland, Scandinavia and elsewhere throughout Europe seeking a new life in North America. A high-power radiotelegraph transmitter was available for sending passenger "marconigrams" and for the ship's operational use. Although Titanic had advanced safety features such as watertight compartments and remotely activated watertight doors, there were not enough lifeboats to accommodate all of those aboard due to outdated maritime safety regulations. Titanic only carried enough lifeboats for 1,178 people—slightly more than half of the number on board, and one-third her total capacity. After leaving Southampton on 10 April 1912, Titanic called at Cherbourg in France and Queenstown (now Cobh) in Ireland before heading west to New York.[2] On 14 April 1912, four days into the crossing and about 375 miles (600 km) south of Newfoundland, she hit an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. ship's time. The collision caused the ship's hull plates to buckle inwards along her starboard side and opened five of her sixteen watertight compartments to the sea; the ship gradually filled with water. Meanwhile, passengers and some crew members were evacuated in lifeboats, many of which were launched only partly loaded. A disproportionate number of men were left aboard because of a "women and children first" protocol followed by some of the officers loading the lifeboats.[3] By 2:20 a.m., she broke apart and foundered, with well over one thousand people still aboard. Just under two hours after Titanic foundered, the Cunard liner RMS Carpathia arrived on the scene of the sinking, where she brought aboard an estimated 705 survivors. The disaster was greeted with worldwide shock and outrage at the huge loss of life and the regulatory and operational failures that had led to it. Public inquiries in Britain and the United States led to major improvements in maritime safety. One of their most important legacies was the establishment in 1914 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), which still governs maritime safety today. Additionally, several new wireless regulations were passed around the world in an effort to learn from the many missteps in wireless communications—which could have saved many more passengers.[4] The wreck of Titanic remains on the seabed, split in two and gradually disintegrating at a depth of 12,415 feet (3,784 m). Since her discovery in 1985, thousands of artefacts have been recovered and put on display at museums around the world. Titanic has become one of the most famous ships in history, her memory kept alive by numerous books, folk songs, films, exhibits, and memorials.
Views: 1106 TOP 10 BRO
Sea Snakes | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Many people don't realize that there are snakes that live in the ocean. And believe it or not, they're actually considerably more venomous than land snakes! Jonathan travels to Australia and the Philippines to find these marine reptiles, and learns why they are almost completely harmless to divers. This is an HD upload of a segment previously released in season 3. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The sea snake is an animal surrounded in mystery—known for its incredibly powerful venom, but not much else. Just how dangerous are these marine reptiles? I have traveled to Queensland, Australia on a quest to learn about sea snakes. Here on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, sea snakes are fairly common. Lets go see if we can find one. I hit the water, grab my camera and head towards the sea floor. Today I’m diving on a little seamount called a coral Bommie. It’s a mini-mountain of coral sticking up from the bottom, but not quite reaching the surface. Near the top of the Bommie, thousands of small fish feed on plankton passing by in the current, but they stay close to the reef, because they are being watched by a big school of jacks who are on the prowl for food themselves. The bommie is covered in healthy coral that provides lots of nooks and crannies for the fish to hide if they need cover. On the other side of the bommie, a large school of snappers are also looking for something to eat, and keeping a safe distance from the jacks. As I swim along at the base of the bommie, I’m keeping my eyes open for a snake-like animal. The coral looks healthy and a Spinecheek anemonefish gives me a quick glance from the safety of her host anemone. But I keep scanning the bottom and at last I have found my quarry: an olive sea snake, the most common species around the Great Barrier Reef. It’s swimming along the bottom doing the same thing everything else is doing—looking for food. The sea snake is closely related to a land snake, except it has adapted for life underwater. When a sea snake flicks its tongue, it’s getting rid of excess salt secreted by special glands in its mouth. Sea snakes live exclusively in the ocean, but since they’re reptiles, their kidneys can’t deal with too much excess salt in their blood. A sea snake gets around with a flattened section of tail that looks like an oar and serves as a fin. It looks just like an eel when it swims, undulating its body and getting propulsion from that flattened tail. Although sea snakes prefer to eat fish, eels and shrimp, these snappers aren’t at all afraid of the sea snake, because they are way too big for the sea snake to bite. This snake is heading for the surface to grab a breath of air. A sea snake, just like a land snake, has lungs and must breathe air to survive. It can hold its breath up to 3 hours during a dive. Recent research has shown that some sea snakes also can absorb a little bit of oxygen directly from the water through their skin, which is probably why a breath can last so long. After spending a minute at the surface breathing, the sea snake comes back down to the bottom. It’s poking around, looking for holes where it might corner a fish or shrimp. It sticks its head into the holes, hoping to get lucky. The sea snake is most closely related to the Cobra on land, and its venom is quite similar to cobra venom, but considerably more potent. If it manages to grab a fish, the venom will kill it in seconds. Sea snakes quite often take a rest on the bottom, sleeping as they hold their breath. I use the opportunity to sneak up on one. In spite of their fearsome venom, sea snakes are very timid and not particularly aggressive. Although this one is obviously not thrilled about being picked up, it doesn’t try to bite me. And when I let go, it just swims away. I find another one and can’t resist the opportunity to show the flattened tail section. Swim, be free! Although the sea snake is one of the most venomous animals in the world, you’re not very likely to be bitten by one. There are 62 known species of sea snakes and they live all around the tropical Indo-Pacific. I found this banded sea snake in the Philippines. They like nice warm tropical water because they are cold-blooded, like all reptiles. If the water gets too cold, they get lethargic. So, no matter what you might think of snakes, sea snakes are timid and shy animals that represent almost no threat at all to people, even though they produce some of the most powerful venom in the world.
Views: 5239023 BlueWorldTV
Lost at sea: Missing El Faro ship believed to be 15,000 feet below Atlantic - TomoNews
 
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JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA — Rescuers fear the missing cargo ship El Faro is now 15,000 feet below the Atlantic after being caught in Hurricane Joaquin near the Bahamas on Thursday. NBC News reports that on Tuesday morning, Hurricane Joaquin was just a tropical storm whose path would not interfere with the El Faro's route. By midday, the storm was moving closer to the ship's path. At 5 p.m., an advisory was issued warning that the storm could turn into a hurricane near the Bahamas, where the the ship's path will be directly affected. Despite this, the El Faro set sail for San Juan at 8 p.m. The ship's captain closely monitored the weather and was not alarmed, communicating to headquarters that conditions were good and his crew was prepared. But by Thursday, the ship sent out a distress call saying it had lost power, was taking on water, and was listed at 15 degrees, according to News 4 Jax. With no propulsion, the El Faro was drifting near the eye of a Category 4 hurricane with winds blowing at 130 miles per hour, seas 50 feet up, and zero visibility, reports Reuters. The Coast Guard believes the ship has sunk, though the actual vessel has yet to be located. A life ring, a damaged lifeboat, and survival suits, one of which contained human remains, has also been found among debris. Rescuers are still searching for any El Faro mariners that could have survived. ----------------------------------------­--------------------- Welcome to TomoNews, where we animate the most entertaining news on the internets. Come here for an animated look at viral headlines, US news, celebrity gossip, salacious scandals, dumb criminals and much more! Subscribe now for daily news animations that will knock your socks off. Visit our official website for all the latest, uncensored videos: http://us.tomonews.net Check out our Android app: http://bit.ly/1rddhCj Check out our iOS app: http://bit.ly/1gO3z1f Get top stories delivered to your inbox everyday: http://bit.ly/tomo-newsletter Stay connected with us here: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Twitter @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Google+ http://plus.google.com/+TomoNewsUS/ Instagram @tomonewsus http://instagram.com/tomonewsus -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Crying dog breaks the internet’s heart — but this sad dog story has a happy ending" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4prKTN9bYQc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 7397 TomoNews US
Merchant Marine in WWII: "Men and the Sea" 1943 US War Shipping Administration
 
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more at http://quickfound.net "Short documentary shows how U.S. merchant seamen were trained in seamanship, signaling, gunnery and radio operation." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Merchant_Marine The United States Merchant Marine is the fleet of U.S. civilian-owned merchant vessels, operated by either the government or the private sector, that engage in commerce or transportation of goods and services in and out of the navigable waters of the United States. The Merchant Marine is responsible for transporting cargo and passengers during peacetime. In time of war, the Merchant Marine is capable of being an auxiliary to the Navy, and can be called upon to deliver military personnel and materiel for the military. The Merchant Marine, however, does not have a role in combat, although a merchant mariner has a responsibility to protect cargo carried aboard his ship. Merchant mariners move cargo and passengers between nations and within the United States, and operate and maintain deep-sea merchant ships, tugboats, towboats, ferries, dredges, excursion vessels, and other waterborne craft on the oceans, the Great Lakes, rivers, canals, harbors, and other waterways. As of 2006, the United States merchant fleet numbered 465 ships and approximately 100,000 people work on U.S. flag merchant ships. Seven hundred ships owned by American interests but registered, or flagged, in other countries are not included in this number. The federal government maintains fleets of merchant ships via organizations such as Military Sealift Command and the National Defense Reserve Fleet. In 2004, the federal government employed approximately 5% of all American water transportation workers. In the 19th and 20th centuries, various laws fundamentally changed the course of American merchant shipping. These laws put an end to common practices such as flogging and shanghaiing, and increased shipboard safety and living standards. The United States Merchant Marine is also governed by several international conventions to promote safety and prevent pollution... Revolutionary War The first wartime role of an identifiable United States merchant marine took place on June 12, 1775, in and around Machias, Maine. A group of citizens, hearing the news from Concord and Lexington, captured the British schooner HMS Margaretta... Word of this revolt reached Boston, where the Continental Congress and the various colonies issued Letters of Marque to privateers. The privateers interrupted the British supply chain all along the eastern seaboard of the United States and across the Atlantic Ocean. These actions by the privateers predate both the United States Coast Guard and the United States Navy, which were formed in 1790 and 1775, respectively. 19th and 20th centuries The merchant marine was active in subsequent wars, from the Confederate commerce raiders of the American Civil War, to the assaults on Allied commerce in the First and in the Second World Wars. 3.1 million tons of merchant ships were lost in World War II. Mariners died at a rate of 1 in 24, which was the highest rate of casualties of any service... Merchant shipping also played its role in the wars in Vietnam and Korea. During the Korean War, the number of ships under charter grew from 6 to 255. In September 1950, when the U.S. Marine Corps went ashore at Incheon, 13 Navy cargo ships, 26 chartered American, and 34 Japanese-manned merchant ships, under the operational control of Military Sea Transportation Service, participated. During the Vietnam War, ships crewed by civilian seamen carried 95% of the supplies used by the American armed forces. Many of these ships sailed into combat zones under fire. The SS Mayaguez incident involved the capture of mariners from the American merchant ship SS Mayaguez. During the first Gulf War, the merchant ships of the Military Sealift Command (MSC) delivered more than 11 million metric tons...
Views: 12903 Jeff Quitney
Minecraft | Lost at Sea | #32 SAVE THE VILLAGE
 
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Lanceypooh returns with more Lost at Sea Minecraft! In this episode Lancey and Redbeard begin to put plans in place to save the villagers from the taint! .:Subscribe:. http://bitly.com/JoinLegion Redbeard: http://bit.ly/Redbeard309 ~Stay Connected~ Twitter https://twitter.com/LanceypoohTV Facebook http://bit.ly/LanceypoohFacebook TwitchTV http://www.twitch.tv/lanceypooh Instagram http://www.instagram.com/lanceypoohtv Mail me stuff! 1113 Range Ave., Ste. 110-352 Denham Springs, LA 70726 #ModPack# DNS Techpack: http://www.atlauncher.com/pack/DNSTechpack/ *GameFanShop* Get great deals on Steam and Origin game keys! http://www.gamefanshop.com/partner-Lanceypooh/ ==Music== "Cut & Dry" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 77588 Lanceypooh
Floating Island on the way  - In Lebanon
 
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The First Floating Island in the world is now in the final phase of construction to be launched to sea. The workshops are spread at more than a hundred kilometers in Lebanon: Haret Sakher, Tripoli, KaberShmoun and Baysour. The Floating Island is designed to meet the requirements of the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). Beirut International Marine Industry and Commerce deploys a team of 450 Engineers and senior technicians, working in coordination with the Greek Class society INSB (International Naval Survey Bureau), to launch this First Floating Island in the History of mankind, to the sea from Lebanon to the world within this year 2015.
Views: 1189 Soir Daou
Inspiring Story of Pinoy Chief Cook at Sea
 
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Tune in to the inspiring story of Chief Cook Eliodoro Ranara who was awarded with the title Most Outstanding Family Builder by the Outstanding Balikbayan Reputation Awards (OBRA) There are approximately 400,000 Filipino seafarers deployed overseas, comprising roughly 30 percent of the global maritime fleet. Tinig ng Marino represents this sector by providing a platform for addressing issues concerning the Philippine maritime industry; particularly the protection and welfare of Filipino seafarers. The show is hosted by no less than Engineer Nelson Ramirez, president of United Seafarers Union and known watchdog of seafarers' issues. He is joined by seasoned broadcaster Annie Rentoy. Tinig ng Marino also dedicates a segment on general safety measures at work and at home. TINIG NG MARINO UNTV Channel 37 Saturday,6:15 to 7:00 p.m. http://www.untvweb.com/program/serbisyo-publiko-2/ Aired on: January 03, 2015

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