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How Writers Use Grammar for Style
 
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www.BeyondGrammarRules.com To be a powerful writer in fiction or nonfiction, your writing needs to be more than "correct." You need to know some grammar principles, not mere usage rules, to write with style. This video describes the true elements of style.
Views: 1016 Chris Olson
Grammar For Style & Clarity
 
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TEAS Prep - English and Language Usage - Grammar and Word Meanings in Context - Grammar for Style and Clarity - Coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjuctions, nominalization, active verbs, passive verbs
Views: 2953 Leslie Cox
American English & British English - 8 Grammar Differences
 
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http://www.engvid.com American English or British English? Accent and pronunciation are not the only differences! I'll show you 8 grammatical differences between these two styles of English. Once you understand the differences, you can choose which style you prefer to use. The choice you make will influence your speaking and writing. So pay close attention to this lesson, and choose the style you find most comfortable with! Do you want to speak like an American, or like a Brit? Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/american-english-british-english-8-grammar-differences TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is some grammatical differences between American English and British English because although we speak the same language and we understand each other, we actually have two varieties of English and we have different rules; we have some different grammar that comes with that. So I think this video is interesting for you if you're learning English. And I suggest you use this video to just make sure that whichever variety you prefer that you take all the rules associated with that variety. So don't think: "Oh, I like the rule for collective nouns in American English, that's easier, I'll do that but for British English, it's easier to spell like that". Don't do that. Just keep it standard. Pick one, learn the rules, keep it standard that way. I also think this will be interesting to you if you're a native speaker, so if you're an American, you're a British person and you just want to compare just for interest's sake. So, let's get started. Number one: collective nouns. A collective noun represents a noun standing for a collection of individuals or not necessarily individuals, but within one bigger thing. So, a good example is government. Government, do you see it as one thing making decisions as the government speaking as one voice, or do you see it as a collection of different political parties, or even different individuals within one thing - the government? In British English, we can make our collective nouns singular or plural to reflect the fact that just because one thing is a group, it doesn't necessarily mean that they're speaking with one voice or one vision. So we can say: "Tom's family is", or: "are coming to visit". In British English. It just depends. Do you have a happy family? Are you one family happy unit or are you a collection of different individuals making up that family; mom, dad, your brothers, your sisters? In which case, you can use: "are". In British English, we can say that, whereas in American English, we have to just use the singular verb. Here's an example: "The government have cut spending". Government is seen as one thing, so we use the singular verb. Moving on now, rule number two. We have different spelling rules also. Here's one to consider: spelling for "ed" words. In American English, it's generally preferred to spell with "ed". Let me tell you a story about something on my other YouTube channel. I have a video there that generates quite a lot of negative comments sometimes because I say something about Americans and they're not very, very happy when they watch it and sometimes people get really angry. And in a comment, somebody was like: "Hey, you can't even spell! You should spell 'learned' with 'ed', not a 't'". And she was like really angry, said all this stuff in there; taking the video way too seriously. And then, it started a bit of a comment thread, and people were like: "Hey, you're embarrassing Americans - you can spell it that way" and things like this. So, that's a good example of how when you... When you're used to your variety... I'm used to British English mainly, I'll sometimes see something in the American variety that confuses me. So obviously that girl hadn't seen "learnt" spelt with a "t" before which is okay in British English.
Irony | Style | Grammar
 
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Irony, puns, and sarcasm are some of the toughest concepts in English. This video attempts to explain all three.
Views: 36518 Khan Academy
English Grammar and Style | UQx on edX | Course About Video
 
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English Grammar and Style Learn how to use a knowledge of how words work to write in the style that readers value and that the university and the professions require. Register for English Grammar and Style from the University of Queensland at https://www.edx.org/course/uqx/uqx-write101x-english-grammar-style-1766 About this Course In the time-starved Internet world, where everyone’s a writer and everyone’s a reader, the demand for literacy is more intense than it has ever been. The ability to articulate ideas in smart, tight writing is crucial. Write101x will enable you to learn how words work so that you can write the concise, lucid, nuanced, and compelling prose that is so valued by readers. By providing you with a thorough grounding in grammar, syntax, and style, the course will sharpen and solidify your writing and editing competence and self-confidence.
Views: 32019 edX
Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century - with Steven Pinker
 
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Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Watch the Q&A here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rYAnYXIhL0 In this brand-new talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 424165 The Royal Institution
Grammar: Learn to use REPORTED SPEECH in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Reported speech and indirect speech mean the same thing: They allow you to express what someone has said. This sentence, "He said he was studying English", is an example of reported speech. But how do you conjugate the verbs? Is it "he said he was studying" or "he said he studied"? Both are correct depending on the situation. Learn how to say it correctly every time with Ronnie's quick and easy chart. Your friends said they watched this lesson. So what are you waiting for? http://www.engvid.com/reported-speech-he-said-she-said/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you some very, very simple reported speech things. If you don't know what reported speech is, welcome to the confusing word... World of confusing reported speech and words. Reported speech, maybe when you study it in your class, the teacher or whoever, will call it indirect speech. It's the same. So, indirect speech or reported speech is exactly the same. Yay. Why or how do we use reported speech? Good question. We use this to report or to write down what somebody has said. If somebody has told you something, this is going to be a quote. A "quote" means you copy the person's words exactly. You have to be really careful not to change their words. Reported speech or indirect speech is usually only used for writing. So, we don't really have to worry about all of these crazy rules when we speak. Whew, thank god. So, we're just going to go through the past, the present, and the future. We're going to change quoted speech into reported speech. This little chart will help you. If you want to copy down this chart, take a picture of the chart, I guarantee it will make your reported speech grammar class or grammar learning amazing. Check it out. So, in the present tense, we have two tenses, we have present simple or simple present and we have present continuous. As an example: "She eats lunch." is present simple. This is something she does every day. So if I wanted to report or write down this, write this down, I would use reported speech. So: "She eats lunch." My present simple, what I'm going to do is I'm going to take my verb "eats", and change it to past simple. So, present simple verb we're going to change to past simple. I would say: "She said she ate lunch." In this sentence, "eat" is present simple; in the reported speech, "ate" is my past simple. So, present simple changes to past simple in reported speech. If I have a present continuous example, this means something the person is doing now... For example: "He is painting." So he's an artist, he's got a paint brush and some paint, and he's painting. We have to change this to past continuous. So, if we have "is painting", all we have to do to make this past continuous is change it to "was painting". Present continuous to past continuous, the only thing that changes is our "to be" verb changes from present to past. "He said he was painting." Moving right along. Or moving back, back to the future. We have present perfect. An example of a present perfect sentence: "He", sorry. "They had a shower." It's about time; they smell a lot. So, if we wanted to report this or write this down, we would say... Oh, he said... He... Sorry: "They have had". This is strange, "have had". Check this out. Present perfect is going to change to past perfect. So: "They have had", if we change it to past perfect, we have to change it to "had had". Ronnie, "had had"? Is that true? Yes. This is right. So, present perfect, "have had", changes to "had" plus PP: "had had". So: "They said they had had a shower." And it's about time, because they're pretty smelly. The next one: past simple. For example: "He took my photo." In this sentence, your verb is "took". This is a past. So, past simple, present perfect, both of these we have to change to, again, past perfect. So we're going to change this to: "They said he had taken my photo." And the last one, past perfect, don't change it. It's cool. It's already done. Past perfect you have to change to past perfect, so you don't have to change the grammar in this sentence. -"They had had a dog." -"They said they had had"-that's crazy again, but it's true-"a dog." So, if you have a past sentence, present perfect, simple past, or past perfect, all of these are going to be changed to past perfect. That's easier. "Had" plus the past participle. You okay? Moving on to the future. We have two future tenses in English. Future simple or simple future, which is going to be "will", and we have future "going to". Simple future: "She will go." Future "going to": "They are going to play football with their new shoes." Do you play football? Future simple: "She will go", all we're going to do is change the verb or the modal "will" to "would". So it's going to change to: "She would go". That's cool. "Will" changes to "would". That's easy.
Advanced English Grammar: Participles
 
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Using participles correctly will dramatically improve the quality of your English writing. If you're learning English for university, IELTS, TOEFL, or for your career, this advanced writing lesson is for you! You will learn to analyze sentences so that you can understand them fully and write your own. Often, English learners are unsure of whether an "-ing" word is an adjective or an adverb. In this lesson, you'll learn how the participle "having" includes the subject, verb, and conjunction. I'll show you many example sentences, and you can practice what you've learned on our quiz at https://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-grammar-participles/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at participles. Now, this is a little bit more advanced grammar, but it's very useful and it's used in everyday speaking, but especially for writing and reading because you're going to see participles everywhere. What participles do is they help you get sentence variety, they help you make your sentences shorter, if necessary, they give you a little bit of style. Okay? There are two participles that we need to look at, they are called the active or passive participle. Sometimes you'll see them as present or past participle. Past participles, you're familiar with. Sometimes they're called the verb three, so: "eat", past tense "ate", past participle is "eaten". Right? So that's the participle. Now, especially with the "ing" you have to be careful because "ing" words, although they are verbs with "ing", they can be pretty much anything. They could be a gerund, as you know, so they're nouns; they could be part of the continuous verb, so "be going", so: "I am going", it's a continuous action; but "ing" words can also be adjectives and adverbs. When they are adjectives and adverbs they are actually participles. So it's very important to recognize them and know how to use them. So what I want to do first is I want to look at the adjective participles. Now, what you have to remember about adjective participles, they are... They are reduced adjective clauses. You know an adjective clause, it's meant to modify a noun. It identifies it or gives extra information about a noun. A participle, an adjective participle is that adjective clause minus the subject and the verb. Okay? But we're going to look at that in a second. So let's look at this sentence first. Oh, sorry, let me... I made a little mistake here. "Dressed in his class-A uniform, the marine looked like a recruitment poster." So this is the passive or the past participle ending in "ed", it's a regular verb, so: "dressed". "Dressed in his class-A uniform". Now, if I rearrange the sentence, really, it says: "The marine, who was dressed in his class-A uniform, looked like a recruitment poster." Okay? Like a poster that wants people to join the marines, etc. But I can take that adjective clause, I get rid of the "who was" or "who is", depending on the tense. Get rid of that, and I'm left with a participle phrase. Now, I can take that participle phrase and move it to the beginning of the sentence, just like I have here. The key when you're using participles at the beginning... A participle phrase at the beginning of a sentence, you must make sure that the subject, which is not there but it is understood: who was, who is the marine, so the marine who was dressed in his class-A, and then the subject of the independent clause must be the same subject. Okay? We're going to look at a couple more examples. "Standing near the window, Marie could see the entire village." Look at the other example: "Standing near the window, the entire village was in view." Now, many people will look at both sentences and think: "Yeah, okay, I understand them. They're both correct." This sentence is incorrect. Why? Because the subject here is "the village". Can the village stand near the window? No, it can't. So: "Standing near the window" means Marie. "Marie, who was standing near the window, could see the entire village." This subject cannot do this action, so you have to make sure that the implied or the understood subject in the participle is the exact same as the subject of the independent clause that follows it. Okay? That's very, very important. So now what we're going to do, I'm going to look at a few more examples and I want to show you that you can start the sentence with a participle phrase, but you can also leave it in the middle of the sentence. Okay? Let's look at that. Okay, let's look at these examples now and you'll see the different positions the participles can take. And again, we're talking about participle phrases for the most part. "The jazz musician, known for his tendency to daydream, got into a zone and played for an hour straight." Okay? So what we're doing here, we're giving you a little bit more information about the musician. We're not identifying him. We're giving you extra information, which is why we have the commas.
12 Common Errors in Academic English – and how to fix them!
 
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What's "academic writing"? If you're in school or university, you must know the difference between general English and academic English. Watch this important lesson to avoid the most common mistakes students make in academic writing. In your own language, the difference between these two modes of writing might not be that great, but in English, there are a lot of differences depending on the context. So even if you know your grammar and write a correct sentence, you might still be wrong because the structure or tone was not appropriate for an academic setting! Watch this video and learn how to write correctly and get higher grades in an academic environment. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/12-common-errors-in-academic-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca. And in today's lesson, I'll explain twelve common errors that students make in academic English. Now, what's academic English? It's the English that you need to use in school, college, or university when you're reading, writing, listening, and speaking -- okay -- ideally, but most importantly, when you're writing. Now, what's the difference between academic English and general English? Well, academic English in general -- there are many differences, but in general, academic English is more formal; it's more objective, and also, it has to use a lot of referencing. You always have to let people know where you got your information from. You have to cite the source. You have to give the source. You can't claim to write something and claim it as your own. Okay? If you do that, that's called "plagiarism". It's a very serious offense in academic circles. But today, we're not going to talk about how to reference a source. We're going to talk about the two other aspects: How to write more formally and objectively, and what are the ten common errors that students make when they are not formal enough. Okay? So not ten, twelve. Here we go. So first of all, using contractions. All of these are what you should not do, okay? So avoid using contractions. Sorry. In this case, don't use contractions at all. So don't say "don't"; say "do not". Don't say "isn't"; say "is not". All right? That's academic English. Next, avoid phrasal verbs. So for example, instead of saying "go up" -- "Prices went up. -- say, "Prices increased." Instead of saying "take away", say "removed". Avoid these multi-part verbs. All right? It's not as formal. Next, avoid idioms. Instead of saying, "It was A1", say, "It was excellent." All right? Avoid slang. Don't say "kids"; say "children". Use the proper terminology for various subjects. Avoid pronouns. So for example, instead of saying, "You can see from the graph..." -- all right. We use the pronoun "you". Instead of that, say, "The graph shows..." all right? Next, avoid negatives. For example, instead of saying, "Something is not effective", just say, "It is ineffective." Instead of saying something is "not positive", say, "It's negative." So avoid these kinds of negatives. Next, avoid clichés. Now, what are "clichés"? "Clichés" are a kind of idiom, basically -- commonly used expressions. All right? And so on. Kind of a common wisdom about different things. And so you want to avoid these kinds of expressions. For example, instead of saying, "When all is said and done" -- all right? We use that in conversation, but you don't want to use it in your academic writing. Instead of saying that, you'd probably use an expression like "in conclusion". All right? So next, there are certain kinds of punctuation -- there are actually lots of rules about punctuation. And the kind of punctuation, the style of punctuation that you use in academic writing depends on the style guide that you have been asked to follow in your school, college, or university. Some very well-known style guides are the MLA or APA. These are certain style guides, and they tell you everything about how you need to write, what rules you need to follow, what are the rules of punctuation and of quotations marks, of this and that. Okay? A lot more than what I'm covering here. But in general, I can just tell you that we don't see that many exclamation marks in academic writing, okay? We do see a lot of semicolons. All right? That's kind of -- when do we use a semicolon? Do you remember? Okay. What's the difference between a period and a semicolon? A period clearly divides two sentences. And a semicolon has one sentence which is a complete sentence; then you put the semicolon. You do not capitalize the next letter, and the next sentence is connected, and you want to show that it's connected to the first sentence, which is a very academic, intellectual, philosophical thing to do. So learn to use semicolons if you're in university especially.
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
Resource: Elements of Grammar & Style
 
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Want to know more? Go to hhttp://booksyoulllove.com/ttp://www.tenboominstitute.com/blog for insightful discussion questions, author bios, themes, amazing links to interviews and other important references, learning resources, discussion tips, reading and writing skills and much, much, more! The Elements of Grammar and the The Elements of Style by Strunk, White and Shertzer are brilliant books on writing that are critical for everyone! Whether you need to know how to use a dash or want more info improving your style, these books are virtually all you need for your home, business, school, children or any time you need to write!
English Grammar - Inversion: "Had I known...", "Should you need..."
 
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http://www.engvid.com Should you need help understanding why the subject in this sentence comes after the verb, I can show you. In this English grammar lesson, we will look at sentences in which the subject and verb order is inverted, and the particular situations in which to use them. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-inversion/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about inversion. Now, what does "inversion" mean? "Inversion" is when you change the order of something. Right? So we're looking at grammar. Usually, you know in a sentence a subject comes first and then a verb. Today we're going to look at situations where that is reversed. Now, of course, I'm sure that you know that in questions: "Are you sure?" the verb comes before the subject in all questions. That's what makes a question structure a question structure. However, there are other situations where we have this inversion, but we're looking at a sentence; we're not looking at a question. Now, the thing to understand about inversions is that they are very particular. There are only a few expressions that you're going to use inversion with. You can't put them in just about... In just any sentence that you want. The examples that I've written on the board are the ones that you might read or that you might want to write. There are other situations that use this, but unless you're writing poetry or artistic, creative novels - you don't need them and you don't really need to worry about them either. They're very rare. It's very rare you'll see them. It's very, very formal language style. And you'll recognize them, hopefully, when you do see them. So let's start here. When we have "not only". Generally speaking, when we have a sentence that begins with a negative, we're going to have inversion, but especially when you have "not only", you're going to have inversion. Okay? "Not only did he", so there's your verb, there's your subject, there's your verb. Okay? We have the helping verb, the auxiliary verb to start. "Not only did he win", and then we have the "but", "also" to go with "not only". This is like an expression that's fixed; you're always going to be looking at the same thing. "Not only did he win, but he also broke the record." Whatever. "Not only", inversion, "but also". "Under no circumstances", this is another expression that you'll see regularly. And again, we're looking at the negative construction which is why we're looking at the inversion. "Under no circumstances should you call her/call him." Okay? Whatever you do, don't call. "Under no circumstances". "Circumstances", basically situation. In no situation should you call. In no situation, same idea. Okay? Another negative: "nor". What is "nor"? Is the negative of "or". Okay? "Or", "nor". Again, many people don't use this word anymore; it's a little bit old-fashioned, a little bit high formality level. But... "The mayor of Toronto refused to resign, nor do we expect him to." Okay? So after "nor", we still have the inversion. Verb, subject, verb. Verb, subject. Okay? I'm not sure if you know the mayor of Toronto, he's very famous now. We're not very proud, but that's a whole other story. Next, so these are the three negatives. These two are also very similar. Again, very formal style, but you might see it, you might want to use it in your essays or whatever. "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." What does this mean? "Should you need", if you need. "Should" is just a more formal way to say: "if". "If you need any help, don't hesitate to call.", "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." Now, this is a verb, subject, verb. If we use: "if", then there's no issue. Then you have "if" which is a conjunction, adverb, clause, conjunction, subject, verb. "Should" makes it verb, subject, verb. "Had" is the same thing with the "if", but a different structure of the conditional, a different "if" structure. "Had I known you were coming, I would have changed." "If I had known", "If I had known you were coming", "Had I known", it's basically you're making the sentence a little bit shorter, a little more formal. You're starting with a verb, a subject, and another verb. Okay? Past perfect, of course. So these are the conditionals, these are the no's. Now, we have the comparatives, when you're comparing something. When you're comparing an action, so you're using the clause marker: "as", not the preposition: "like". So: "John speaks Chinese, as does Lucy." Okay? "Lucy" is actually the subject, here's the verb, here's a subject. Now, I could put a period and put a new sentence. "So does Lucy." Same idea. "Lucy does as well." If I want the subject, verb order. But when you start with "as", you're going to invert the order. This is a clause marker, adverb clause marker to compare.
Learn English Vocabulary: kind of, sort of, type of, style of...
 
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Whether you are talking about the different styles of music you like or the kinds of foods you can and cannot eat, you frequently talk about categories, sometimes without realizing it. In this lesson, I will teach you phrases that you can use to describe categories of things that are important to you. This will help you discuss differences or things you have in common with others. For example, you could talk about a "type" of movie, a "style" of clothing, a "sort" of person, etc. Native English speakers often use shorter forms of these words, and I will teach you how to use this slang, as well. Take the quiz on this lesson at https://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-kind-of-sort-of/ . #engvid #LearnEnglish #vocabulary TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. This is my style of magazine; it gives me a lot of information, and the type of information I get from it is sort of cool. Now, I've used three terms or phrases: "sort of", "kind of", "style of" that you may not be familiar with; or if you are familiar, you don't truly understand. My job today is to tell you the difference between the individual words: "kind", "sort", "style", and "type"; what it means when you put "of"; what the slang meaning "of"; and how you can use it. I have a complicated drawing on the board, but I'll help you understand it in a second. And by the time we're done, you'll be able to use these phrases like a native speaker. Okay, so let's go to the board. First thing, E: "What are these types of words?" The first thing E will tell you is, well, first of all, they're different types of words so we can't say they're adjectives, they're this, this, and this. Each word has its own meaning, and sometimes they have two. I'm going to go to the board now and start working on that with you. All right? So let's get on this side. So, let's look at the first one: "kind". "Kind" is a word you've probably heard before. "She is a kind woman.", "He has a kind face." And we mean nice and friendly. Now, you might not be aware that it also is a noun, as in category. If you look over here: What is "category"? It is people or things that have something in common; they share together. Okay? Like music. Music can be jazz, blues, classical, rock - they're in the category of music, not movies, because they're all types of, you know, instruments and people singing. So when you say: "What type of or kind of music do you like?" We're saying: "What category? Is it jazz? Is it rock?" because they all share music together, but there's something specific with each genre or grouping, so we say: "kind of", and that tells us what category. And the next one we're going to talk about is "style". Now, some of you like my style, right? When we say "style", we say way of doing something, that's his style. So, some people like Michael Jordan, when he used to throw a ball he'd have his tongue out - that was his style. Not many NBA athletes do that, but he would, so you knew when Michael went: "Ah", he was about to jump and throw it. Appearance, like my appearance. I love superheroes so I'm always wearing... Not always, but a lot of time wearing superhero clothing or costumes. And those of you who know me know I love Batman. So, when you talk about someone's style, you talk about their general appearance; what they wear regularly. Okay? Or their way of doing something, like I said, Michael Jordan. We also use it for elegance, which means sophisticated, not common, above average. Usually people say elegant people have money, but it's not the case. It just means they have a certain way about them that makes them special, and people like it and respect it; to be elegant. But "style" also means... It's also a verb, as in to design. So when you design or make something in a specific way, it's that style. So if it's in the classical style, it's made like the classics. If it's in the modern style, it's made like modern things, like all white furniture. Okay? Once we add "of", and you notice I added "of" to "kind of" to talk about category, once again, we get a noun. Right? So we go: "kind of", we become a noun... We can use it as a noun as well. Right? "Kind of" from grouping. Same thing, people or if things are together. So if you say: "What style of music do you like?" it's similar to saying: "What kind of music do you like?" Okay? The "of" brings these things together to give them something common or puts them in a given category, you might say. Why am I teaching you this? To go back again, because a lot of times we say this when we want to talk about what groupings go together and preferences. There's a little bit more to it, which I'll get back to afterwards, but as long as you understand that "kind" with "of" and "style" with "of" are similar that they talk about category. What's the next one I'm going to go to? Well, let's go to "type". Typing: "Ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch", now, you do that on the computer. […]
Active vs. Passive Voice | Grammar Lessons
 
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Watch more Grammar Lessons videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/515781-Active-vs-Passive-Voice-Grammar-Lessons One of the fastest ways to improve your writing is to learn the difference between the active voice and the passive voice, and to adopt the active voice as often as you can. But before we can start to write in the active voice, we do need to know the difference. So the active voice is a sentence in which the actor, or the subject, comes before the action, or the verb. For this example, "Batman threw Joker from a seventy-story building." Let's find the verb. In this case, it's threw. That's the action. And so our actor, or our subject, is Batman. And you can see that this is an active sentence, because we lead with our subject, we go into our verb, and then we go into our object, which is the person receiving the action. The result is a really active sentence. The active voice kind of sounds the way you think it would. The sentence moves in a very logical fashion. There is a lot of momentum in the sentence. If you wrote that sentence in the passive voice, it would look like this. Joker was thrown from the building my Batman. In this case, our subject comes last, our verb is up here, and our object is the Joker who's leading the sentence. So you can it's a kind of backward construction, which can slow the reader down, because we are starting with the receiver of an action, rather than the person who is initiating the action. Another way to look at passive construction, you might see a sentence that looks like this. Joker was thrown from the building. And in this case, the person who did the throwing doesn't even appear in the sentence. So oftentimes, a passive voice can sort of hide the actor. This can be useful. Say you're writing and email to a boss, and you need to say that your boss forgot to pay you that week. You might say something like, "My check did not arrive," without saying who neglected to mail the check. So sometimes the passive voice can be your friend, but in general active voice leads to stronger writing and a much more compelling reading experience.
Views: 182581 Howcast
PhD thesis writing style and grammar tips
 
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http://thefreeschool.education Free peer tuition online at: http://chat.thefreeschool.education The Free School. Supporting graduate research scholars.
The scale of formality | Style | Grammar
 
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How formal or informal should you be when you write or speak? Let's dive into that!
Views: 31315 Khan Academy
Why do you mix past & present tense while speaking English?  - Grammar lesson
 
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Why do you mix past & present tense while speaking English? - Grammar lesson Blog : http://www.learnex.in/mixing-past-and-present-tense-while speaking-english This English lesson is all about how we mix the present and the past tense when speaking English. It explains the rules, stating why it is correct to do this in certain scenarios and how such sentences can be used in English conversation correctly. Website : http://www.letstalkpodcast.com Facebook : http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast The main sentence used to explain this is: I wouldn’t say that John disagreed with his girlfriend but it is clear that he did not approve of her decision. In this sentence, the verb disagreed is in the past tense and the (to be) verb is, is in the present tense. Yet this sentence is correct. Let’s see why #Thoughts can occur in the past or the present. Ex: He did not approve of the decision - in this sentence you are thinking about his action in the past Ex: I think he did not approve of the decision – in this sentence you are thinking about his action in the present and expressing your thoughts. #Reported speech and reported thoughts have their own time. Reported speech – talking about something that someone said in the past If you talk about the time when someone said something in the past you say: She told me that she wanted some money. However, if you talk about the time that someone was talking about you say: He taught me that time is precious. # We switch to the present for dramatic effect. When we tell a story or narrate an incident we need to catch the listener’s attention. Hence it is very important that our speech sounds interesting. For example: I was alone at home last night. Suddenly I hear a loud cry from outside. In this sentence, the words was and last night indicate the past tense but the verb hear is in the present tense in order to gain the listeners attention . This is correct usage. #Mistakes made when you speak fast. Sometimes, when we speak fast we tend to make mistakes without realizing and that can also lead to mixing the present and the past tense. However, we need to make sure that we use the tenses correctly. For example: I did not knew this, but I know it now. Knew is incorrect, you should say know since you are using the past tense in the sentence.
INVERSION—ADD STYLE WITH ADVANCED GRAMMAR | English with GRAMMAR MAN
 
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Grammar man teaches inversion in today's English lesson. Used sparingly, this will really add style and flair to your English speaking and writing. The noun 'inversion' means to 'make something it's opposite.' In English grammar, it refers to changing our normal word order, of subject + helping verb + verb to helping verb + subject. For example: Under no circumstances should you miss this lesson! Here, the modal verb, 'should', has come before the subject! THIS IS INVERSION...Not that difficult after all :) This lesson teaches why we use inversion, and provides students with around 10 examples of phrases that are commonly inverted. Be sure to check out Grammar man's other lessons on English grammar, as well as English lessons on vocabulary, pronunciation, common errors and everything in between, which are posted on the 'English lessons with Grammar man' channel every few days :) Grammar man is a professional English teacher from Australia. He now resides in Switzerland where he is director of the prestigious language learning academy - Progressive English located in Zurich. ******Grammar man offers FREE ENGLISH LESSONS monthly to students from around the world via SKYPE. Check out the Grammar man Facebook page for details: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishGrammarMan1/ ***ENGLISH LESSONS AT GRAMMAR MAN'S ENGLISH SCHOOL IN SWITZERLAND - PROGRESSIVE ENGLISH https://www.progressive-english.ch SKYPE LESSONS IF YOU ARE NOT LOCATED IN SWITZERLAND *** https://www.progressive-english.ch/ Good luck with your English goals, and life goals!
How to Write Numbers | Grammar Lessons
 
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Watch more Grammar Lessons videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/515803-How-to-Write-Numbers-Grammar-Lessons If you find your self needing to write a number, you might question whether you should spell it out, used the word or you should use the numeral. Well, this is really a matter of style so it depends on who your writing for and what's style guide your following but one of the most common style guide is the associated press style book and so I'll give you the AP rule, but just note that whenever your this you might wanna look up the style of which ever publication you are writing for. The AP style book, suggest that whenever you have a number one trough nine you spell it out and when you have a number great than nine you used the numeral. When will you can remember this is that if you have a number that is at least two digits like 10, we wanna use the numeral but if we have a number that's one digit like let's say seven, we wanna write it out. So the AP does two exceptions, they say that whenever your writing an age or measurement you should use the numeral, so that's even if the age is two digits or more, say your wanna say that someone is 13 years old, you would write "He is 13 years old" Using the numeral, if I wanna say "He is 6 feet tall" It would look like this, again were using the numeral and in this case were hyphenating 6 and feet because there forming an adjective phrase to describe how tall he is. I hope that, that gives you some good information about how to use numbers, when to spell them out and when to use the numeral. Always remember to check the style guide that your using and if you don't use a style guide, the important thing is that you be consistent trough out what ever your writing.
Views: 22940 Howcast
[Introduction to Linguistics] (OLD) Word Order, Grammar, and Phrase Structure Rules
 
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In this video we look at word order in languages, grammaticality, prescriptive and descriptive grammar, as well as some basic phrase structure rules. Check out my NEW syntax series on my YouTube channel for more syntax! Visit our website: http://bit.ly/1zBPlvm Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1vWiRxW Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1vWwDRc Hello, welcome to TheTrevTutor. I'm here to help you learn your college courses in an easy, efficient manner. If you like what you see, feel free to subscribe and follow me for updates. If you have any questions, leave them below. I try to answer as many questions as possible. If something isn't quite clear or needs more explanation, I can easily make additional videos to satisfy your need for knowledge and understanding.
Views: 101853 TheTrevTutor
Creating A Style Guide & Voice - Business Writing & Grammar
 
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Click here for full course playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?feature=edit_ok&list=PL7x45KHuu46l1lMErNTx6gkTRMt48oRLV Good writing is one of the most neglected but critical ingredients for business success. Bad writing can compromise the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns and risk your relationship with customers, clients and employees. Great writing, however, has the power to not only make an excellent first impression, but to persuade people to listen to you. This course will walk you through everything you need to know in order to improve your advertisements, Facebook and twitter posts, email newsletters, B2B communications, business proposals and much more. It will also address the most common grammatical errors that professionals make, and how to correct them. For more information and resources, be sure to check out http://www.docstoc.com. There you'll have access to an array of valuable tools to help you start and grow a business. And for additional video courses, check out http://www.docstoc.com/courses
Views: 17519 docstocTV
👍👍👍| Direct and indirect speech (indirect discourse, or indirect) English grammar Tamil-part1
 
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Direct or quoted speech, eported speech, indirect discourse, or indirect style. प्रत्यक्ष और अप्रत्यक्ष भाषण (अप्रत्यक्ष प्रवचन, या अप्रत्यक्ष) अंग्रेजी व्याकरण . English grammar- ஆங்கில இலக்கணம் Direct and indirect speech நேர்கூற்று மற்றும் அயற்கூற்று Download from browser : https://www.tubebuddy.com/entainfotubebuddy TNPSC general english Types of sentences 1.Statement sentence- செய்தி வாக்கியம். 2.Imperative sentence- கட்டளை / வேண்டுகோள் வாக்கியம். 3.interrogetive sentence- வினா வாக்கியம். 4.Exclamatory sentence- வியப்பு / உணர்ச்சி வாக்கியம் . Changing sentence Direct speech to indirect speech. Rules to changing Direct to indirect speech say, says, say to, says to , said, said to, told, asked, requested, commanded. This is Direct and indirect speech, English grammar tutorial. SSLC,10th standard, Tamilnadu syllabus, English paper 1, Question no.27 Here, i explained what is reported speech and what is reporting speech?. Follow me at twitter https://twitter.com/KsVelavan
Views: 48747 ENTA INFO
Formal Grammar and Style
 
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11 non-vocabulary related ways to make your writing more formal.
Views: 85 theLecturette
Writing: Grammar, Usage, and Style
 
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Title: Writing: Grammar, Usage and Style Authors: Jean Eggenschwiler and Emily Dotson Biggs Language: English
Views: 299 Franco Msgl
Top 100 English Grammar Rules | 2018 मे होने वाली परीक्षाओ के लिए सबसे महत्वपूर्ण | SSC CHSL | CGL
 
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Click Here For PDF : http://www.mahendraguru.com/2018/01/top-100-english-grammar-rules-for-ssc.html Daily Live Class Schedule: - 07:00 AM - CURRENT AFFAIRS LIVE 08:00 AM - THE EDITORIAL TIMES 09:00 AM - ENGLISH SBI CLERK PRELIMS CLASS LIVE 10:00 AM - MATHS SBI CLERK PRELIMS CLASS LIVE 11:00 AM - REASONING SBI CLERK PRELIMS CLASS LIVE 12:00 PM - GS SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE 03:00 PM - ENGLISH SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE 04:00 PM - MATHS SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE 05:00 PM - REASONING SSC CHSL CLASS LIVE Get the Strategies from our Experts to Crack English in SSC CHSL | CGL | MTS | Other Competitive Exams 2018. It is always good to have an expert advise to make your plan more constructive as well as successful in order to achieve anything having worth. This videos exclusively designed in such a way that you can cover up major sections easily and score max marks. Are You Preparing For Government Job | Banking | SSC | Railway | Other Competitive Examination then Join Mahendras To Enhance your practice on Stportal : https://stportal.mahendras.org/ Buy our New Speed Test Cards From : MYSHOP- https://myshop.mahendras.org Visit Branch Location - https://mahendras.org/branches.aspx Subscribe to our Mahendra Guru Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q?sub_confirmation=1 YOU MAY ALSO WATCH THESE VIDEOS:: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q/playlists ENGLISH PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFo1UjvnFTFgkVG0Zw5QNCM MATHS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPEqciVVc70WFzIuYPvy-fkL REASONING PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHWI9gFGyt_VQ2QFkw-tYU6 GA PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHsYRImGgN2KD3hDuGZ9YZg GS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPGfOgRGCOerAXQ8z9Z-JzZA COMPUTER PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFuAPo8JnMaeGyTDsBBaNBs IMPORTANT FOR BANK / SSC / RAILWAYS EXAM. JOIN US ON :- FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Emahendras/ TWITTER : https://twitter.com/Mahendras_mepl INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/mahendra.guru/ PINTEREST : https://in.pinterest.com/gurumahendra/ GOOGLE + : https://plus.google.com/+MahendraGuruvideos 1. No duplicacy or editing of the videos is allowed without the written permission of the publisher. 2. All the dispute are subject to Lucknow Jurisdiction only. @ Copyright Reserved
APA Style - Grammar and Usage
 
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This video explains correct grammar and usage according to APA style.
Views: 2524 Dr. Todd Grande
English Grammar Presentation: Sentence Style
 
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This is our grammar project for English 090 based on Sentence Style and Structure. It Includes, Parallelism, Needed words, Sentence Emphasis, Shifts, and Sentence variety.
ENGLISH GRAMMAR SONG BY EVERWIN SCHOOL 2014
 
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I love to Sing & Cheer The Beauty of English Grammar ( A Song, in Western Style, on Basic English Grammar By Everwin School, Chennai) Written By B Purushothaman, Senior Principal / Music:Thashi / Voice: Pop Vinaitha I love to Sing And Cheer The Beauty of English Grammar ‘Subject’, ‘Verb’ And ‘Object’ A Sentence Becomes Perfect ‘I’, ‘We’, ‘You’, ‘He’ ‘She’, ‘It’ And ‘They’ Are Subject Pronouns ‘Me’, ‘Us’, ‘You’, ‘Him’, ‘Her’, ‘It’ And ‘Them’ Are Object Pronouns ------------ ‘Present’, ‘Past’ & ‘Future’ Are the Trees of Tenses ‘Simple’, ‘Continuous’, ‘Perfect’ And ‘Perfect Continuous’ Are All Their Branches We Call Making Sentence Out of These ‘Conjugation’ Called It is ------------ Describe An Action Comes ‘Verb’ Attraction ‘Present Verb’, ‘Past Verb’, ‘Present Participle’ And ‘Past Participle’ Are the forms of Verb ‘Go’, ‘Went’, ‘Going’ And ‘Gone’ An Example To Make it Fine ------------- Let’s now capture the ‘Auxiliary Verbs’ ‘Am’, ‘Is’, ‘Are’ ‘Have’, ‘Has’, ‘Do’ ‘Does’ And More Fall in Present ‘Was’, ‘Were’, ‘Had’ And ‘Did’ Take the Past Beat ‘Shall’ And ‘Will’ Alone Play Future Tone ‘Being’, ‘Having’ And ‘Doing’ Also Keep the List Going ------------ Nine More We Boast ‘Can’, ‘Could’, ‘May’, ‘Might’, ‘Shall’, ‘Will’, ‘Should’, ‘Must’ And ‘Would’ Make a Fine Toast I love to Sing And Cheer The Beauty of English Grammar
Views: 95928 EVERWIN SCHOOL
Use Auxiliary Verbs For Emphasis - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn how to use auxiliary verbs for emphasis. Look at two sentences: "I like chocolate"; "I do like chocolate." Do you know the difference between these two sentences? In the second sentence–"I do like chocolate"–we use the auxiliary verb 'do' to add emphasis. In this lesson, you will learn how to use auxiliary verbs like 'do' or 'will' to add emphasis to the things you say in English. See the full version of this free English lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/using-auxiliary-verbs-emphasis What you can learn in this English video lesson: - How to use auxiliary verbs for emphasis. - When to use auxiliary verbs like do and will for emphasis. - How to use auxiliary verbs in different verb tenses. - How to use auxiliary verbs to express contrast or disagreement. See more of our free English lessons here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons A big thank you to the Alphabet translation team from Syria for the Arabic captions!
Views: 36924 Oxford Online English
Parts of speech with examples || English grammar (in hindi)
 
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I Recommend this book for practice :- http://amzn.to/2gzNYiG (affiliate) FOR ANY QUERY ABOUT RULES AND METHOD whatsapp [email protected] mail me @ [email protected] follow me on [email protected]://www.facebook.com/be.banker.1 follow me on :- instagram https://www.instagram.com/be_banker/?hl=en follow me on [email protected] --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- APOLOGY :-sorry to all viewers In adjective - (Ram is a good boy) is mistakenly written as (Ram is good a boy) 🙏🙏🙏 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FOR MORE IMPORTANT VIDEOS: (1) VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQmEg37eZw0 (2)VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pw4o0EyX7OI (3)VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4LqeC3nFKQ (4))VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv-KDCzcJ_Y (5)SQUARE ROOT IN 3 SECOND⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10Hl6TWglmk (6)CUBE ROOT IN 5 SECOND⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZrL32TetgU (7)5 TIPS TO BE BANK PO⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNZAUswpVm4 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BE BANKER:-https://www.youtube.com/c/bebanker THIS CHANNEL IS ALL ABOUT STUDY, THAT IS FOR BANK AND OTHER SIMILAR COMPETITIVE EXAMS ,WHICH MIGHT HELP TO SCHOOL GOERS,COLLEGE GOERS AND ONE WHO WANTS TO LEARN... THIS CHANNEL PROVIDES TIPS, TRICKS, STRATEGIES AND OTHER STUDY STUFFS ... SO BE WITH BE BANKER :) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IT is an initiative BY SANJEEV SIR to assist students who cannot afford costly coaching or require some more time to understand the concept taught in huge size class rooms. Students who are preparing for Government Jobs SSC, Banking, IBPS, SBI, Clerical, Probationary Officer, PO, RRB, Railways, Apprentice, LIC, FCI, Army, Airforce, AFCAT, NDA, CDS, MBA Entrance Exams , CAT, XAT , IIFT, IRMA, NMAT, MHCET, CMAT, MAT, ATMA, BBA, CLAT, LSAT, HOTEL MANAGEMENT, NTSE, OLYMPIADS, MCA, NIMCET, HTET, CTET , IIT, JEE have access to Qualitative and Comprehensive Video Sessions of on Quantitative Aptitude ( Maths), Reasoning ( Verbal and Nonverbal), English ( Grammar, Vocabulary, Comprehension etc ) General Knowledge, Data Interpretation, Data Analysis, Data Sufficiency, Current Affairs FREE OF COST on this channel.
Views: 260879 BE BANKER
English grammar - Synthesis of Sentences in Hindi (Part-1)
 
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In this video I have provided the rules to combine two or more Simple Sentences into a one Simple Sentence by using Participle. Watch this video about synthesis https://youtu.be/av356Bs_Q7g My channel link is - http://www.youtube.com/c/Dreamclasses
Views: 105061 Dream classes
Proofread Bot - Grammar, Style, Spelling, and Plagiarism Checker
 
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Proofread Bot checks your writing for grammar, style, spelling, statistic and plagiarism issues and gives recommendations to improve your writing. The tool gives you a visual text editing interface and an auto generated textual report for your convenience. The written report contains additional information, such as readability scores. Proofread Bot already has thousands of language rules, and if you have an idea for a new rule or check, please suggest it in the support forums. The first language Proofread Bot supports is English, but more languages are coming. You can see a sample report here: http://proofreadbot.com/proofreading/132
Views: 5748 György Chityil
English Grammar Boot Camp | The Great Courses
 
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Start your FREE trial of The Great Courses Plus here: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/special-offer?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=136322 Grammar! For many of us, the word triggers memories of finger-wagging schoolteachers, and of wrestling with the ambiguous and complicated rules of using formal language. But what is grammar, really? In fact, it’s the integral basis of how we speak and write. As such, a refined awareness of grammar opens a world of possibilities for both your pleasure in the English language and your skill in using it, in both speech and the written word. As a foundation for writing, a detailed grounding in grammar and usage will hugely expand your resources for meaningful verbal expression, for navigating the subtleties of the language, and for achieving clarity of communication and stylistic power. In English Grammar Boot Camp, linguist and popular Great Courses professor Anne Curzan of the University of Michigan takes you on an enjoyable exploration of the essential aspects of English grammar. These 24 spirited and accessible lectures offer you a comprehensive core training—a linguistic “boot camp,” by which we mean a thorough immersion in all of the key elements of English grammar and usage, in their most immediate, practical application. Speaking with incisive insight, a Socratic teaching style, and refreshing humor, Professor Curzan leads you sequentially through the workings of the many parts of speech, from nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs to the fine points of determiners, intensifiers, prepositions, coordinating and subordinating conjunctions, conjunctive adverbs, dangling modifiers, and more. In the final part of the course, you’ll combine all of these elements to take a penetrating look at matters of style and clarity, in settings ranging from daily speech to formal, academic, and scientific writing. Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel – we are adding new videos all the time! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TheGreatCourses
Direct Indirect speech or Narration (English Grammar) for ssc, bank exams
 
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I Recommend this book for practice :- http://amzn.to/2gzNYiG (affiliate) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- At the begining of the video, the example (Maine aam khaya = mere dwara aam khaya gya ) i have said that is just to clear the sense of direct &indirect ,but that is not direct and indirect sentence. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FOR ANY QUERY ABOUT RULES AND METHOD whatsapp [email protected] 7004119526 mail me @ [email protected] follow me on :- [email protected]://www.facebook.com/be.banker.1 follow me on [email protected] follow me on :- instagram https://www.instagram.com/be_banker/?hl=en --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VIDEO INTRO :::: SOUND CREDITS: MUSIC IS PROVIDED BY::::NCS SOURCE::: https://youtu.be/-xKKo7t72Tg SOUND ARTIST::::"Alive" by Itro & Kontinuum --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FOR MORE IMPORTANT VIDEOS: (1) VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQmEg37eZw0 (2)VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pw4o0EyX7OI (3)VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4LqeC3nFKQ (4))VEDIC MULTIPLICTION ⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv-KDCzcJ_Y (5)SQUARE ROOT IN 3 SECOND⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10Hl6TWglmk (6)CUBE ROOT IN 5 SECOND⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZrL32TetgU (7)5 TIPS TO BE BANK PO⇒https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNZAUswpVm4 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BE BANKER:-https://www.youtube.com/c/bebanker THIS CHANNEL IS ALL ABOUT STUDY, THAT IS FOR BANK AND OTHER SIMILAR COMPETITIVE EXAMS ,WHICH MIGHT HELP TO SCHOOL GOERS,COLLEGE GOERS AND ONE WHO WANTS TO LEARN... THIS CHANNEL PROVIDES TIPS, TRICKS, STRATEGIES AND OTHER STUDY STUFFS ... SO BE WITH BE BANKER :) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------IT is an initiative BY SANJEEV SIR to assist students who cannot afford costly coaching or require some more time to understand the concept taught in huge size class rooms. Students who are preparing for Government Jobs SSC, Banking, IBPS, SBI, Clerical, Probationary Officer, PO, RRB, Railways, Apprentice, LIC, FCI, Army, Airforce, AFCAT, NDA, CDS, MBA Entrance Exams , CAT, XAT , IIFT, IRMA, NMAT, MHCET, CMAT, MAT, ATMA, BBA, CLAT, LSAT, HOTEL MANAGEMENT, NTSE, OLYMPIADS, MCA, NIMCET, HTET, CTET , IIT, JEE have access to Qualitative and Comprehensive Video Sessions of on Quantitative Aptitude ( Maths), Reasoning ( Verbal and Nonverbal), English ( Grammar, Vocabulary, Comprehension etc ) General Knowledge, Data Interpretation, Data Analysis, Data Sufficiency, Current Affairs FREE OF COST on this channel.
Views: 1736055 BE BANKER
Direct Indirect Speech | Narration | English Grammar in Hindi | Awal
 
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If you get confused about Direct Indirect Speech or Narration in English grammar, watch this simple and easy lesson to learn direct indirect speech in Hindi to clear all your doubts in this important grammar lesson. Learn rules of reported speech. If you are student of competitive exam such as bank po exam, ssc cgl, etc, narration direct indirect speech is required and you can learn it in easy way here. If you are an advanced or beginner, you will be able to easily understand the difference between direct speech & indirect speech, and how we use in various examples. Full List of All Lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR2GOVaoHO5_o33NOUcvgtFI5IUDInB4K https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Free Hindi & Urdu Life Changing Videos Channel to raise your Success and Happiness level through motivational speech, self help lectures and personality development class by Ts Madaan. This channel also shows health videos by Ms Pinky Madaan and Free English Speaking Course by various Indian trainers like Awal, Neeru Malik, Suresh Kumar and many more, for students to study, learn and practice vocabulary, grammar, etc. Our spoken english classes help you to become confident and have a conversation fluently when you talk to someone. In this reported speech english lesson, know how to make sentences using narration, along with interesting tips and tricks.
Views: 513879 TsMadaan
Australian Slang | Real Life English! | Vocabulary and Common Expressions
 
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Learning the slang vocabulary used by any native English speakers is a challenge… And Australian slang is no exception! In this lesson, I’ll introduce you to a few Australians who will share a few common, Australian expressions! We’ll cover: Chuck a sickie Ace / ripper She’ll be right, (mate)! A tradie, chippy, sparky and brickie Knock off Take it easy Arvo Get some listening practice with some Australian native English speakers! Read the full transcript of this lesson on my blog here: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2018/01/26/australian-slang-real-life-english/ English Tools I recommend! ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Find me here: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRi... TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=8El7SM_pHRU&ref=share Your name will be featured underneath the video 😝
Views: 237882 mmmEnglish
Grammar and Style Resources - myassignmenthelp.com
 
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It is not possible to write correct English without knowing the basics of the language, as there are many rules of grammar which are needed to be followed correctly. Writing grammar assignment is difficult because one has to follow the rules of grammar properly. It is not also mandatory for someone to know all the meanings and spellings of the word that is why we are here to provide you best possible solution. For more information Visit us at: http://myassignmenthelp.com/
DaNcE-(2017)New style!! Learn English!! Grammar
 
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A teacher dance in English class
Views: 13 Niraj Singh
Basic English Grammar | English | All Competitive Exams 2018
 
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Get the strategy from our Experts to Crack English in All Competitive Exams 2018. It is always good to have an expert advise to make your plan more constructive as well as successful in order to achieve anything having worth. This videos exclusively designed in such a way that you can cover up major sections easily and score max marks. Are You Preparing For Government Job | Banking | SSC | Railway | Other Competitive Examination then Join Mahendras To Enhance your practice on Stportal : https://stportal.mahendras.org/ Buy our New Speed Test Cards From : MY SHOP- https://myshop.mahendras.org Visit Branch Location - https://mahendras.org/branches.aspx Subscribe to our Mahendra Guru You tube channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDK... YOU MAY ALSO WATCH THESE VIDEOS:: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDK... ENGLISH PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... MATHS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... REASONING PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... GA PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... GS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... COMPUTER PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... IMPORTANT FOR BANK / SSC / RAILWAYS EXAM. JOIN US ON :- FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Emahendras/ TWITTER : https://twitter.com/Mahendras_mepl INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/mahendra.guru/ PINTEREST : https://in.pinterest.com/gurumahendra/ GOOGLE + : https://plus.google.com/+MahendraGuru... 1. No duplicacy or editing of the videos is allowed without the written permission of the publisher. 2. All the dispute are subject to Lucknow Jurisdiction only. @ Copyright Reserved Mahendras : Branches We have 131 branches all over India which is solely owned by us.To get more details of our branches browse your city & state or contact us on 1800-103-5225.
Rhetorical Grammar- Style as Identity
 
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Presentation on textual analysis of three different authors with very different style choices.
Views: 161 Shannon Catanella
Learn English Grammar – Easiest way to convert Active voice to Passive Voice (simple present )
 
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Learn English Grammar – Easiest way to c Active voice sentences to Passive Voice in simple present tense. Blog : http://www.learnex.in/easiest-way-to-convert-active-voice-sentences-to-passive-voice-in-simple-present-tense In this English Grammar lesson, you are going to learn how to make active voice sentences in the present tense into passive voice sentences. The active voice is used to give importance to the subject or the doer of the action and the passive voice gives importance to the object. Facebook : http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast Website : http://www.letstalkpodcast.com There are basic steps you follow to convert the sentences from active to passive. Interchange the subject and object Take the main verb in its past participle form. Do not change the tense of the original sentence, so add an auxiliary verb. Ensure the doer of the action does not change once the sentence is in the passive voice. Example 01: Mother writes an email. (active) An email is written by mother. (passive) Example 02: Sam is fixing the computer. (active) The computer is being fixed by Sam. Example 03: John has helped Maria. (active) Maria has been helped by John. (passive) Example 04: Why does your brother sing such sad songs? (active) Why are such sad songs sung by your brother? (passive) Example 05: Who is doing the dishes? (active) By whom are the dishes being done? (passive) Example 06: Why have you called me here? (active) Why have I been called here by you? (passive)
ARTICLES #1 I English Grammar in Malayalam
 
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Articles in English To Watch all videos, please visit : www.jafarsadiksenglish.com
Views: 17626 JAFAR SADIK'S ENGLISH

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