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French Revolution in 9 Minutes
 
10:17
Discover the origins of France's spirit of Liberté, Egalité and Fraternité in this bloody decade of the French Revolution! LET ME KNOW WHAT YOU WANT NEXT! HELP SUPPORT THE CREATION OF MORE HISTORY VIDEOS BY DONATING ON http://www.patreon.com/JohnDRuddy Any donations are welcome!! Like John D Ruddy on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JohnDRuddy Follow John D Ruddy on Twitter: http://twitter.com/johndruddy Subscribe on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/JohnDRuddy Enjoy! Please share!
Views: 1436558 John D Ruddy
Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen (French Revolution: Part 4)
 
14:40
http://www.tomrichey.net The long-awaited fourth installment of my French Revolution series addresses the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, which was passed by the National Assembly in 1789. The Declaration outlines the principles of the French Revolution, giving us a picture of both what the revolutionaries were seeking and also a preview of where the Revolution was heading. I present the Declaration of the Rights of Man as a dialogue between Thomas Jefferson and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, as both Jeffersonian liberalism and Rousseau's radical democracy are both evident in the document. This lecture is designed for students taking courses in AP European History and Western Civilization, but should also meet the needs of advanced high school students and lifelong learners. This is part of my French Revolution lecture series, which you may access here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfzs_X6OQBOw3X9AteC7RjzsS1qUWdQCn&action_edit=1
Views: 75514 Tom Richey
The French Revolution for Middle School
 
11:18
Basic overview of the French Revolution. Intended for my 7th grade classroom. I do not own the copyright of the graphics. The graphics are sited/linked to the original location in the google slide.
Views: 4004 Mrs. J West
Summary of French Revolution
 
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Summarizing Important Events and Principles of the French Revolution
Views: 1056 Theon Hub
The Great Controversy: Chapter (15) The Bible And The French Revolution.
 
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The Great Controversy: Chapter (15) The Bible And The French Revolution. Audio Recordings THIS BOOK, READER, IS NOT PUBLISHED TO TELL US THAT THERE IS SIN AND WOE AND MISERY IN THIS WORLD. WE KNOW IT ALL TOO WELL. THIS BOOK IS NOT PUBLISHED TO TELL US THAT THERE IS AN IRRECONCILABLE CONTROVERSY BETWEEN DARKNESS AND LIGHT, SIN AND RIGHTEOUSNESS, WRONG AND RIGHT, DEATH AND LIFE. IN OUR HEART OF HEARTS WE KNOW IT, AND KNOW THAT WE ARE PARTICIPATORS, ACTORS, IN THE CONFLICT. BUT TO EVERY ONE OF US COMES AT TIMES A LONGING TO KNOW MORE OF THE GREAT CONTROVERSY. HOW DID THE CONTROVERSY BEGIN? OR WAS IT ALWAYS HERE? WHAT ELEMENTS ENTER INTO ITS AWFULLY COMPLEX ASPECT? HOW AM I RELATED TO IT? WHAT IS MY RESPONSIBILITY? I FIND MYSELF IN THIS WORLD BY NO CHOICE OF MY OWN. DOES THAT MEAN TO ME EVIL OR GOOD? WHAT ARE THE GREAT PRINCIPLES INVOLVED? HOW LONG WILL THE CONTROVERSY CONTINUE? WHAT WILL BE ITS ENDING? WILL THIS EARTH SINK, AS SOME SCIENTISTS SAY, INTO THE DEPTHS OF A SUNLESS, FROZEN, ETERNAL NIGHT? OR IS THERE A BETTER FUTURE? THE QUESTION COMES CLOSER STILL: HOW MAY THE CONTROVERSY IN MY OWN HEART, THE STRIFE BETWEEN INFLOWING SELFISHNESS AND OUTGOING LOVE, BE SETTLED IN THE VICTORY OF GOOD, AND SETTLED FOREVER? WHAT DOES THE BIBLE SAY? WHAT HAS GOD TO TEACH US ABOUT THIS ETERNALLY IMPORTANT QUESTION? IT IS THE AIM OF THIS BOOK, READER, TO HELP THE TROUBLED SOUL TO A RIGHT SOLUTION OF ALL THESE PROBLEMS. IT IS WRITTEN BY ONE WHO HAS TASTED AND FOUND THAT GOD IS GOOD, AND WHO HAS LEARNED IN COMMUNION WITH GOD AND THE STUDY OF HIS WORD THAT THE SECRET OF THE LORD IS WITH THEM THAT FEAR HIM, AND THAT HE WILL SHOW THEM HIS COVENANT. THAT WE MAY BETTER UNDERSTAND THE PRINCIPLES OF THE ALL-IMPORTANT CONTROVERSY, IN WHICH THE LIFE OF A UNIVERSE IS INVOLVED, THE AUTHOR HAS SET IT BEFORE US IN GREAT, CONCRETE OBJECT LESSONS OF THE LAST TWENTY CENTURIES. THE BOOK OPENS WITH THE SAD CLOSING SCENES OF JERUSALEM'S HISTORY, THE CITY OF GOD'S CHOSEN, AFTER HER REJECTION OF THE iv MAN OF CALVARY, WHO CAME TO SAVE. THENCE ONWARD ALONG THE GREAT HIGHWAY OF THE NATIONS, IT POINTS US TO THE PERSECUTIONS OF GOD'S CHILDREN IN THE FIRST CENTURIES; THE GREAT APOSTASY WHICH FOLLOWED IN HIS CHURCH; THE WORLD-AWAKENING OF THE REFORMATION, IN WHICH SOME OF THE GREAT PRINCIPLES OF THE CONTROVERSY ARE CLEARLY MANIFEST; THE AWFUL LESSON OF THE REJECTION OF RIGHT PRINCIPLES BY FRANCE; THE REVIVAL AND EXALTATION OF THE SCRIPTURES, AND THEIR BENEFICENT, LIFE-SAVING INFLUENCE; THE RELIGIOUS AWAKENING OF THE LAST DAYS; THE UNSEALING OF THE RADIANT FOUNTAIN OF GOD'S WORD, WITH ITS WONDERFUL REVELATIONS OF LIGHT AND KNOWLEDGE TO MEET THE BALEFUL UPSPRINGING OF EVERY DELUSION OF DARKNESS.
Views: 13381 Ellen White
The Leaders of the French Revolution
 
08:46
The French Revolution (lasting from 1756-1799) was a social and political upheaval in France that impacted history forever. Traditional ideas regarding monarchs and the Catholic Church, were suddenly thrown into dislike, while fresh principles of liberty, justice and equality were accepted with relish. The royalty were horrified, causing a counter-crusade that restored the monarchy. However, many reforms became permanent in France, thanks to the sacrifice and determination of the leaders of the revolution. "Viva la Vida" By Coldplay "The Rip Tide" By Beruit "Parisian Glam Slam" By Shawn Lee's Ping Pong Orchestra
Views: 1687 The Uptown Abby
The French Revolution
 
01:31
Here's a short video highlighting the main points of the French Revolution. In April's issue of AQUILA we explore: What happens in a society when the gap between rich and poor gets too wide? What responsibilities do those at the top owe those at the bottom? Are the principles of the French Revolution, of ‘Liberté, Egalité and Fraternité’, still useful today? We’ll investigate all these questions in our feverish French Revolution issue. Harvey looks at the life of Antoine Lavoisier, the ‘father of modern chemistry’. Polly makes rather fetching wigs out of cotton wall. Aquila explores the ghosts of Versailles and Calculata meets Sophie Germain, revolutionary mathematician, physicist and philosopher.
Views: 101 Aquila Magazine
The French Revolution (Documentary)
 
01:30:24
Please consider subscribing and give this video a thumbs up if you enjoyed watching The French Revolution (French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France that lasted from 1789 until 1799, and was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, experienced violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon that rapidly brought many of its principles to Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history. The causes of the French Revolution are complex and are still debated among historians. Following the Seven Years' War and the American Revolutionary War, the French government was deeply in debt and attempted to restore its financial status through unpopular taxation schemes, which were heavily regressive. Years of bad harvests leading up to the Revolution also inflamed popular resentment of the privileges enjoyed by the clergy and the aristocracy. Demands for change were formulated in terms of Enlightenment ideals and contributed to the convocation of the Estates-General in May 1789. The first year of the Revolution saw members of the Third Estate (commoners) taking control, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and a women's march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. A central event of the first stage, in August 1789, was the abolition of feudalism and the old rules and privileges left over from the Ancien Régime. The next few years featured political struggles between various liberal assemblies and right-wing supporters of the monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. The Republic was proclaimed in September 1792 after the French victory at Valmy. In a momentous event that led to international condemnation, Louis XVI was executed in January 1793. External threats closely shaped the course of the Revolution. The Revolutionary Wars beginning in 1792 ultimately featured French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian Peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine – achievements that had eluded previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular agitation radicalised the Revolution significantly, culminating in the rise of Maximilien Robespierre and the Jacobins. The dictatorship imposed by the Committee of Public Safety during the Reign of Terror, from 1793 until 1794, established price controls on food and other items, abolished slavery in French colonies abroad, dechristianised society through the creation of a new calendar and the expulsion of religious figures, and secured the borders of the new republic from its enemies. Large numbers of civilians were executed by revolutionary tribunals during the Terror, with estimates ranging from 16,000 to 40,000. After the Thermidorian Reaction, an executive council known as the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795. The rule of the Directory was characterised by suspended elections, debt repudiations, financial instability, persecutions against the Catholic clergy, and significant military conquests abroad.[7] Dogged by charges of corruption, the Directory collapsed in a coup led by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. Napoleon, who became the hero of the Revolution through his popular military campaigns, went on to establish the Consulate and later the First Empire, setting the stage for a wider array of global conflicts in the Napoleonic Wars. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. Almost all future revolutionary movements looked back to the Revolution as their predecessor, Its central phrases and cultural symbols, such as La Marseillaise and Liberté, fraternité, égalité, ou la mort, became the clarion call for other major upheavals in modern history, including the Russian Revolution over a century later. The values and institutions of the Revolution dominate French politics to this day. The Revolution resulted in the suppression of the feudal system, the emancipation of the individual, the greater division of landed property, the abolition of the privileges of noble birth and the nominal establishment of equality. The French Revolution differed from other revolutions in being not merely national, for it aimed at benefiting all humanity. Globally, the Revolution accelerated the rise of republics and democracies.
The French Revolution
 
16:49
The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies.Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history. -------------------------------------- This video is extracted from 24 Lectures course called "Turning Points in Modern History" instructed by Professor Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius For more information Please visit https://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/turning-points-in-modern-history.html
The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment Compared
 
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http://www.tomrichey.net The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment were similar in so many ways that it's easy to confound the two movements. In this lecture, I use a graphic organizer to go over the similarities and differences between the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, noting how the Scientific Revolution influenced the Enlightenment and how the Enlightenment expanded the scope by applying scientific principles to the organization of society.
Views: 111421 Tom Richey
French Revolution 2/9
 
10:20
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 16947 Shahzad Raja
Homeschool Online Classes: Middle School History: French Revolution
 
03:23
http://www.homeschoolconnections.com Mrs. Stanley's history courses are very popular with students, so make sure to register for live courses early. You can also take her courses as recorded, independent-learning classes through our Unlimited Access program. Here are details for the French Revolution course: The French Revolution: “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death” Total classes: 10 Duration of each class: 55 minutes Prerequisite: None Suggested grade level: 6th to 8th grade Instructor: Alison Stanley, JD Course Description: In 1789, a three-part revolution began in France due to grave inequality between the three classes (“Estates”), the distressed financial condition of the French government and the widespread dissemination of Enlightenment ideals. The rebellion was radical and violent, leading to the abolition of the monarchy and execution of King Louis XVI. Although the monarchy returned to this country, the French Revolution drastically altered Europe forever by abolishing feudalism and promoting the principles of equality and natural right. Course materials: All course materials will be supplied FREE by the instructor. Homework: Homework is approximately 30 minutes a week consisting of original reading from the time period, as well as educational videos. A final project also will be assigned which will be presented at the last class. Moreover, a final exam will be given.
French Revolution 8/9
 
09:56
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 24478 Shahzad Raja
french revolution
 
00:19
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française French pronunciation: ​[ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleonduring the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies.[1]Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.[2][3][4 The causes of the French Revolution are complex and are still debated among historians. Following the Seven Years' Warand the American Revolution,[5] the French government was deeply in debt. It attempted to restore its financial status through unpopular taxation schemes, which were heavily regressive. Leading up to the Revolution, years of bad harvests worsened by deregulation of the grain industry also inflamed popular resentment of the privileges enjoyed by the aristocracy and the Catholic clergy of the established church. Some historians hold something similar to what Thomas Jefferson proclaimed: that France had "been awakened by our [American] Revolution."[6] Demands for change were formulated in terms of Enlightenment ideals and contributed to the convocation of the Estates General in May 1789. During the first year of the Revolution, members of the Third Estate (commoners) took control, the Bastille was attacked in July, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was passed in August, and a group of women marched on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. A central event of the first stage, in August 1789, was the abolition of feudalism and the old rules and privileges left over from the Ancien Régime.
Views: 18 Ca Tarina
French Revolution 4/9
 
10:23
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 17469 Shahzad Raja
Don't Pine for the "Original Principles" of the Bolshevik Revolution
 
01:12:19
The Bolshevik Revolution continues to be romanticized to this day. Plenty of communists claim that if only the Soviet Union could have stuck to the original principles of the Revolution, the horrors would not have occurred. Problem: the horrors began with the Revolution, and the origins of the horrors are to be found there. Subscribe to the Tom Woods Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tom-woods-sho/id716825890?mt=2 http://www.TomWoods.com/1105 http://www.SupportingListeners.com http://www.RonPaulHomeschool.com http://www.FreeHistoryCourse.com http://www.TomsFreeBooks.com
Views: 3240 TomWoodsTV
French Revolution 9/9
 
05:47
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 34620 Shahzad Raja
The French Revolution: Reign of Terror
 
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Reading the 9/11 section on 9/11 at Litcrawl NYC.
Views: 119 duderedman
French Revolution 6/9
 
10:41
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 17587 Shahzad Raja
French Revolution 5 /9
 
10:45
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 14433 Shahzad Raja
French Revolution 3/9
 
10:37
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 18178 Shahzad Raja
Jonathan Israel - Radical Enlightenment and the Making of the French Revolution (1750-1800)
 
01:27:42
UNE Center for Global Humanities and its founding director, Anouar Majid, host Jonathan Israel on "Radical Enlightenment and the Making of the French Revolution (1750-1800)."
French Revolution 7/9
 
10:45
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second).
Views: 107491 Shahzad Raja
Edmund Burke  - Reflections on the French revolution - Christopher Hitchens
 
15:54
Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France is one of the great political tracts in existence. Like Tom Paine (who wrote Rights of Man as a sort of blistering REPLY to Burke’s critique), Burke was engaged in the revolutionary upheaval of that era, and his views are not easily put into a little box.
Views: 4019 LPKvideoDesigns
French Revolution (part 1) | World history | Khan Academy
 
17:05
Part 1 of the French Revolution. From the Convocation of the Estates General to the storming of the Bastille. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/world-history/1600s-1800s/french-revolution-tutorial/v/french-revolution-part-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=worldhistory Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/world-history/euro-hist/cold-war/v/pattern-of-us-cold-war-interventions?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=worldhistory World history on Khan Academy: Do we need kings? Can people govern themselves? What rights do we all have? Can science and understanding uplift all of humanity? This topic lays the foundation for our modern thinking about the world. From democratic revolutions to the establishment of empires backed by industrial power. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s World History channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6KRvvmvkCchFMo2EJ-3Arg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 798802 Khan Academy
French Revolutionary Wars. Wars between principles
 
00:15
French Revolutionary Wars. Wars between principles
Views: 7 pasfeliv81
Mary Wollstonecraft vs. Edmund Burke (Women and the French Revolution: Part 4)
 
06:39
http://www.tomrichey.net In this segment of my series on Women and the French Revolution, I discuss Mary Wollstonecraft's role as a VINDICATOR for women during the French Revolution. In 1790, Edmund Burke, a notable member of Parliament, published a scathing rebuke of the French Revolution, its aims, and its principles. At a time when it wasn't appropriate for a woman to engage in public debate, Mary Wollstonecraft responded to Burke with her Vindication of the Rights of Man. After finishing at this work, Wollstonecraft began writing A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, the work for which she is best known. Wollstonecraft's willingness to step into the arena and engage the public in debates about liberalism and feminism. This is part of my Women and the French Revolution series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfzs_X6OQBOwDhTlP9P__DSDQCVNpS1zj
Views: 28248 Tom Richey
French Revolution videos part 1
 
10:01
French revolution (1789-90s) was the revolution against the monarchy and aristocrats. The cumulative effect of their influence manifested itself in the three watchwords 'liberty, equality and fraternity ', which became the guiding principles of the French Revolution....
2773【20】 ETs Principles in Movies+Les Miserable in French Revolutionフランス革命の中の「ああ無情」と人間の愚かさby Hiroshi
 
32:39
We have another history, hidden behind secret, which has been warped since the beginning days of the humans' history. 私たち人間には、人間がまだ知らない、隠されたもうひとつの歴史がある。 Social Consciousness com writes as follows: Our history is not what we think! Over the past few thousand years, we have warped our own history. Our versions of the past has been mistranslated, changed, altered, and skewed to fit our understanding of reality, and completely left our many things that we cannot explain. Today, we are going to look at an alternate version of our history, a version that was recorded across many ancient tablets and artifacts throughout time, which have only recently been uncovered. I, Hiroshi Hayashi, will present you one of the hundreds of facts I have discovered here in this video. A fact about Leonardo da Vinci. 社会意識・コム・サイトは、つぎのように書いています。 私たちの歴史は、私たちが思っているようなものではない、と。 つまり私たちの歴史は、過去数千年もの間、捻じ曲げられてきた。 人間の歴史は、現実に合わせるため、誤訳され、変えられ、手が加えられ、捻じ曲げられてきた。 そしてその結果、説明できないものを、そのままにしてきた。 私たちは今こそ、もう一方の側にある歴史に目を向けるべきではんないのか。
Views: 108 Hiroshi Hayashi
AP World History - What was the French Revolution?
 
04:19
Get the App! Go to http://bit.ly/MudVXh The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--1799), was a period of radical social and political upheaval in France that had a major impact on France and indeed all of Europe. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from radical left-wing political groups, masses on the streets, and peasants in the countryside. Old ideas about tradition and hierarchy -- of monarchy, aristocracy and religious authority -- were abruptly overthrown by new Enlightenment principles of equality, citizenship and inalienable rights.
Views: 341 MenteonLearning
FRENCH REVOLUTION - WikiVidi Documentary
 
14:08
The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history. The causes of the French Revolution are complex and are still debated am... http://www.wikividi.com ____________________________________ Shortcuts to chapters: 00:05:44 Causes ____________________________________ Copyright WikiVidi. Licensed under Creative Commons. Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Revolution
Alec Nicely-The French Revolution
 
10:39
Alec Nicely HST 354 Final Project Censer and Hunt, "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" Chartier, "A Desacralized King" Robespierre, "On the Principles of Political Morality" Nicolas-Edme Retif, "Diary of the Terror"
America’s Founding Principles Part 2: The American Reaction to the French Revolution
 
01:17:09
Dr. Jonathan Den Hartog speaking at The Charlemagne Institute on August 7th, 2018. He is Department Chair of History & Related Studies, and Associate Professor of History at the University of Northwestern, Saint Paul. This is the second of two lectures on American's Founding Principles. Dr. Den Hartog is the author of Patriotism and Piety: Federalist Politics and Religious Struggle in the New American Nation: Patriotism and Piety: Federalist Politics and Religious Struggle in the New American Nationhttps://amzn.to/2Dx57Ea
French Revolution ( Liberal Phase)
 
03:05
This is for you J-Dawg. Enjoy :)
Views: 1082 AP EURO
Conservatism of Edmund Burke — Richard Bourke
 
12:56
Serious Science - http://serious-science.org Historian Richard Bourke on the French Revolution, Marxism-Leninism, and the defense of liberty http://serious-science.org/conservatism_of_edmund_burke-8491
Views: 11294 Serious Science
6. Maximilien Robespierre and the French Revolution
 
49:57
European Civilization, 1648-1945 (HIST 202) Robespierre's ascetic personal life and severe philosophy of political engagement are attributed by some to his difficult childhood. As a revolutionary, one of his most significant insights was that the Revolution was threatened not only by France's military adversaries abroad, but also by domestic counter-revolutionaries. Under this latter heading were gathered two major groups, urban mercantilists and rural peasants. Relative strength of religious commitment is the major factor in explaining why some regions of France rose up in defense of the monarchy while others supported the Revolution. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Trial of King Louis XVI and the Death of Marat: A Rock Opera 08:41 - Chapter 2. The Life of Maximilien Robespierre 18:30 - Chapter 3. The Jacobins and the Girondins 26:56 - Chapter 4. Counter-Revolutionary Forces: The Federalist Revolt and the Western Peasants 35:01 - Chapter 5. Revolutionary Fervor in Dechristianized Regions 40:32 - Chapter 6. The Terror: Robespierre's Attempt to Save the Revolution Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2008.
Views: 101174 YaleCourses
Bahram Moshiri, بهرام مشيري - French Revolution, انقلاب فرانسه
 
10:46
The French Revolution has received enormous amounts of historical attention, both from the general public and from scholars and academics. The views of historians, in particular, have been characterized as falling along ideological lines, with liberal, conservative, communist, and anarchist scholars, among others; disagreeing over the significance and the major developments of the Revolution. Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution was a manifestation of a more prosperous middle class becoming conscious of its social importance. Other thinkers, like the conservative Edmund Burke, maintained that the Revolution was the product of a few conspiratorial individuals who brainwashed the masses into subverting the old order, a claim rooted in the belief that the revolutionaries had no legitimate complaints. Other historians, influenced by Marxist thinking, have emphasized the importance of the peasants and the urban workers in presenting the Revolution as a gigantic class struggle. In general, scholarship on the French Revolution initially studied the political ideas and developments of the era, but it has gradually shifted towards social history that analyzes the impact of the Revolution on individual lives. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history, and the end of the early modern period, which started around 1500, is traditionally attributed to the onset of the French Revolution in 1789. The Revolution is, in fact, often seen as marking the "dawn of the modern era". Within France itself, the Revolution permanently crippled the power of the aristocracy and drained the wealth of the Church, although the two institutions survived despite the damage they sustained. The French Revolution 1789-1799 was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic, and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries, and most territories west of the Rhine achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the brutal Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794. After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies, and the invention of total war all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy, and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy, and two different empires.
Views: 25147 YekEsfahaniDarParis 1
The French revolution and the English Romantic Revival part-2
 
33:02
The French revolution and the English Romantic Revival part-2 by Dr. Vikas Jaoolkar For Studnet of Madhya Pradesh Bhoj Open University Bhopal B.A 1st year ,English Literature 2nd Paper , 7th Unit Published By EMPRC, MPBOU
Views: 2567 Emprc, Mpbou
France: Revolution, Napoleon and “The Long 19th Century”
 
27:37
Dr. David Shafer, Chair of the CSULB History Department, outlines France from the French Revolution to World War I. Napoleon Bonaparte, the Paris Commune and Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables are covered.
Views: 2258 Beach TV CSULB
The French Resistance - was it of any use to anyone?
 
17:08
The Great Courses Plus free offer: http://ow.ly/hebs303M5VN Who organised the French Resistance? Did it ever do much? Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Lindybeige I had planned to say a lot more, but this should be long enough. In take one, which I had to ditch because my sound recorder packed in half-way through it (but I didn't notice, so carried on), I talked quite a bit about Wing Commander F.F.E. Yeo-Thomas AKA 'The White Rabbit' who did a lot of organising the French Resistance, and I was also planning to talk about 'R.A.F. blackmail sabotage' but perhaps that will come out in another video another day. Probably not, though. Never mind - sixteen minutes should be long enough for anyone. Many of the figures I quote were fresh in my mind because I had just read them in "Dadland" by Keggie Carew. Another influential book on this video was "The White Rabbit" about Wing Commander FFE Yeo-Thomas. Buy the music - the music played at the end of my videos is now available here: https://lindybeige.bandcamp.com/track/the-mandeville-march More weapons and armour videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA860ECD7F894424 Lindybeige: a channel of archaeology, ancient and medieval warfare, rants, swing dance, travelogues, evolution, and whatever else occurs to me to make. ▼ Follow me... Twitter: https://twitter.com/Lindybeige I may have some drivel to contribute to the Twittersphere, plus you get notice of uploads. Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Lindybeige (it's a 'page' and now seems to be working). Google+: "google.com/+lindybeige" website: www.LloydianAspects.co.uk http://www.youtube.com/user/"Lindybeige"
Views: 515688 Lindybeige
French Revolution |  फ्रांस की क्रांति  | World History | UPSC/IAS
 
21:59
Follow Ashna for other courses here-: https://unacademy.com/user/AshnaSisodia?utm_source=Youtube_Live&utm_medium=Ashna_28_06_18&utm_campaign=Ashna You can find Ashna's plus course here-: https://unacademy.com/plus/course/ancient-medieval-history-and-art-culture-made-interesting/L4Y5IXSI?utm_source=Youtube_Live&utm_medium=Ashna_28_06_18&utm_campaign=Ashna In this session Ashna is discussing about the detailed strategy for political science and international relations. A must watch session for UPSC aspirants. You can find Ashna's plus course here-: https://unacademy.com/plus/course/new-political-science-and-international-relations-optional-for-mains/QTEV1QVV?utm_source=Youtube_Live&utm_medium=Aashna_25_06_18&utm_campaign=Aashna In this Course, Ashna Sisodia will discuss French Revolution of World history. A must watch session for UPSC Mains. The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Download the Unacademy Learning App here: Android: https://goo.gl/02OhYI iOS: https://goo.gl/efbytP Download the Unacademy Educator App here: Android: https://goo.gl/H4LGHE iOS: https://goo.gl/1FkFHp Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://goo.gl/gycFVs
Views: 5115 Unacademy
History Channel The French Revolution
 
01:29:41
The French Revolution (French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies.[1] Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.[2][3][4] The causes of the French Revolution are complex and are still debated among historians. Following the Seven Years' War and the American Revolution,[5] the French government was deeply in debt. It attempted to restore its financial status through unpopular taxation schemes, which were heavily regressive. Leading up to the Revolution, years of bad harvests worsened by deregulation of the grain industry also inflamed popular resentment of the privileges enjoyed by the aristocracy and the Catholic clergy of the established church. Some historians hold something similar to what Thomas Jefferson proclaimed: that France had "been awakened by our [American] Revolution."[6] Demands for change were formulated in terms of Enlightenment ideals and contributed to the convocation of the Estates General in May 1789. During the first year of the Revolution, members of the Third Estate (commoners) took control, the Bastille was attacked in July, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was passed in August, and a women's march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. A central event of the first stage, in August 1789, was the abolition of feudalism and the old rules and privileges left over from the Ancien Régime. The next few years featured political struggles between various liberal assemblies and right-wing supporters of the monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. The Republic was proclaimed in September 1792 after the French victory at Valmy. In a momentous event that led to international condemnation, Louis XVI was executed in January 1793. External threats closely shaped the course of the Revolution. The Revolutionary Wars beginning in 1792 ultimately featured French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian Peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine – achievements that had eluded previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular agitation radicalised the Revolution significantly, culminating in the rise of Maximilien Robespierre and the Jacobins. The dictatorship imposed by the Committee of Public Safety during the Reign of Terror, from 1793 until 1794, established price controls on food and other items, abolished slavery in French colonies abroad, de-established the Catholic church (dechristianised society) and created a secular Republican calendar, religious leaders were expelled, and the borders of the new republic were secured from its enemies. Large numbers of civilians were executed by revolutionary tribunals during the Terror, with estimates ranging from 16,000 to 40,000, ranging from aristocrats to "suspected" enemies of the revolution.[7] After the Thermidorian Reaction, an executive council known as the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795. They suspended elections, repudiated debts (creating financial instability in the process), persecuted the Catholic clergy, and made significant military conquests abroad.[8] Dogged by charges of corruption, the Directory collapsed in a coup led by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. Napoleon, who became the hero of the Revolution through his popular military campaigns, established the Consulate and later the First Empire, setting the stage for a wider array of global conflicts in the Napoleonic Wars.
Coffee Brewing Principles with George Howell
 
12:20
An advanced tutorial on achieving balanced coffee extraction & how to taste/identify complex flavors. Learn from the master - coffee guru George Howell.
Views: 20093 How2Heroes
Elvis Placer   The French Revolution Repeats Itself Part 2
 
53:12
Shows how the factors that shaped France prior to and including the Revolution is being repeated today (in the areas of economy, marriage, rejection of Christian principles and values, secret societies). This message was presented at the Autumn Leaves Bible Convention in Christchurch New Zealand. If you would like to get a copy of this or other presentations. Visit http://www.autumnleaves.co.nz/ Like us on facebook https://www.facebook.com/autumnleavesnz
Views: 403 Autumn Leaves
Popular Videos - French Revolution & Documentary Movies hd :  French Revolution 1/9
 
10:01
Popular Videos - French Revolution & Documentary Movies hd : French Revolution 1/9 The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second). Subscribe & More Videos: https://goo.gl/q6GB53 Thank for watching, Please Like Share And SUBSCRIBE!!! #aristocracy, #revolution
Views: 108 Fra Luc
Popular Videos - French Revolution & Documentary Movies hd :  French Revolution 8/9
 
09:13
Popular Videos - French Revolution & Documentary Movies hd : French Revolution 8/9 The French Revolution (French: Révolution française; 1789--99) was a period of radical social and political upheaval in French and European history. The absolute monarchy that had ruled France for centuries collapsed in three years. French society underwent an epic transformation as feudal, aristocratic and religious privileges evaporated under a sustained assault from liberal political groups and the masses on the streets. Old ideas about hierarchy and tradition succumbed to new Enlightenment principles of citizenship and inalienable rights. The French Revolution began in 1789 with the convocation of the Estates-General in May. The first year of the Revolution witnessed members of the Third Estate proclaiming the Tennis Court Oath in June, the assault on the Bastille in July, the passage of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in August, and an epic march on Versailles that forced the royal court back to Paris in October. The next few years were dominated by tensions between various liberal assemblies and a conservative monarchy intent on thwarting major reforms. A republic was proclaimed in September 1792 and King Louis XVI was executed the next year. External threats also played a dominant role in the development of the Revolution. The French Revolutionary Wars started in 1792 and ultimately featured spectacular French victories that facilitated the conquest of the Italian peninsula, the Low Countries and most territories west of the Rhine—achievements that had defied previous French governments for centuries. Internally, popular sentiments radicalized the Revolution significantly, culminating in the Reign of Terror from 1793 until 1794 during which between 16,000 and 40,000 people were killed.[1] After the fall of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directory assumed control of the French state in 1795 and held power until 1799, when it was replaced by the Consulate under Napoleon Bonaparte. The modern era has unfolded in the shadow of the French Revolution. The growth of republics and liberal democracies, the spread of secularism, the development of modern ideologies and the invention of total war[2] all mark their birth during the Revolution. Subsequent events that can be traced to the Revolution include the Napoleonic Wars, two separate restorations of the monarchy and two additional revolutions as modern France took shape. In the following century, France would be governed at one point or another as a republic, constitutional monarchy and two different empires (the First and Second). Subscribe & More Videos: https://goo.gl/q6GB53 Thank for watching, Please Like Share And SUBSCRIBE!!! #feudalism, #revolution
Views: 4 Fra Luc

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